Biology/Human Biology

Bachelor of Science

AIC’s Biology program provides a comprehensive understanding of living organisms, including their structure, function, growth, and evolution.

As a Biology major, you’ll work closely with faculty to develop a solid background in the core principles of the field, become familiar with the process of scientific inquiry, and strengthen your ability to communicate scientific findings.

The Biology program at AIC provides a broad study of scientific knowledge, teaching you to ask questions, assess evidence, and think critically to solve problems — skills needed in any number of fields related to biology, including environmental management, forensics, public health, biotechnology, and laboratory management.

As a graduate of the program, you’ll have the skills and knowledge needed for a variety of advanced degree programs and careers, including:

  • Research/laboratory biology
  • Laboratory management
  • Biotechnology
  • Healthcare
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmaceutical
  • Environmental management, consulting, and conservation

Learning Outcomes for Biology/Human Biology

I’ve had wonderful experiences in AIC’s Biology department. My professors
have helped me with everything from strengthening my writing to improving my skills in laboratory and lecture settings. Their support and dedication has given me the confidence to pursue a career in the medical field after I graduate.

—Bailey Swan ’16 Biology Student

In the classroom. In the workforce.

What you’ll learn

What you’ll learn

You’ll work closely with faculty to develop a solid background in the core principles of the field, become familiar with the process of scientific inquiry, and strengthen your ability to communicate scientific findings.

Future studies

Future studies

The major provides a broad study of scientific knowledge, teaching you to ask questions, assess evidence, and think critically to solve problems—skills needed in any number of fields related to biology.

Career opportunities

Career opportunities

As a graduate of the program, you’ll be prepared to work in research/laboratory biology and laboratory management, industries such as biotechnology, health care, pharmaceutical and environmental management.

Biology (BA) Requirements

  • BIO2400: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy, with laboratory
  • BIO2420: Botany, with laboratory
  • BIO2430: Microbiology, with laboratory or
  • BIO3400: Cell Biology, with laboratory
  • BIO3440: Ecology, with laboratory
  • BIO3450: Genetics, with laboratory
  • BIO4350: Evolution
  • BIO4803: Senior Seminar in Biology

Please Note: Course Numbering is undergoing changes – All biology majors must complete up to 14 elective credits in biology courses at or above the 300(3000) level in addition to the required biology core. No more than one semester of BIO333, BIO334, BIO398, or BIO399 may be counted towards satisfying the requirements of the biology major. BIO103 carries biology major credit only for students in bio-education to comply with state certification requirements. All biology majors must also complete the required core in allied fields:

  • CHE1600: General Chemistry I, with review and laboratory
  • CHE1700: General Chemistry II, with review and laboratory
  • CHE2400: Organic Chemistry I, with review and laboratory
  • CHE2500: Organic Chemistry II, with review and laboratory
  • MAT1840: College Algebra and Trigonometry and
  • MAT2400: Calculus I or
  • MAT2400: Calculus I and
  • MAT2500: Calculus II, with laboratory
  • PHY1600: General Physics I, with review and laboratory
  • PHY1800: General Physics II, with review and laboratory

Plus the following courses: 

  • MIS1220: Applications of Microcomputers
  • MAT2004: Biostatistics

By appropriate selection of electives, students may focus their studies following areas: 

  • Bio-Education (see education department information for professional requirements for teacher education)
  • Biomedical (for students interested in medical professions)
  • Cell and Molecular Biology
  • Ecology/Environmental Science
  • General Biology
  • Zoology

Biology Minor Requirements

  •  BIO2400: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy, with laboratory
  • BIO2420: Botany, with laboratory
  • BIO2430: Microbiology, with laboratory
  • BIO3440: Ecology, with laboratory
  • 3000-level Biology elective, with laboratory as required

 

Course Descriptions

A comparative study of the classes of vertebrates, this course emphasizes the evolution of morphological characteristics. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

This is an introductory course in botany and includes study of algal, fungal, and plant diversity, as well as plant physiology. Laboratory sessions investigate taxonomic diversity, anatomy and physiology, and experiments in plant growth and reproduction. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee, and one required field trip.

The student will study the biology of representative microorganisms and viruses with emphasis on prokaryotic structure, metabolism, genetics, and diversity. Food microbiology is also covered. The laboratory focuses on the diversity and identification of bacteria. One 3-1/2 hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

Description pending.

This course covers the fundamental concepts of how organisms interact with each other and with their environment. There is use of taxonomy and practice in finding key characteristics of organisms to focus on keying and identifying organisms in the lab and in the field. Also, quantitative analysis of data is performed regarding basic ecological concepts in the lab, in the field, and through the use of software. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee and three field trips per semester.

This course covers the principles of genetics from Mendel to modern genetic techniques used in biotechnology. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

Mechanisms of variation and adaptation in individuals and populations will be examined, with emphasis on historical and current concepts of speciation and systematics.

The student will present seminars on current topics of biological research. Oral presentation techniques will be emphasized and a term paper is required.

This course presents fundamental principles of chemistry, including a study of atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, and the states of matter. It is an introductory course for science majors, and is the course required for admission to medical school. It may also be used to satisfy the college’s general requirement in science. Co-enrollment in CHE211R (review) is required.

A continuation of CHE1600, this course includes a study of chemical kinetics, acids and bases, equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and the chemistry of aqueous solutions. Co-enrollment in CHE212R (review) is required

This course is an integrated study of the bonding and structure of organic compounds, with emphasis on reactions, reaction mechanisms, and synthesis, with an introduction to organic spectroscopy.

This course is a continuation of CHE2400.

This course is an in-depth survey of algebraic and geometric problem solving techniques, including solutions of polynomial equations and inequalities, curve sketching techniques, and trigonometry from the triangular and functional standpoint. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of both a graphing calculator and computer software.

This course discusses limits, continuity, derivatives, maximum and minimum problems, related rates, and Mean Value Theorem. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of a graphing calculator and computer software.

This course includes the study of integration, applications of the definite integral, transcendental functions, and methods of integration. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of a graphing calculator.

This course presents the principles of statistics as applied to the analysis of biological and health data. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, non-parametric statistics, and regression analysis. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of computer software.

This course is a survey of microcomputers as used in today’s environment. The student will become familiar with current trends and uses of microcomputers as well as hands-on exposure to spreadsheets, databases, word processors, and operating systems. Students will be required to develop applications in each of the software areas.

This is a basic course that covers the fundamental principles of mechanics, vibration, and thermodynamics. Newton’s laws of motion will be applied to a broad range of practical problems involving real phenomena. The laws of thermodynamics will be utilized to study thermal processes and properties. Students will learn to develop working equations from basic concepts in order to solve problems. The course is taught without calculus.

This is a continuation of PHY1600 covering the fundamental principles of electricity, magnetism, light, and modern physics. The course is taught without calculus.

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