Education Minor for 4+1 Program

Minor

Note: This minor is only available to students who entered the 4+1 program before fall 2019

Undergraduate students who entered the 4+1 program before fall 2019 are not eligible to change to the new Education minor. Students in the 4+1 program must continue with their current program of study and they remain eligible to continue into the fifth-year program, provided all requirements for entry have been met. If a student wishes to pursue the new minor but had entered the College before fall 2019, permission from the program advisor and dean are required, with the understanding that the new Education minor program of study could lead to additional course hours and delay graduation. Courses from the 4+1 program are not transferrable to the Education minor. The programs of study for both the 4+1 program and the new Education minor are below.

Students who have entered the College after fall 2019 are not eligible for the 4+1 program and are directed to the new Education minor.

Undergraduates seeking a minor in Education and seeking Massachusetts licensure in education (early childhood, elementary, moderate disabilities or nine subjects at the Middle or Secondary level) are required to complete a major appropriate to their field of licensure.

Upon successfully completing the BA or BS degree with a minor in Education, students may be eligible for the 4+1 program leading to the MEd degree. (In order to qualify for the 5th, (graduate) year, students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. In order to qualify for student teaching during the 5th year, students must have passed all required MTELs (Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure). Student teaching is a requirement for licensure and is necessary for the fulfillment of the requirements for NASDTEC credentialing. Students may complete the MEd degree without licensure.

Requirements for teacher licensure are based on Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education regulations. The programs in education are also aligned with the National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification (NASDTEC).

As pre-education candidates, students begin their program by completing their general education requirements and coursework in a content area major drawn from among the liberal arts majors.

Formal acceptance into the fifth-year education program will be granted to students who have achieved the following:

  • Successful completion of a major appropriate to the field of licensure sought and the prescribed education coursework
  • The maintenance of a 3.0 cumulative average or better
  • Successful completion of required pre-practicum experiences
  • To be accepted as a licensure candidate, passage of the Communication and Literacy Skills section of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL). Students may be accepted as a ‘non-licensure’ candidate until the passage of the MTELs
  • Completion of an application to the program
  • Two recommendations from content area faculty

Prior to the acceptance into the student teaching practicum, all candidates must pass the appropriate subject matter knowledge section(s) of the MTEL for the license they are seeking. Candidates who do not pass these tests may complete their degree with “non-licensure” status. They will not be eligible for teacher licensure in Massachusetts nor be eligible for the NASDTEC stamp providing reciprocity with other states.

Being a part of the Education program at AIC has changed my life. My professors have supported and guided me every
step of the way, building in me the strength, compassion, courage, and motivation I want to pass on to my future students. They have taught me more than I could have imagined—about myself and the world.

—Alison Bates ’14 Education/Liberal Studies Student

What You’ll Learn

Successful candidates will explore teaching practices and learning theories as well as participate in real-time classroom activities with licensed teachers.

three students walking through Springfield campus quad

Future Studies

You’ll receive a Bachelor’s Degree with a minor in education in four years, and a Master of Education degree after an additional fifth year.

Student studying intently

Career Opportunities

You’ll be provided with the most efficient and cost-effective path to obtain the degrees and licenses you need to start teaching and achieve success.

Early Childhood Education (Pre-Kindergarten-2) For Students With and Without Disabilities

  • EDU2102* Introduction to Education: Fieldwork
  • EDU2103 MTEL Preparation
  • EDU3200* Principles of Education: Early Childhood, Elementary, Moderate Disabilities
  • EDU3321 Introduction to Special Education
  • EDU4300* Teaching Reading and Language Arts: Early Childhood, Elementary, Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8)
  • EDU4301* Teaching Mathematics: Early Childhood, Elementary, Moderate Disabilities
  • EDU4302 Multisensory Teaching of Language Skills
  • EDU4341 Assessment and Curriculum for Early Childhood
  • Also required: PSY1401, PSY1501, PSY2450, 2620

Elementary Education (Grades 1-6)

  • EDU2102* Introduction to Education: Fieldwork
  • EDU2103 MTEL Preparation
  • EDU3200* Principles of Education: Early Childhood, Elementary, Moderate Disabilities
  • EDU3321 Introduction to Special Education
  • EDU4300* Teaching Reading and Language Arts: Early Childhood, Elementary, Moderate Disabilities (PreK-Eighth)
  • EDU4301* Teaching Mathematics: Early Childhood, Elementary, Moderate Disabilities
  • EDU4302 Multisensory Teaching of Language Skills
  • Also required: PSY1401, PSY1501, PSY2450, PSY2620

Middle/Secondary Education (Middle School 5-8, Secondary 8-12)

  • EDU2102* Introduction to Education: Fieldwork
  • EDU2103 MTEL Preparation
  • EDU3201* Principles of Education: Middle/Secondary
  • EDU3321 Introduction to Special Education
  • EDU4311* Teaching Mathematics: Secondary or Middle (math candidates only)
  • EDU4320* Reading and Communication: Middle and Secondary
  • Also required: PSY1401, PSY1501, PSY2408, PSY2450, PSY2620

Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8 or 5-12)

  • EDU2102* Introduction to Education: Fieldwork
  • EDU2103 MTEL Preparation
  • EDU3321 Introduction to Special Education
  • EDU4301* Teaching Mathematics: Early Childhood, Elementary, Moderate Disabilities
  • EDU4302 Multisensory Teaching of Language Skills
  • Choose one from the following courses based on area of study:
    • EDU3200* Principles of Education: Early Childhood, Elementary, Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8)
    • EDU3201* Principles of Education: Middle/Secondary
  • Choose one or both from the following courses based on area study:
    • EDU4300* Teaching Reading and Language Arts: Early Childhood, Elementary, Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8)
    • EDU4320* Reading and Communication: Middle and Secondary
  • Also required: PSY1401, PSY1501, PSY2450 and PSY2620; PSY2408 (5-12 candidates only)

*Field experience required

Upon completion of the above coursework, students apply to the fifth-year MEd program.

Early Childhood Education (Pre-Kindergarten-2) For Students With and Without Disabilities

A one-credit course offered for sophomores (and junior transfer students) in the fall for undergrad Education minors. This course is designed to introduce students to public school settings in suburban and rural locations. Partnerships are established with five school districts and students will take fieldtrips to the various locations for classroom observations (early pre-practicum fieldwork). A lab fee will be charged to cover transportation costs.

The MTEL preparatory course is a seven-week, one-credit course that prepares students for the communication and literacy portion of the Massachusetts Test for Educator Licensure (MTEL). While the course focuses on writing, reading, and the various types of MTEL questions, emphasis is placed on writing fundamentals (grammar, mechanics, punctuation) and on reading comprehension. Students write and edit essays, read and summarize passages, learn test-taking strategies, and take practice exams. Students take the Communication and Literacy MTELs at the conclusion of the course. Lab fee is charged.

An introduction to teaching that examines the dispositions, knowledge and skills of the 21st century educator. An overview of American education will focus on historical and contemporary trends in teaching, learning, and curriculum. Diversity in American classrooms, including students with special needs, limited English proficiency, economic or social disadvantage, gifted and talented, etc., will be examined in keeping with current practices such as, inclusion, differentiated instruction, ELL support, and response to intervention. Students will engage in initial lesson plan construction selecting topics in science, Massachusetts geography and social studies. Reference to the principles and learning standards of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks (CCSS) is required. Field experience required.

The purpose of this course is to investigate developmental factors and influences that impact child growth and learning for the special needs child. The course will provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to identify those children who have special needs and study the ways and means that may be used to aid these children. Students will explore current early identification strategies and techniques as well as Response To Intervention (RTI) procedures used to facilitate struggling learners in the educational setting. State regulations (Chapt. 766) and Federal requirements (IDEA) will be covered in depth, as well as information about services provided and/or available to students by other agencies. An analysis of local/district/state data will be included. Students will acquire knowledge of how to use technology and assistive technology with special needs students and its curriculum implications. This includes Autism and Attention Deficit Disorder (w/wo hyperactivity). Course participants will gain an understanding of the educational problems which mild, moderated or severe handicaps imposes on a special needs child or youth and how this applies to the preparation and implementation of the Individual Educational Plan (IEP).

Prospective educators will examine theoretical and developmental models of mathematics instruction in order to plan and implement effective instruction based on the diverse cognitive, language, and developmental needs of students. Using technology to access national and local district assessment data, students will analyze and identify areas of need within the mathematics curriculum and engage in instructional decision-making. Demonstrations and micro-teaching will reference the Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Framework. Field experiences are required for initial licensure.

This course will examine the basics of a multisensory, structured language curriculum for teaching reading, writing, spelling, comprehension and composition to diverse groups of students including those with reading problems, language disorders, cognitive disabilities, mild and moderate specific learning disabilities, and English Language Learners. There will be hands-on experience as well as exemplary lessons exploring best practice strategies to facilitate the development of reading and language skills. The students will learn how and where the sounds of English are made; how to introduce phonemic awareness activities; and how to teach sound-symbol associations in a logical, scientific way according to latest research. Students explore the qualities of children’s and adolescent literature, including the various genres, meaning, voices, and visual elements that are central to engaging learners through literature. Students will become proficient with regard to terminology relating to instructional standards and techniques in the areas of reading, written language, and content areas such as Science and Social Studies. They will become familiar with the use of identified best practice strategies for use in both specialized and the general education inclusive settings.

This course examines a full range of effective early childhood programs and curriculum. State curriculum documents, along with a variety of assessments, materials and teaching strategies are examined for their effectiveness in addressing the diverse cognitive, language, and developmental characteristics of young learners. Particular consideration is given to special needs of children with limited English proficiency, cognitive or language deficits, learning disabilities, economic or social disadvantage, etc. The administration and interpretation of informal and formal screening and evaluation procedures will be used to assess individual students. Assessment findings are used to plan instruction for young children with and without special needs.

This course covers the basic principles of behavior, that make up the foundation of psychology. Emphasis is placed on the biological basis of behavior, sensation, perception, learning, language, memory, thinking, infancy, and childhood. The methods of inquiry used in psychology are also emphasized.

continuation of PSY1401, with an emphasis on the application of psychology to contemporary life. Topics include: motivation and emotion; social behavior; adolescence and adulthood; personality; abnormal behavior and psychotherapy; stress, health, and psychology of the workplace.

The purpose of this course is to examine the concepts of human development, from conception to old age. Specifically, the course looks at how physical, cognitive, and socioemotional factors interact to influence learning, intelligence, language development, and the growth of personality. Major theories and the research that supports or refutes them are examined.

This course examines aspects of psychology related to human learning and the educational process. The course surveys topics such as learning, thinking, memory, intelligence, creativity, testing, motivation, and mental development that are vital to teachers and valuable to anyone engaged in learning.

Elementary Education (Grades 1-6)

A one-credit course offered for sophomores (and junior transfer students) in the fall for undergrad Education minors. This course is designed to introduce students to public school settings in suburban and rural locations. Partnerships are established with five school districts and students will take fieldtrips to the various locations for classroom observations (early pre-practicum fieldwork). A lab fee will be charged to cover transportation costs.

The MTEL preparatory course is a seven-week, one-credit course that prepares students for the communication and literacy portion of the Massachusetts Test for Educator Licensure (MTEL). While the course focuses on writing, reading, and the various types of MTEL questions, emphasis is placed on writing fundamentals (grammar, mechanics, punctuation) and on reading comprehension. Students write and edit essays, read and summarize passages, learn test-taking strategies, and take practice exams. Students take the Communication and Literacy MTELs at the conclusion of the course. Lab fee is charged.

An introduction to teaching that examines the dispositions, knowledge and skills of the 21st century educator. An overview of American education will focus on historical and contemporary trends in teaching, learning, and curriculum. Diversity in American classrooms, including students with special needs, limited English proficiency, economic or social disadvantage, gifted and talented, etc., will be examined in keeping with current practices such as, inclusion, differentiated instruction, ELL support, and response to intervention. Students will engage in initial lesson plan construction selecting topics in science, Massachusetts geography and social studies. Reference to the principles and learning standards of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks (CCSS) is required. Field experience required.

The purpose of this course is to investigate developmental factors and influences that impact child growth and learning for the special needs child. The course will provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to identify those children who have special needs and study the ways and means that may be used to aid these children. Students will explore current early identification strategies and techniques as well as Response To Intervention (RTI) procedures used to facilitate struggling learners in the educational setting. State regulations (Chapt. 766) and Federal requirements (IDEA) will be covered in depth, as well as information about services provided and/or available to students by other agencies. An analysis of local/district/state data will be included. Students will acquire knowledge of how to use technology and assistive technology with special needs students and its curriculum implications. This includes Autism and Attention Deficit Disorder (w/wo hyperactivity). Course participants will gain an understanding of the educational problems which mild, moderated or severe handicaps imposes on a special needs child or youth and how this applies to the preparation and implementation of the Individual Educational Plan (IEP).

A survey of theories, practices, and techniques of reading instruction for children in grades preK-8. Various methods and materials used in the teaching-learning process will be examined, including the informal diagnosis and assessment of reading skills. The Massachusetts English Language Arts Curriculum Frameworks, as well as related documents for English language learners and guidelines for special education students will be central to developing and presenting reading strategy lessons. Instructional accommodations for diverse learners will explore methods in sheltered English language immersion, special education, gifted and talented enrichment, and compensatory strategies for rural and urban poverty populations. Field work experiences and a diagnostic case-study assignment will integrate all course components. On-line research of the National Reading Panel Report and other professional sources will supplement course learning. Field experience is required.

Prospective educators will examine theoretical and developmental models of mathematics instruction in order to plan and implement effective instruction based on the diverse cognitive, language, and developmental needs of students. Using technology to access national and local district assessment data, students will analyze and identify areas of need within the mathematics curriculum and engage in instructional decision-making. Demonstrations and micro-teaching will reference the Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Framework. Field experiences are required for initial licensure.

This course will examine the basics of a multisensory, structured language curriculum for teaching reading, writing, spelling, comprehension and composition to diverse groups of students including those with reading problems, language disorders, cognitive disabilities, mild and moderate specific learning disabilities, and English Language Learners. There will be hands-on experience as well as exemplary lessons exploring best practice strategies to facilitate the development of reading and language skills. The students will learn how and where the sounds of English are made; how to introduce phonemic awareness activities; and how to teach sound-symbol associations in a logical, scientific way according to latest research. Students explore the qualities of children’s and adolescent literature, including the various genres, meaning, voices, and visual elements that are central to engaging learners through literature. Students will become proficient with regard to terminology relating to instructional standards and techniques in the areas of reading, written language, and content areas such as Science and Social Studies. They will become familiar with the use of identified best practice strategies for use in both specialized and the general education inclusive settings.

This course covers the basic principles of behavior, that make up the foundation of psychology. Emphasis is placed on the biological basis of behavior, sensation, perception, learning, language, memory, thinking, infancy, and childhood. The methods of inquiry used in psychology are also emphasized.

continuation of PSY1401, with an emphasis on the application of psychology to contemporary life. Topics include: motivation and emotion; social behavior; adolescence and adulthood; personality; abnormal behavior and psychotherapy; stress, health, and psychology of the workplace.

The purpose of this course is to examine the concepts of human development, from conception to old age. Specifically, the course looks at how physical, cognitive, and socioemotional factors interact to influence learning, intelligence, language development, and the growth of personality. Major theories and the research that supports or refutes them are examined.

This course examines aspects of psychology related to human learning and the educational process. The course surveys topics such as learning, thinking, memory, intelligence, creativity, testing, motivation, and mental development that are vital to teachers and valuable to anyone engaged in learning.

Middle/Secondary Education (Middle School 5-8, Secondary 8-12)

A one-credit course offered for sophomores (and junior transfer students) in the fall for undergrad Education minors. This course is designed to introduce students to public school settings in suburban and rural locations. Partnerships are established with five school districts and students will take fieldtrips to the various locations for classroom observations (early pre-practicum fieldwork). A lab fee will be charged to cover transportation costs.

The MTEL preparatory course is a seven-week, one-credit course that prepares students for the communication and literacy portion of the Massachusetts Test for Educator Licensure (MTEL). While the course focuses on writing, reading, and the various types of MTEL questions, emphasis is placed on writing fundamentals (grammar, mechanics, punctuation) and on reading comprehension. Students write and edit essays, read and summarize passages, learn test-taking strategies, and take practice exams. Students take the Communication and Literacy MTELs at the conclusion of the course. Lab fee is charged.

An introduction to teaching that examines the dispositions, knowledge and skills of the 21st century educator. An overview of American education will focus on historical and contemporary trends in teaching, learning, and curriculum. Diversity in American classrooms, including students with special needs, limited English proficiency, economic or social disadvantage, gifted and talented, etc., will be examined in keeping with current practices such as, inclusion, differentiated instruction, ELL support, and response to intervention. Students will engage in initial lesson plan construction selecting topics in science, Massachusetts geography and social studies. Reference to the principles and learning standards of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks (CCSS) is required. Field experience required.

The purpose of this course is to investigate developmental factors and influences that impact child growth and learning for the special needs child. The course will provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to identify those children who have special needs and study the ways and means that may be used to aid these children. Students will explore current early identification strategies and techniques as well as Response To Intervention (RTI) procedures used to facilitate struggling learners in the educational setting. State regulations (Chapt. 766) and Federal requirements (IDEA) will be covered in depth, as well as information about services provided and/or available to students by other agencies. An analysis of local/district/state data will be included. Students will acquire knowledge of how to use technology and assistive technology with special needs students and its curriculum implications. This includes Autism and Attention Deficit Disorder (w/wo hyperactivity). Course participants will gain an understanding of the educational problems which mild, moderated or severe handicaps imposes on a special needs child or youth and how this applies to the preparation and implementation of the Individual Educational Plan (IEP).

This course provides a study of secondary and middle mathematics curricula and various methods for planning instruction for all learners and evaluation in the classroom. A survey of current textbooks, instructional materials, and testing materials will be included. Changes and developments in the area of teaching mathematics will be addressed utilizing the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and current professional literature. Field experience is required.

This course addresses the developmental reading and language needs of the middle and high school student in the content area classroom spanning from “learning to read” to “reading to learn.” The strategic use of multiple texts, including 21st century technology literacies, will be presented using micro-teaching lessons to demonstrate effective practice. Using technology to access national and local assessment data, students will analyze and identify areas of need within the English language arts and their intended subject area to guide instructional decision-making. Instructional accommodations for diverse learners will explore methods in sheltered English language immersion, special education, gifted and talented enrichment, and compensatory strategies for rural and urban poverty populations. Field work experiences and a diagnostic case-study assignment will integrate all course components. On-line research of the National Reading Panel Report and other professional sources will be integral to course learning. Field experience is required.

This course covers the basic principles of behavior, that make up the foundation of psychology. Emphasis is placed on the biological basis of behavior, sensation, perception, learning, language, memory, thinking, infancy, and childhood. The methods of inquiry used in psychology are also emphasized.

continuation of PSY1401, with an emphasis on the application of psychology to contemporary life. Topics include: motivation and emotion; social behavior; adolescence and adulthood; personality; abnormal behavior and psychotherapy; stress, health, and psychology of the workplace.

This course is a study of adolescent behavior, including current theories concerning the nature of adolescence. Emphasis is placed on physical, emotional, and cognitive forces, and how they interact to shape the adolescent personality.

The purpose of this course is to examine the concepts of human development, from conception to old age. Specifically, the course looks at how physical, cognitive, and socioemotional factors interact to influence learning, intelligence, language development, and the growth of personality. Major theories and the research that supports or refutes them are examined.

This course examines aspects of psychology related to human learning and the educational process. The course surveys topics such as learning, thinking, memory, intelligence, creativity, testing, motivation, and mental development that are vital to teachers and valuable to anyone engaged in learning.

Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8 or 5-12)

A one-credit course offered for sophomores (and junior transfer students) in the fall for undergrad Education minors. This course is designed to introduce students to public school settings in suburban and rural locations. Partnerships are established with five school districts and students will take fieldtrips to the various locations for classroom observations (early pre-practicum fieldwork). A lab fee will be charged to cover transportation costs.

The MTEL preparatory course is a seven-week, one-credit course that prepares students for the communication and literacy portion of the Massachusetts Test for Educator Licensure (MTEL). While the course focuses on writing, reading, and the various types of MTEL questions, emphasis is placed on writing fundamentals (grammar, mechanics, punctuation) and on reading comprehension. Students write and edit essays, read and summarize passages, learn test-taking strategies, and take practice exams. Students take the Communication and Literacy MTELs at the conclusion of the course. Lab fee is charged.

The purpose of this course is to investigate developmental factors and influences that impact child growth and learning for the special needs child. The course will provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to identify those children who have special needs and study the ways and means that may be used to aid these children. Students will explore current early identification strategies and techniques as well as Response To Intervention (RTI) procedures used to facilitate struggling learners in the educational setting. State regulations (Chapt. 766) and Federal requirements (IDEA) will be covered in depth, as well as information about services provided and/or available to students by other agencies. An analysis of local/district/state data will be included. Students will acquire knowledge of how to use technology and assistive technology with special needs students and its curriculum implications. This includes Autism and Attention Deficit Disorder (w/wo hyperactivity). Course participants will gain an understanding of the educational problems which mild, moderated or severe handicaps imposes on a special needs child or youth and how this applies to the preparation and implementation of the Individual Educational Plan (IEP).

Prospective educators will examine theoretical and developmental models of mathematics instruction in order to plan and implement effective instruction based on the diverse cognitive, language, and developmental needs of students. Using technology to access national and local district assessment data, students will analyze and identify areas of need within the mathematics curriculum and engage in instructional decision-making. Demonstrations and micro-teaching will reference the Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Framework. Field experiences are required for initial licensure.

This course will examine the basics of a multisensory, structured language curriculum for teaching reading, writing, spelling, comprehension and composition to diverse groups of students including those with reading problems, language disorders, cognitive disabilities, mild and moderate specific learning disabilities, and English Language Learners. There will be hands-on experience as well as exemplary lessons exploring best practice strategies to facilitate the development of reading and language skills. The students will learn how and where the sounds of English are made; how to introduce phonemic awareness activities; and how to teach sound-symbol associations in a logical, scientific way according to latest research. Students explore the qualities of children’s and adolescent literature, including the various genres, meaning, voices, and visual elements that are central to engaging learners through literature. Students will become proficient with regard to terminology relating to instructional standards and techniques in the areas of reading, written language, and content areas such as Science and Social Studies. They will become familiar with the use of identified best practice strategies for use in both specialized and the general education inclusive settings.

An introduction to teaching that examines the dispositions, knowledge and skills of the 21st century educator. An overview of American education will focus on historical and contemporary trends in teaching, learning, and curriculum. Diversity in American classrooms, including students with special needs, limited English proficiency, economic or social disadvantage, gifted and talented, etc., will be examined in keeping with current practices such as, inclusion, differentiated instruction, ELL support, and response to intervention. Students will engage in initial lesson plan construction selecting topics in science, Massachusetts geography and social studies. Reference to the principles and learning standards of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks (CCSS) is required. Field experience required.

An introduction to teaching that examines the dispositions, knowledge and skills of the 21st century educator. An overview of American education will focus on historical and contemporary trends in teaching, learning, and curriculum. Diversity in American classrooms, including students with special needs, limited English proficiency, economic or social disadvantage, gifted and talented, etc., will be examined in keeping with current practices such as, inclusion, differentiated instruction, ELL support, and response to intervention. Students will engage in initial lesson plan construction selecting topics in science, Massachusetts geography and social studies. Reference to the principles and learning standards of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks (CCSS) is required. Field experience required.

A survey of theories, practices, and techniques of reading instruction for children in grades preK-8. Various methods and materials used in the teaching-learning process will be examined, including the informal diagnosis and assessment of reading skills. The Massachusetts English Language Arts Curriculum Frameworks, as well as related documents for English language learners and guidelines for special education students will be central to developing and presenting reading strategy lessons. Instructional accommodations for diverse learners will explore methods in sheltered English language immersion, special education, gifted and talented enrichment, and compensatory strategies for rural and urban poverty populations. Field work experiences and a diagnostic case-study assignment will integrate all course components. On-line research of the National Reading Panel Report and other professional sources will supplement course learning. Field experience is required.

This course addresses the developmental reading and language needs of the middle and high school student in the content area classroom spanning from “learning to read” to “reading to learn.” The strategic use of multiple texts, including 21st century technology literacies, will be presented using micro-teaching lessons to demonstrate effective practice. Using technology to access national and local assessment data, students will analyze and identify areas of need within the English language arts and their intended subject area to guide instructional decision-making. Instructional accommodations for diverse learners will explore methods in sheltered English language immersion, special education, gifted and talented enrichment, and compensatory strategies for rural and urban poverty populations. Field work experiences and a diagnostic case-study assignment will integrate all course components. On-line research of the National Reading Panel Report and other professional sources will be integral to course learning. Field experience is required.

This course covers the basic principles of behavior, that make up the foundation of psychology. Emphasis is placed on the biological basis of behavior, sensation, perception, learning, language, memory, thinking, infancy, and childhood. The methods of inquiry used in psychology are also emphasized.

continuation of PSY1401, with an emphasis on the application of psychology to contemporary life. Topics include: motivation and emotion; social behavior; adolescence and adulthood; personality; abnormal behavior and psychotherapy; stress, health, and psychology of the workplace.

The purpose of this course is to examine the concepts of human development, from conception to old age. Specifically, the course looks at how physical, cognitive, and socioemotional factors interact to influence learning, intelligence, language development, and the growth of personality. Major theories and the research that supports or refutes them are examined.

This course examines aspects of psychology related to human learning and the educational process. The course surveys topics such as learning, thinking, memory, intelligence, creativity, testing, motivation, and mental development that are vital to teachers and valuable to anyone engaged in learning.

This course is a study of adolescent behavior, including current theories concerning the nature of adolescence. Emphasis is placed on physical, emotional, and cognitive forces, and how they interact to shape the adolescent personality.

Site map

© 2019 American International College