Education

Minor

Undergraduates seeking a Minor in Education and seeking Massachusetts licensure in education (early childhood education, elementary education, moderate disabilities, and nine subjects on the middle school and secondary education level) are required to complete a major appropriate to their field of licensure.  Upon successfully completing the BA or BS degree with a Minor in Education, students may be eligible for the 4+1 program leading to the MEd degree.  In order to qualify for the 5th, Graduate year, students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.  In order to qualify for Student Teaching during the 5th year, students must have passed all MTELs (Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure) required for the license. The practicum is a requirement for licensure and is necessary for the fulfillment of the requirements for NASDTEC credentialing. Students may complete the MEd degree without licensure.

Formal acceptance into the fifth-year education program will be granted to students who have achieved the following:

  • Successful completion of a major appropriate to the field of licensure sought and the prescribed education coursework
  • The maintenance of a 3.0 cumulative average or better
  • Successful completion of required pre-practicum experiences
  • To be accepted as a licensure candidate, passage of the Communication and Literacy Skills section of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL). Students may be accepted as a ‘non-licensure’ candidate until the passage of the MTELs
  • Completion of an application to the program
  • Two recommendations from content area faculty

 

In the classroom. In the workforce.

SOPHOMORE

FALL

  • EDU2102, Introduction to Education Fieldwork (2 credits)
  • EDU2103, MTEL Preparation (1 credits)

SPRING

JUNIOR

FALL

  • EDU3201, Principles of Education:  Mid/Sec OR EDU3200, Principles of Education:  Early Child/Elem/Mod Dis (3 credits)

SPRING

  • EDU3321, Intro to Special Ed (3 credits)

SENIOR

FALL

  • EDU4300, Teaching Reading and Language Arts: Early Child/Elem/Mod Dis (3 credits)
  • EDU4301, Teaching Math: Early Child/Elem/Mod Dis (3 credits)
  • EDU4340, Teaching Child and Adolescent Lit: (3 credits)

SPRING

  • EDU4320, Language Arts: Mid/Sec (3 credits)
  • EDU4341, Assessment & Curriculum (3 credits)
  • EDU4302, Multi-Sensory Teaching of Lang Skills (3 credits)
  • EDU4311, Teaching Math: Mid/Sec (3 credits)

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS

  • PSY1401, General Psychology I
  • PSY1501, General Psychology II
  • PSY2450, Developmental Psychology
  • PSY2620, Educational Psychology
  • PSY2408, Adolescent Psychology: Mid Sec/ Mod Dis

NOTES

  • Students in their Sophomore year need to choose what grade level and subject matter they wish to teach in order to select the correct courses.
  • Students in their Sophomore year need to decide if they want to work in Special Education in order to select the correct courses.
  • Decisions regarding grade level, subject matter, and Special Education will dictate which courses students will need to take.
  • Upon successful completion of courses, a grade point average of 3.0 and a passing score on the Communication and Literacy MTEL are required for consideration of acceptance into the 5th Graduate School year.

Course Descriptions

A one-credit course offered for sophomores (and junior transfer students) in the fall for undergrad Education minors. This course is designed to introduce students to public school settings in suburban and rural locations. Partnerships are established with five school districts and students will take fieldtrips to the various locations for classroom observations (early pre-practicum fieldwork). A lab fee will be charged to cover transportation costs.

The MTEL preparatory course is a seven-week, one-credit course that prepares students for the communication and literacy portion of the Massachusetts Test for Educator Licensure (MTEL). While the course focuses on writing, reading, and the various types of MTEL questions, emphasis is placed on writing fundamentals (grammar, mechanics, punctuation) and on reading comprehension. Students write and edit essays, read and summarize passages, learn test-taking strategies, and take practice exams. Students take the Communication and Literacy MTELs at the conclusion of the course. Lab fee is charged.

An introduction to teaching that examines the dispositions, knowledge and skills of the 21st century educator. An overview of American education will focus on historical and contemporary trends in teaching, learning, and curriculum. Diversity in American classrooms, including students with special needs, limited English proficiency, economic or social disadvantage, gifted and talented, etc., will be examined in keeping with current practices such as, inclusion, differentiated instruction, ELL support, and response to intervention. Students will engage in initial lesson plan construction selecting topics in science, Massachusetts geography and social studies. Reference to the principles and learning standards of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks (CCSS) is required. Field experience required.

An introduction to teaching that examines the dispositions, knowledge and skills of the 21st century educator. An overview of American education will focus on historical and contemporary trends in teaching, learning, and curriculum. Diversity in American classrooms, including students with special needs, limited English proficiency, economic or social disadvantage, gifted and talented, etc., will be examined in keeping with current practices such as, inclusion, differentiated instruction, ELL support, and response to intervention. Students will engage in initial lesson plan construction selecting topics in science, Massachusetts geography and social studies. Reference to the principles and learning standards of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks (CCSS) is required. Field experience required.

The purpose of this course is to investigate developmental factors and influences that impact child growth and learning for the special needs child. The course will provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to identify those children who have special needs and study the ways and means that may be used to aid these children. Students will explore current early identification strategies and techniques as well as Response To Intervention (RTI) procedures used to facilitate struggling learners in the educational setting. State regulations (Chapt. 766) and Federal requirements (IDEA) will be covered in depth, as well as information about services provided and/or available to students by other agencies. An analysis of local/district/state data will be included. Students will acquire knowledge of how to use technology and assistive technology with special needs students and its curriculum implications. This includes Autism and Attention Deficit Disorder (w/wo hyperactivity). Course participants will gain an understanding of the educational problems which mild, moderated or severe handicaps imposes on a special needs child or youth and how this applies to the preparation and implementation of the Individual Educational Plan (IEP).

A survey of theories, practices, and techniques of reading instruction for children in grades preK-8. Various methods and materials used in the teaching-learning process will be examined, including the informal diagnosis and assessment of reading skills. The Massachusetts English Language Arts Curriculum Frameworks, as well as related documents for English language learners and guidelines for special education students will be central to developing and presenting reading strategy lessons. Instructional accommodations for diverse learners will explore methods in sheltered English language immersion, special education, gifted and talented enrichment, and compensatory strategies for rural and urban poverty populations. Field work experiences and a diagnostic case-study assignment will integrate all course components. On-line research of the National Reading Panel Report and other professional sources will supplement course learning. Field experience is required.

Prospective educators will examine theoretical and developmental models of mathematics instruction in order to plan and implement effective instruction based on the diverse cognitive, language, and developmental needs of students. Using technology to access national and local district assessment data, students will analyze and identify areas of need within the mathematics curriculum and engage in instructional decision-making. Demonstrations and micro-teaching will reference the Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Framework. Field experiences are required for initial licensure.

This course addresses the developmental reading and language needs of the middle and high school student in the content area classroom spanning from “learning to read” to “reading to learn.” The strategic use of multiple texts, including 21st century technology literacies, will be presented using micro-teaching lessons to demonstrate effective practice. Using technology to access national and local assessment data, students will analyze and identify areas of need within the English language arts and their intended subject area to guide instructional decision-making. Instructional accommodations for diverse learners will explore methods in sheltered English language immersion, special education, gifted and talented enrichment, and compensatory strategies for rural and urban poverty populations. Field work experiences and a diagnostic case-study assignment will integrate all course components. On-line research of the National Reading Panel Report and other professional sources will be integral to course learning. Field experience is required.

This course examines a full range of effective early childhood programs and curriculum. State curriculum documents, along with a variety of assessments, materials and teaching strategies are examined for their effectiveness in addressing the diverse cognitive, language, and developmental characteristics of young learners. Particular consideration is given to special needs of children with limited English proficiency, cognitive or language deficits, learning disabilities, economic or social disadvantage, etc. The administration and interpretation of informal and formal screening and evaluation procedures will be used to assess individual students. Assessment findings are used to plan instruction for young children with and without special needs.

This course will examine the basics of a multisensory, structured language curriculum for teaching reading, writing, spelling, comprehension and composition to diverse groups of students including those with reading problems, language disorders, cognitive disabilities, mild and moderate specific learning disabilities, and English Language Learners. There will be hands-on experience as well as exemplary lessons exploring best practice strategies to facilitate the development of reading and language skills. The students will learn how and where the sounds of English are made; how to introduce phonemic awareness activities; and how to teach sound-symbol associations in a logical, scientific way according to latest research. Students explore the qualities of children’s and adolescent literature, including the various genres, meaning, voices, and visual elements that are central to engaging learners through literature. Students will become proficient with regard to terminology relating to instructional standards and techniques in the areas of reading, written language, and content areas such as Science and Social Studies. They will become familiar with the use of identified best practice strategies for use in both specialized and the general education inclusive settings.

This course provides a study of secondary and middle mathematics curricula and various methods for planning instruction for all learners and evaluation in the classroom. A survey of current textbooks, instructional materials, and testing materials will be included. Changes and developments in the area of teaching mathematics will be addressed utilizing the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and current professional literature. Field experience is required.

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