PCH7502 Practicum in Public Health II

The public health practicum is a supervised practical field experience designed to provide students the opportunity to develop and apply the knowledge and skills acquired in the academic program in a public health or health care environment in which a public health function is performed. Each student works with the faculty advisor to arrange and complete a satisfactory field experience that fulfills the program’s practicum requirements.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all prior MPH courses with the exception of the Capstone Seminar.

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PCH7201: Capstone Seminar in Public Health

As the capstone in the MPH degree, this course encourages students to reflect on the competencies they have acquired during the academic and internship phases of the MPH program, and it helps them to integrate their knowledge from all the public health disciplines and apply it to public health issues. In addition, we will incorporate this information into the job search and career development process. Faculty and students will discuss and provide joint feedback on identifying job opportunities, developing cover letters and resumes and preparing for interviews. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all prior courses in the MPH program.

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PCH7100: Research Methods in Public Health

This course is designed to introduce the graduate student in public health to the most widely used research methods in public health in the context of case studies and the peer-reviewed literature. Students will learn both quantitative and qualitative methods, as well as be introduced to mixed-methods research. Case studies and published research will be used to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches given different research questions, populations to be studied, and other methodological issues. Community-based participatory approaches to research will also be emphasized. Students will be expected to become critical readers of the public health literature and capable of identifying strengths and weaknesses of various studies.

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PCH6300: Health Care Program Development and Evaluation

This course will cover the core knowledge and skills involved in program planning and evaluation and will provide hands-on experience in both program development and evaluation design. An emphasis will be placed on using evidence-based approaches, assuring fidelity to those approaches, and involving stakeholders in both the design and evaluation of community-based interventions.

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PCH 6200: Leadership in Public Health

This class will expose students to the theory and concepts of leadership and organizational change. Students will assess their own strengths and weaknesses as leaders and develop their own plans for improvement. Class activities and exercises will focus on leadership skills, such as team building, conflict management, and negotiation. In addition to reviewing the literature on leadership and organizational change, the course will address ethical and political considerations in leadership within health care organizations, and in mobilizing community efforts, using case studies and group discussions.

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PCH6102: Health Care Systems and Financing

This course reviews the workings of health care systems. The primary focus will be on the U.S. health care system, but through comparison to other health care systems. Students will study aspects of health care systems pertaining to providers of care, hospitals, health insurance, health care financing, access to care, health and safety, and population health. The U.S. system will be reviewed though its history, the major influences on the system socially, politically and economically, and in terms of the specific populations such as the medically underserved, the uninsured, and other vulnerable groups. Students will become familiar with the operational aspects of the health care system at private, local, state and federal government levels, and will discuss the effects of variation in key components of the system on different populations.58

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PCH6100: Health Care Management and Policy

This course will introduce principles of public health management and administration and will involve case studies of real-life public health management situations. Students will examine cases of both public and private sector health and public health administration, and in the process will review finance and budgeting, human resources, health informatics, continuous quality improvement, health law and ethics, principles of leadership, and the importance of communication strategies. The health policy process and advocacy for health policy change and strategies for influencing policy will also be reviewed.

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PCH5202: Social and Behavioral Aspects of Population Health

In this course, students analyze public health issues from a social and behavioral sciences perspective and examine the strengths and weaknesses of particular theories for developing effective individual and population-based intervention programs. The course will address social and behavioral theories from psychology, sociology, anthropology and other disciplines that have influenced public health. Students will examine evidence related to the effectiveness of these theories in practice and apply these theories to examples of public health interventions.

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PCH5200: Introduction to Statistics for Health Care Professionals

Biostatistics is the development and application of statistical reasoning and methods in addressing, analyzing, and solving problems in public health; health care; and biomedical, clinical and population-based research. This course will focus on two areas, the ability to choose and employ the most appropriate statistics for research and evaluation in public health and developing the ability to critically interpret and apply results of statistical analyses contained in research studies. Students will have the opportunity to use the knowledge gained through the course in the interpretation and presentation of public health research.

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PCH5042: Public Health and The Environment

This course introduces environmental health for students in the Master’s in Public Health program. Environmental health will be discussed in terms of interactions between humans and their environments, how humans create environmental hazards, how those hazards affect human health, and how public health professionals and others can prevent or mediate present and future adverse health consequences due to those interactions with the environment. In this context, basic environmental health concepts will be covered, including the built, natural and altered environment, types of environmental hazards, toxicology, risk assessment and environmental epidemiology, regulation and communication of environmental health hazards and preventive measures. Opportunities and cases of environmental interventions that have the potential to improve human health will also be discussed.

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PCH5040: Principles of Epidemiology

Epidemiology is the science of public health, and an understanding of epidemiologic methods is important to both evaluating evidence for both clinical and public health practice. This course will review basic methods and principles of epidemiology, addressing content areas including, disease transmission, measures of frequency of disease and of mortality and morbidity, study designs, measurement of risk, bias in epidemiology and how to address it, surveillance, screening, genetic epidemiology, and epidemiology in the policy arena. Throughout the course students will review recent epidemiological research and representations in the popular press and how such research has been translated to medical or public health interventions.

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PCH5032: Ethical Issues in Public Health

Having a solid understanding of ethical principles and frameworks for resolving ethical concerns is crucial to working in public health. This course will introduce students to ethical principles and frameworks for analyzing ethical issues in public health, and will incorporate case studies to allow students to apply ethical reasoning to public health problems.

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PCH5030: Population Health, Social Determinants and Health Equity

This course introduces Master’s level students to the concept of “Population Health,” and the past and future roles of public health practitioners in improving the health of populations, with an emphasis on social determinants of health and issues of health equity. This course will begin with a review of the history of public health, and how the focus of population health efforts has evolved from the first efforts to control the spread of infectious disease to the current emphasis on social determinants of health and emerging infectious disease. We will discuss the delivery of health care in the U.S., and whether the current system or alternatives can best meet the goals of population health. Students will review and discuss specific approaches to improving population health that students will be exposed to in more depth later in the MPH curriculum. Students will be challenged to consider how affected populations can be engaged in the development and implementation of public health interventions, particularly those intended to have, “upstream” impact on social determinants of health and health equity.

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AIC4140

The final course supporting the AIC Plan for Excellence (APEX) will build upon AIC3140. In this course, students will learn how to integrate portfolios in interviews and professional networking, explore strategies to find employment, refine interview skills, start the implementation of their career goals, and understand budgeting and financial literacy. This course is required for all seniors and meets part of the Personal and Professional Development general education requirement. PREREQUISITE: AIC3140

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AIC3140

The third course supporting the AIC Plan for Excellence (APEX) will build upon AIC2140. In this course, students will refine their personal and professional goals, enhance their portfolios and resumes, develop interview skills and strategies, study multiculturalism in the workplace and global interactions, and investigate post-graduation options. This course is required for all juniors and meets part of the Personal and Professional Development general education requirement. PREREQUISITE: AIC2140

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aic2140

The second course supporting the AIC Plan for Excellence (APEX) will build upon the foundation of AIC1140. In this course, students will explore personal assessment and motivation, examine personal and professional goals, learn about internship and scholarship opportunities and their benefits, investigate leadership, and develop portfolios and a resume. This course is required for all sophomores and meets part of the Personal and Professional Development general education requirement. PREREQUISITE: AIC1140

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BIO3200: Human Functional Anatomy

This course introduces the student to basic concepts of kinesiology, biomechanics, and anatomy as applied to human motion. Primary areas of study will include the foundations of kinesiology, functional anatomy, posture, gait, and motion analysis. PREREQUISITE: BIO1200, BIO1201, BIO1210, BIO1211 or concurrent enrollment in BIO1210 and BIO1211, PHY 1600 or permission of instructor.

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EXS6800: Thesis

Students will be able to identify a problem or issue pertaining to the field of exercise science, perform a review of literature, carry out a scientific study and appropriately manage its data, apply research ethics involved in human research, and demonstrate proficient written and oral communication skills. Students must successfully defend their thesis to the research committee upon graduation. Please see student handbook/thesis manual for more details.

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EXS5690: Research Proposal Design

This course aids students in the development of their thesis proposals which leads to a Master of Science Degree in the Exercise Science Department. The full proposal must be completed by the end of the semester

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EXS5680: Statistics

Apply and interpret the results of various statistical procedures in both descriptive and inferential statistics for different research designs. Topics to be covered include sampling, hypothesis testing, variability, distributions, estimation, significance testing, as well as students will be able to critically review and analyze statistical procedures in current literature.

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EXS6700: Comprehensive Examinations

The strength and conditioning comprehensive examinations are essay based examinations which encompass the curriculum’s learning objectives and course material taught throughout the program. Each student must pass the exams in order to receive a Master of Science Degree in Exercise Science concentration Strength and Conditioning. Students are allowed ONLY ONE re-try on the examinations to complete this program requirement. See manual for more information.

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EXS6500: 400 Hour Internship (External)

The purpose of the internship requirement in the Master of Exercise Science Program concentration Strength and Conditioning is to offer students the opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge gained from the program and to apply them to a real-world experience. The off-campus experiences may include private practices, colleges/universities, as well as professional sport organizations. The internship experience gives students the opportunity to enhance their professional behavior via interaction with other professionals and athletes.

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EXS5240: Sports Nutrition

This course explores the nutritional parameters of sport performance in the athletic population. Topics covered include energy production, macro nutrients, vitamins and minerals, timing and composition of intakes, hydration, balanced diets, and weight management strategies related to physical activity.

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EXS5010: Research Methods

This course provides students with foundational knowledge of experimental research methods in Health Sciences. Topics to be covered include types of research, research design, data collection, analysis, validity, reliability, introduction to statistics, and ethics.

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EXS4600: Therapeutic Modalities

This course introduces students to the theoretical and clinical aspects of therapeutic modalities with regards to athletic rehabilitation. The physiological effects along with proper indications and contraindications are discussed with each modality. Proper application procedures are emphasized.

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EXS4500: Research Seminar

This course is designed to apply basic research skills to current literature in the field of Exercise Science. Students will gain an understanding of how to analyze different types of literature and what types of research designs are appropriate in various settings. An emphasis on APA style writing is also explored. PREREQUISITE: Junior Status

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EXS4400: Gerokinesiology

This course is designed to discuss the physiological processes of aging and how exercise impacts the aging process. Students will explore and develop exercise programs for the older adult population. The various cardiovascular, orthopedic, hormonal, and metabolic issues which commonly effect older adults are discussed and taken into consideration when developing an exercise plan.

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EXS4300: Exercise for Special Populations

This course examines the recommended procedures for exercise testing and prescription in healthy and diseased populations. The course covers basic physiology of each condition along with the impact of exercise training on the health outcomes of each population.

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EXS4100: Therapeutic Exercise

This course is designed to introduce and explore therapeutic exercise techniques. Students will gain an understanding of the theories and application methods of therapeutic treatments commonly used in rehabilitation programs on individuals recovering from exercise-induced injuries.

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EXS3400: Injuries and Evaluation of Upper Extremities

This course encompasses common injuries which affect the athletic population and includes orthopedic evaluation, assessment, management and rehabilitation of the upper extremities and the peripheral joints. This course will be a combination of lecture and laboratory format for instruction.

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EXS3300: Physiology of Exercise

This course explores the physiological effects of human physical activity. Topics to be covered include, the neuromuscular, cardio-respiratory, biochemical, and metabolic responses and adaptations to exercise/training.

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EXS3200: Injuries and Evaluation of Lower Extremities

This course encompasses common injuries which affect the athletic population and includes orthopedic evaluation, assessment, management and rehabilitation of the lower extremities and the peripheral joints.  This course will be a combination of lecture and laboratory format for instruction.

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EXS3100: Human Biomechanics

This course introduces students to the concepts of human body mechanics as they apply to human movement. An emphasis is placed upon the mechanics of movement pertaining to exercise, physical activity, and sports. Students will become knowledgeable of the anatomical and mechanical principles which govern human motion and understand how the structure of the body links to function.

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EXS2300

The course will examine the development of gross and fine motor skills over the lifespan in healthy populations. The course will also examine factors that influence the learning of new motor skills (Motor Learning) as a result of practice and/or experience.

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EXS1200

This course explores the various disciplines in the field of Health Sciences. Topics to be covered on each discipline include: history, educational requirements, licensure requirements, employment trends, and salary ranges.  An emphasis is placed upon how the disciplines work together in the professional workforce and in an educational setting.

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EXS1100

This entry level course in Exercise Science provides information on selected topics in the field of exercise science and other related health science disciplines which include: history of exercise science, anatomy, exercise physiology, exercise epidemiology, nutrition, biomechanics, motor control/learning, and sports psychology.  This course is designed to introduce students to the field and to prepare students for advanced courses in the Exercise Science curriculum.

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nur4370

This course provides an overview of nursing informatics and electronic modalities that assist in patient and client management. The automation of data management through information systems, expert systems, and telecommunications will be examined in the context of healthcare informatics. The use of technology to help make decisions and to improve the health status of the individual, family, and community will be emphasized. Legal and ethical implications of informatics and technology in healthcare are addressed.

 

  1. Define the nurse’s role in the use of informatics and technology in the management of healthcare information.
  2. Identify applications of information systems used in the healthcare setting.
  3. Demonstrate effective communication skills in using information technology in the professional healthcare environment.
  4. Explain the effect of regulatory, legal and ethical issues in the use of data and health information systems.
  5. Describe the strategic planning process used in determining the informatics and technological needs of a healthcare organization.
  6. Identify process for use of technology in making healthcare decisions
  7. Describe considerations regarding healthcare technology implementation and maintenance.
  8. Evaluate the effectiveness of a selected technology resource related to the provision of care to a specific population and facility.
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EXS Research Proposal Design

This course aids students in the development of their thesis proposals which leads to a Master of Science Degree in the Exercise Science Department. The full proposal must be completed by the end of the semester.

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EXS Statistics

Apply and interpret the results of various statistical procedures in both descriptive and inferential statistics for different research designs.  Topics to be covered include sampling, hypothesis testing, variability, distributions, estimation, significance testing, as well as students will be able to critically review and analyze statistical procedures in current literature.

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EXS INTERNSHIP

The purpose of the internship requirement in the Master of Exercise Science Program concentration Strength and Conditioning is to offer students the opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge gained from the program and to apply them to a real-world experience. The off-campus experiences may include private practices, colleges/universities, as well as professional sport organizations.  The internship experience gives students the opportunity to enhance their professional behavior via interaction with other professionals and athletes.

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EXS5720: Coaching Aspects of Sport Psychology

This course explores the psychological aspect to sport, exercise, and physical activity. Key psychological theories will be discussed and applied to the athletic population based upon research in the field. An emphasis will be placed upon coaching aspects of sport psychology and application to athletes. Topics will include motivation, stress, communication, group cohesion/dynamics, leadership, reinforcement, and feedback as they relate to sport & exercise.

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EXS5640: Exercise for Special Populations

This course explores how physical activity is associated with diminishing risks for chronic diseases in various populations. The course will explore recommended exercising procedures for exercise testing and prescription for special populations which include: children, adults, women, pregnant women, aging population, among others.

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EXS5120: Strength and Conditioning Applications and Program Design

This course emphasizes concepts from the Strength and Conditioning course (EXS5030). Students will be able to create in-depth fitness programs for various athletic populations in the appropriate settings. An evidence-based approach will be utilized to critically analyze and develop strength and conditioning programs based off of current literature in the field.

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EXS5500: Program Internship (On-Campus)

Students will gain field experience in the Strength and Conditioning Varsity weight room in coordination with the Athletics Department at American International College. Intern(s) will work with the Strength & Conditioning program in direct association with student-athletes. Intern(s) will be expected to work inside the Strength & Conditioning weight room and outside on the Athletics fields as applicable. Other office related responsibilities will be expected as it relates to the internship curriculum and administration of Strength & Conditioning services. Intern(s) will be directly supervised by and report to the Strength & Conditioning Coordinator Faculty member.

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EXS2400: Sport and Exercise Nutrition

This course introduces basic nutritional concepts with application to exercise and athletic performance. An emphasis is placed upon energy expenditure during aerobic and anaerobic exercises, athletic diets, nutritional supplements, and the role of ergogenic aids in performance.

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EXS5290: Bioenergetics in Athletic Performance

This course explores the energy systems of the human body and how they are utilized from a resting to exercise condition. Different modes of exercise will be explored from a biochemistry standpoint. Applications of how to maximize energy system use will be explored in the athletic population.

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EXS5050: Neuromuscular and Hormonal Aspects of Exercise

This course is designed to explore the structural and physiological components of the muscular and endocrine systems. In-depth analyses of how these two systems integrate and coordinate with one another with regards to homeostatic balance will be discussed at rest and during exercise.

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EXS5610: Exercise Testing and Evaluation

This course explores the analysis of preventative and rehabilitative exercise programs, electrocardiography, exercise testing, and exercise prescription.  An emphasis is placed upon the physiological principles which enhance various components to fitness and how to reduce the risk for chronic diseases.

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EXS2100: Research Methods

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of research methodology and terminology.  It includes the identification of relevant research problems, examination of various research methods, and an introduction to statistical procedures/designs.

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EXS5030: Strength and Conditioning

This course will provide students with foundational knowledge of strength and conditioning concepts which will allow students to develop and implement effective strength and conditioning programs to various athletic populations. This class emphasizes proper exercise techniques, proper application of exercises, and safety techniques. Topics which may be covered include the analysis of athletic movement, exercise physiology, muscle physiology, resistance/strength training, aerobic training, speed and agility, plyometric training and other training methods.

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nur6561

Opportunity to further develop leadership, research, teaching, and consultation skills as a basis for advanced clinical practice. Practice issues are explored within the context of ethical and effective use of resources for beginning autonomous practice. Course focuses on the management of complex health issues experienced by clients across the lifespan, with special emphasis on the elderly and other vulnerable populations. Theoretical concepts of organizational systems and health care politics and policy are applied to the advanced practice setting to identify and solve complex health and systems problems.

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nur6551

Focus is on the delivery of care to clients and their families experiencing acute and chronic health problems. Continued emphasis on collaboration with the health care team in the implementation and the evaluation of accepted medical and nursing interventions used in the care of patients across the lifespan. Effective use of skills required for clinical management, education, consultation, referral, and follow-up are emphasized. Therapeutic interventions based upon evidenced-based research are integrated along with complementary and alternative healing approaches appropriate for individuals and their families with health care problems.

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nur6541

First in a series of three clinical management courses for nurse practitioners. Focus of course is on application of advanced pathophysiology concepts and clinical decision making skills to interpret assessment data and develop diagnoses and treatment plans in primary care of clients and their families across the lifespan. The integration of research and evidence-based practice, teaching/health promotion, and consultation skills within the context of collaborative practice are emphasized.

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nur6601

This course is a capstone experience in which the family nurse practitioner students continue to develop knowledge and expertise in the role as a primary care provider. Autonomy in clinical decision-making is emphasized. Family nurse practitioner students increase their levels of responsibility for independent client and family management.

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nur6561

Opportunity to further develop leadership, research, teaching, and consultation skills as a basis for advanced clinical practice. Practice issues are explored within the context of ethical and effective use of resources for beginning autonomous practice. Course focuses on the management of complex health issues experienced by clients across the lifespan, with special emphasis on the elderly and other vulnerable populations. Theoretical concepts of organizational systems and health care politics and policy are applied to the advanced practice setting to identify and solve complex health and systems problems.

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nur6551

Focus is on the delivery of care to clients and their families experiencing acute and chronic health problems. Continued emphasis on collaboration with the health care team in the implementation and the evaluation of accepted medical and nursing interventions used in the care of patients across the lifespan. Effective use of skills required for clinical management, education, consultation, referral, and follow-up are emphasized. Therapeutic interventions based upon evidenced-based research are integrated along with complementary and alternative healing approaches appropriate for individuals and their families with health care problems.

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nur6541

First in a series of three clinical management courses for nurse practitioners. Focus of course is on application of advanced pathophysiology concepts and clinical decision making skills to interpret assessment data and develop diagnoses and treatment plans in primary care of clients and their families across the lifespan. The integration of research and evidence-based practice, teaching/health promotion, and consultation skills within the context of collaborative practice are emphasized.

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nur6150

Clinical practicum practice in nursing education is the focus of this course. Students begin their own reflective nursing education practice with the guidance of a mentor. A practicum project presentation is required.

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nur6250

Clinical practicum practice in nursing administration is the focus of this course. Students are mentored in a nursing administrative practice with an advanced practice nurse. A practicum project presentation is required.

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ptr7170

This is one of five courses in which the student will develop clinical skills. It is intended to serve as an introduction to the profession of physical therapy. The course will cover basic patient handling skills such as, positioning and transferring patients advancing to gait training components, wheelchair assessment and OSHA guidelines. This course is designed to prepare the student to critically analyze a patient and provide interventions to those patients in the acute, sub-acute, rehabilitation and homecare settings.

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otr8900

This capstone course focuses on knowledge synthesis and application and not on instruction. In this capstone course, students synthesize what they have learned throughout the program, reflect on that knowledge, and apply it to a scholarly project. Students will complete their capstone project under the supervision of their capstone committee.

Residency III: Students will have the opportunity to share the outcomes of their capstone projects, lessons learned, and directions for future clinical research and scholarship to advance the profession. A key component of this last residency is the opportunity for students to discuss and reflect on their experiences in the program and new insights and perspectives they have gained, and provide input for program evaluation and improvement.

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otr8800

This course guides the doctoral student through the process of writing for publication. Students will begin with a rough draft they wish to develop into a manuscript to submit for publication. Each student will be assigned to a faculty who will mentor the learner through this process and work within a cluster of faculty and students to develop and review manuscripts.

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otr8500

This course expands students’ knowledge of principles of evidence-based practice and policy, practice guidelines, and information utilization to promote evidence-based practice in clinical practice, education, research, and advocacy.

Residency II: Students will have the opportunity to share their research interests/projects and analyze/critique each other’s ideas/proposals, and reflect on their own learning to date within the context of occupational therapy practice, research, and education.

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otr8300

This course is designed to advance occupational therapists’ knowledge regarding the important role law, ethics, and policy play in determining occupational therapy practice. Students develop/enhance skills to analyze political, legislative, legal, and ethical aspects of practice and broader public health issues.  Examples of issues discussed include, reimbursement, workers’ compensation, the Americans with Disabilities Act, IDEA, privacy & confidentiality, guardianship, malpractice issues, regulatory reform and advanced directives, among others.

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otr8100

This course is a continuation of OT Research I. This course focuses on conducting the actual research planned in Research I and preparing to disseminate findings. Students enhance their knowledge of data analysis methods, both qualitative and quantitative.

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otr7900

Occupational therapy models are examined and applied to address both community-based and population-based issues from a public health and occupation-based perspective, such as prevention and health promotions, aging in place, and others.

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otr7700

Students explore quantitative and qualitative research designs, methodologies, research processes and products, and apply their knowledge to the development of a research proposal. Students explore options for potential research methods and ideas to implement in their own work settings.

Residency I: The purpose of this residency is for students to present, discuss and reflect on the scholarly work developed to date and analyze/critique others’ work and perspectives to continue to develop critical analysis and scholarship skills.

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otr7500

Analysis of occupational therapy theory and its application to and influence on occupational therapy practice, education, and research.

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otr7300

Students examine, develop, and practice leadership in relation to the self, to the profession of occupational therapy, and to the wider contexts of health systems and communities, from the local to the global level.

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otr7100

Students explore learning theories and how theories of human learning and motivation can be applied to the instructional process. Model learning theories associated with behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism are reviewed and applied to creative learning and teaching experiences in the occupational therapy context.

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vda4695

In this course, Visual and Digital Arts Majors spend time working on projects that tailor their portfolios toward career paths that come into sharper focus as they approach graduation. The semester culminates with a gallery exhibition.

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vda4899

This course is a supervised work experience for visual and digital arts students. Students have the opportunity to relate concepts and use skills acquired through coursework to practical applications in a professional setting.

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vda3681

Students will deepen their artistic and creative work by intensive project work. Student explorations will take many forms, whether developing a personal artistic vision, creating projects that benefit the AIC community, or bringing art to the local community.

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vda3601

Across the globe and throughout time, humans have shared a common interest in creating art. By studying the art, past and present, from a variety of cultures, students will develop a multicultural perspective as they answer such questions as: What is the role of art? What is beauty? Why do I value the images that I value? What is the value of art? What is culture? What are my biases? This is a study-and-create class, as students will produce art projects inspired by art from the cultures they study. The course combines research, museum visits and hands-on art creation.

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vda3613

This class builds on and adds to the concepts introduced in Graphic Design 1. Dreamweaver software will be introduced so students can create projects for the Internet. Students will create mock projects for fictional clients to gain understanding how communications materials affect consumers. Students will also create communications pieces that benefit the community surrounding AIC.

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vda2613

In this introductory class, students with learn graphic design production skills. A focus will be on developing proficiency with the industry standard software tools of InDesign, Illustrator and Photoshop. Students will learn the fundamentals of designing communication materials, including: how to effectively convey a message whether with typography, images or symbols. Logo design and branding will be covered. Students will create communications pieces that benefit the AIC community.

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vda2620

Students will be introduced to the history and foundations of animation, both 2D and 3D. Using traditional materials in conjunction with digital technologies, students will create web-ready animation projects.

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vda2860

If you like playing video games or are intrigued by their widespread popularity, this course is for you! The course covers the basics of video game design. Once students learn the fundamental building blocks they will create their own games.

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vda1800

Students will learn the principles and elements of art through various media, such as drawing, painting and sculpture. They will learn techniques and processes to capably and inventively translate ideas into form. Students will also employ the stages of the artistic process to develop creative problem solving skills. A vocabulary for participating in critiques will be introduced. Topics include: color, form, space, line, pattern, rhythm, balance, perspective and abstraction.

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vda2000

For individuals who may spend part of their careers doing freelance work, starting a business or other entrepreneurial ventures, this course lays out the fundamentals of working on your own. Principles of sole proprietorship accounting will be covered, including units on taxes, profit/loss statements, contracts, negotiating and inventory management. Effective traditional and social media marketing practices are covered as well. The importance of networking, both new school and old school, is emphasized, along with no-cost/low cost guerilla marketing techniques.

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vda2210

Students will learn how to communicate multilevel stories of a place, moment, person or time by creating multimedia projects. Working with text, still photography, video, music and audio, students will create digital stories and post them online. Students will combine timeless art principles (including viewpoint, composition, light, angle and setting) with literary fundamentals (such plot diagramming and character development) to create modern video projects.

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vda1600

The course examines the vital role of art in advertising. Students will undertake a multidisciplinary study, approaching the topic through the lenses of history, psychology, art and culture. Combined with studying these general categories, students will create profiles of notable individuals who have put the “art” in advertising.

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thr4899

One of the assets of the theater program is our close relationship with area arts organizations and professional theaters that provide internship opportunities to our students. These internships will be production based and will include work in the following areas: acting, directing, stage management, costume, light, sound and set design, theater administration, and casting. Theater arts majors will be required to take 6 credits of professional learning experience in theater. Students will take this course one as a junior and once as a senior. Students will document their professional learning experience though daily journals and three written self-evaluations. This course can only be taken with the pre-permission of the department chair and approval of the dean of the school of BAS.

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vda1410

The premise of this course is that a creative mindset can be consciously cultivated. Students will immerse themselves in the artistic process, developing tools and techniques necessary to become effective creative problem solvers. Experiential classes will combine hands-on art making with the study of research-based theories. To build art making confidence, the course kicks off with the easy to learn and relaxing ‘Zentangle’ method of drawing. Lab fee charged.

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thr3830

This directed study course is based on the development of Stage Management skills. If a student has interest in working as a stage manager they will be instructed to take this one credit course. Students will learn to develop a stage managers box of tools as well as a stage managers prompt book including any and all information about the production being worked on. Students will learn to develop necessary forms for auditions, actor biography, and production meeting minutes as well as rehearsal report notices. Sections focusing on how to work with challenging actors and crew members will be offered as well as how to work with directors and designers of varied style.

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thr4610

This course is a theory based course and will focus on the relationship theater shares with the society. As theater reflects the world we live in, we must as theater artists take an interest in our communities. We will study the work of Augusto Boal, The Living Theater, The GLBT, Women’s and Black Theater Movements. Students will be assigned readings and will research a theater and society movement. There will be a major final research project assigned that will be presented to the class. The course will culminate with the class volunteering at a local school and will offer ensemble and community building workshops to students. There is an attempt made to bring in a guest theater artists to engage students in discussion of their work as a socially conscious theater artist.

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thr4810

This course is focused on the fundamentals of directing for the theater. This culminating experience should be taken during a student’s senior year. The basic fundamentals of directing will be covered including staging, styles of directing, history of directing, text analysis, scene study, directing theory, working with actors and development of a prompt book. Students will choose one scene to direct for the mid-term exam and a one act play that they must direct as part of a one act play festival that will culminate at the end of each semester in which this course is offered for a final exam. Students will be given examples of each major fundamental and will be given multiple writing and reading assignments. There will also be a series of workshops during class time that will engage students in physical development of stage pictures and will allow them time to rehearse their approach to actors in the formal rehearsal process. Student actors can be used from the Fundamentals of Acting and Styles of Acting courses.

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thr3430

Theater Workshop III is the third of three courses under the theater workshop designation. This course is an advanced course and is meant for students who have taken Theater Workshop I and II. Students can assume roles in the leadership in the production including working as the Set designer, Costume designer, Stage Manager, Publicity Director, Lighting Designer, Make Up designer and upper level acting student. Students will be expected to lead by example for the students working with them making up their crews and apprentice groups. Students in Theater Workshop III must be prepared to take on leadership roles that give them the opportunity to experience the level of work and commitment needed to perform such duties in the real world of the professional theater. Students in this course must also have a focus in terms of their area of study within the course and it must correlate with something they have worked with in the past in the other theater workshop courses.

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thr3610

This course is a history of theater course and will focus on the time periods of 1750 through to the present time. Students will read plays from each era of theater history studied and will research the life and work of each playwright read. There is a string lecture component to this course coupled with a written assignment for each play assigned. There will be an exam for each section of the course material divided by period and will culminate with a major research based project at the end of the course.

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thr3820

This course is based on theatrical research of dramaturgy. If a student has an interest in theatrical research and would like to serve as the dramaturg for a production on campus they will be instructed to take this course in theatrical research. Students will learn the basic approach to theatrical research and why it is integral to ensure a scholarly theater production. The course will focus on the development of the dramaturg’s writing skills and formation of a dramaturgical notebook.

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thr3210

This course is a history of theater course and will focus on the time periods of Ancient Greece through to 1750. Students will read plays from each era of theater history studied and will research the life of work of each playwright read. There is a strong lecture component to this course coupled with a written assignment for each play assigned. There will be an exam for each section of the course material divided by period and will culminate with a major research based project at the end of the course.

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thr3200

This basic voice and articulation course and accompanying lab is designed to help students improve their speaking voice both onstage and in professions such as teaching, management, marketing, public relations, and law just to name a few. In this course, students will gain an understanding of vocal health and the physical demands placed on the vocal apparatus. Content covered will include the Linklater Vocal Warm Up, study of The International Phonetic Alphabet, and basic dialect (accent training). Students will develop the tools needed to recognize and start to deal with their own individual vocal challenges including sustainability, and moving beyond impediments of all kinds.

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thr2620

This course is the fundamental technical theater course in the theater arts curriculum. There is a lecture and lab component to this course and students should be prepared to work hard as both scholars and crew members. During lab time student will learn how to correctly use tools and saws, develop a theatrical flat, paint sets using various techniques, recognize the basic parts of a lighting instrument, rig lighting, gel lighting, design a set and create a set model. Students will be introduced to the basics of set, light, and sound design while learning about the history of technical theater and how spectacle can be used most effectively. Students in play production will use their skills to develop the set, lights, and sound for the theatrical production that semester. In conjunction with students in the theater workshop courses Play Production students will lead the development of spectacle for the play.

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thr2500

This course is the study of scene development and text analysis for the actor. Students read six plays over the course of the semester and chose a scene to work on from each play assigned. Students will engage in conventional and non-conventional scene development and analysis while intensely studying subtext, hidden meanings, and character background. There will be many written and research based assignments related to each character developed. Students will harness a deep understanding of how a scene is conceived of, written and performed with a scholarly knowledge of the text and its origination.

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thr2600

This course focuses on the development of each students understanding of their own body as performers. This course can be taken by actors, dancers, students interested in physically harnessing their center and athletes looking to improve upon their ability to exhibit focused and graceful action on the field. Students will learn how to harness energy and sustainability while engaging in physical theater exercises that focus on the brain body connection. Students will read texts and articles focused on specific movement styles and will engage in physical exploration of these styles furthering their understanding of each styles purpose. Students will develop movement topographies and an understanding of stage combat and will journal about their experiences. An attempt is made to bring in a movement based theater company for workshop training.

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thr2610

In this course, comprised of both lecture and laboratory, students will learn the fundamentals of costume, hair and make up design for the stage. Students will learn techniques for stage make up and wig design, how to design costume sketches, and the techniques necessary to design and build a garment. Students will also learn costume history, the importance of costumes and make up, and how they serve contemporary productions. Students will learn all aspects of caring for and storing costumes, and how to organize the dressing room for productions. Final projects will include make up plots, styling wigs, and building a garment for the department production. Students will also learn how to develop a portfolio of their work.

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thr2430

Theater Workshop II is the second of three courses under the theater workshop designation. This course is an intermediate course and is meant for students who have taken Theater Workshop I. Students can assume a larger role in the production in terms of the hierarchy of theatrical production. Students can work as an actor, technician, asst. stage manager, publicity director, asst. costumer, asst. lighting designer or light board operator, props master, or dramaturg (theatrical researcher). Students will be expected to lead by example for the students involved in Theater Workshop I and will develop work that is reflective of their level of understanding of the subject and their professional title. In addition to other assigned work each student will write a formal evaluation of their work at the end of the semester. Students can take this course for 1, 2, or 3 credits depending on their credit load that semester. Each students work hours in the course will correlate with the credit(s) they are taking. This course can be taken multiple times up to 3 credits.

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thr1430

Theater Workshop I is the first of three courses under the theater workshop designation. This course is an introduction to the play development process. Students can assume the duties of an actor, crew technician, crew costumer and crew props master. Students will be encouraged to work out of their areas of interest to work instead in the areas they know little about. As this section of Theater Workshop is meant for the student who is newly engaging theater each student will be working as an assistant and or supporting player in the process. This course is structured like a crew and company at a professional theater in that hierarchy is of great importance. There will be a lead in each area of study and the students in Theater Workshop I will assist and or apprentice under the more experienced theater students. In addition to other assigned work each student will write a formal evaluation of their work at the end of the semester. Students can take this course for 1, 2, or 3 credits depending on their credit load that semester. Each students work hours in the course will correlate with the credit(s) they are taking. Students can take this course for up to three credits.

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thr2420

This course is the second course in the acting curriculum. The focus of this course will be on the identification and study of the varied styles of acting. We learn in Fundamentals of Acting the importance of focus, center, objective driven action, understanding of text, the relationship between the voice and the body, improvisation, and transformative tools for character development. In this course we will study the varied styles of acting including but not limited to, Kabuki, Commedia, Poetic Realism, Realism, Absurdist etc. We will dive into world theater styles and acting for the theater by watching video of actors training in such areas and engaging in some of the same exercises and assignments they do. We will write about such styles and debate the relevance or lack of relevance and how an actor can adapt to changing styles of performance. One major project will be assigned at the end of the semester and will culminate with the performance of a monologue or scene from one of the plays we have read in class in one of the styles studied in the course. The performance will be accompanied by a written explanation of the student process in developing the performance and a self-evaluation of their work.

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swk4899

The object of the internship program is to give the student practical experience in a social agency, business, organization, or institution. Intern assignments will be made in keeping with the student’s future vocational plans. Course work includes related readings, maintaining a journal, and a final paper summarizing the internship experience. Credits awarded will be determined by instructor and department chair.

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thr1400

This course introduces students to theater as an interdisciplinary, collaborative art. Students will read and analyze plays from varied periods of theater history. The course content includes study of the art, craft, business, and historical roots of drama, as well as theaters relationship to the fine arts. Students will attend the Fall or Spring play and write a formal theatrical critique and whenever possible will attend outside theatrical productions. Over the course of the semester students can expect to engage in a number of group projects including re-writing a scene from a classical play in their own contemporary vernacular and writing a short play using only three words.

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thr1420

This course introduces students to the study and practice of acting for the theater. They will acquaint themselves with physical and vocal warm up activities to harness and understand of the actors body. Students will read plays and will develop one monologue and one scene over the course of the semester from one of the plays read. Students will engage in acting exercises to enhance focus, clarity of thought, a better understanding text, a better understanding of objective driven action and vocal and physical transformation and character development. For each character played students will create a character biography and character journal prior to final performance of scene and monologue. This course also provides a space in which students can harness skills in public speaking, development of confidence and poise, and focus in any given situation.

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swk2401

This course studies the development of modern theory and social work methods in the various fields of social work, including case work, group work, and community organizing.

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swk3201

A primarily experiential and social work course for those seriously considering social work careers. Major topics covered include methods and techniques used in social casework, the interviewing process, role-playing, and casework within the agency setting.

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swk3460

This course will focus on the knowledge, methods and skills of social work practice in the field of child welfare. It will provide an overview of the current children’s welfare system services and practices. Students will explore and analyze the impact of services and practices on the child and family. In addition, students will examine the historical trends in services to children and their families within the framework of supportive, supplemental, and substitute services that have evolved over time as part of the service structure in child welfare. While recognizing the impact of impoverishment, changing family structures, and other aspects of pressures on contemporary family life, attention will be given to social work approaches that encourage parenting strengths and home-based intervention options as preventive strategies in child welfare services.

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srm3401

Examines the application of financial methods and economic analysis to the sport enterprise. Focus on understanding the sport organization as a business model. Techniques of labor economics are applied to the market for sport talent. Uses the tools of finance to assess the economic viability of sport enterprises – ratio analysis, return of investment, capital budgeting, taxation and cash flow, and revenue enhancement through ticket sales, sponsorship, and licensing.

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srm4090

This course deals with topics that are in the forefront of concern for managers in the sports industry. Among the topics covered are: events management, security issues (terrorism and crowd control), selection and compensation of key player, technical, and administrative personnel, community standards and public policy, behavior and conduct of players and spectators. The course makes extensive use of case studies, guest speakers, and field trips to major sporting sites in New England.

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srm3212

This course analyzes the evolving nature of the global sports and recreational business environment with special focus on major events such as the Olympics, World Cup, and Formula One. Integration of markets, regulatory institutions and policies, and cultural factors are examined as driving forces as well as foreign entry strategies and operational decisions in the growth of sports throughout the global economy.

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srm3211

This course analyzes the legal principles and issues involved in the field of sports and recreation management. It explores tort liability, negligence, and product liability, constitutional law, labor laws, personal freedom and individual rights, discrimination issues, due process, and risk management.

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srm3210

Analyzes the application of marketing, promotion, and public relations principles to sport industries. Explores issues in marketing of the sport enterprise, sport-related programs and facilities, products, and services. Focus on marketing sport as a commercial proposition, and on relating sport as a support tool in the marketing of non-sport related products and services. Addresses the unique challenges and new trends in sport marketing.

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srm2850

This course will provide the student with an understanding of the sports communications industry. This course will cover the history and evolution of sports communication,the varying and expanding methodologies of sport communications(covering print,electronic,and online media resources),understanding the importance of advertising and public relations,and the role they play in the media,sociological and legal aspects of sport communication,as well as careers in this sport communication and media industry. This course builds on and enhances skills learned in the introduction to Sports Management course,and serves to compliment topics introduced in other courses such as Sports Law, Sports Economics,and Facility Management. Note: Communication does offer a course in sports writing (COM3410), but it does not capture any of the other areas of sport communication, which are far more significant in today’s sports industry. Additionally, COM3410 does not address any aspects of available careers or the evolution of communications.

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srm3203

Examines psychological theories and research related to sport and exercise behavior. The course is designed to introduce students to the field of sport and exercise psychology by providing a broad overview of the major topics in the area. Students work to increase understanding of how psychological factors influence involvement and performance in sport, exercise, and physical education settings, and to increase understanding of how participation in sport, exercise, and physical education influences the psychological makeup of the individuals involved.

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srm2600

Examines the history of facility management and modern issues facing facility managers. The focus is on the application of management skills as applied to arena, stadium, and event management. The course examines the requisite skills to run a facility, including understandings on management theory, facility operations, marketing, budgeting, and legal considerations.

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srm2800

This course studies the effectiveness of programs and explores how programs are developed to achieve positive social change. The human service areas of application would include criminal justice, sports and recreation management, psychology, and sociology.

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srm2801

Examines the principles and foundations of the sporting goods industry. The focus is on the history, the current structure, and the current challenges facing the industry. The students also gain an understanding of the role of vendors in the industry as well as learning about the channels of distribution, an understanding of how products are marketed in the sporting goods industry, the financial dimensions of the sporting goods industry, and an appreciation for the growth of e-commerce in the sporting goods industry.

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spa2211

The course will examine more complex grammatical/structural aspects of Spanish with expanded opportunities for listening, speaking, reading, and writing practice. SPA1202 or permission of instructor.

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srm1600

Examines the principles and foundations of sports management and how the concepts of planning, organizing, leading and controlling apply to the sport enterprise. The focus is on the application of core management principles, including ethics, to provide a basis for understanding the development and oversight of sport organizations, and for addressing current management issues facing this industry.

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spa1201

This is a basic course for students who have had little or no experience with the Spanish language. The course includes drill in pronunciation, elementary conversation, grammar, and writing, and the use of a cultural approach text. This is a comprehensive language course teaching the four skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

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spa1100

This course provides students with a basic knowledge of the terms and expressions used in the field of health care.

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spa1010

This course examines distinguishing features of contemporary Latin American culture. It will provide students as understanding of modern daily life, including topics such as fashion, popular music, television, etc. Emphasis will be given to social and business etiquette, especially for students who wish to prepare themselves to engage in intercultural or international transactions.

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soc4894

Selected topics, chosen in accordance with the student’s interests and background, are analyzed in depth.

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soc4899

The object of the internship program is to give the student practical experience in a social agency, business, organization, or institution. Intern assignments will be made in keeping with the student’s future vocational plans. Course work includes related readings, maintaining a journal, and a final paper summarizing the internship experience. Credits awarded will be determined by instructor and department chair.

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soc3630

This course presents a sociological analysis of the status of women after the Women’s Liberation movement. Special emphasis on roles, work, family, education, and goals women have set for themselves, not only in the United States but in other societies as well.

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soc3430

This course examines the impact of religion in American life; the changing religious landscape; profiles of America’s religious groups; trends in individual religious commitment; and the relationship between religion and politics in the U. S.

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soc3440

Societal expectations and reactions to health and illness in the United States will be examined. Institutions and current provider systems will be described. Discussion will center around the concept of the sick role and the reciprocal statuses (medical and allied health professions) involved. Alternative health options will also be discussed.

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soc2800

The student will study the outstanding theorists in the development of sociological thought. Special attention will be given to the works of Durkheim, Marx, and Weber. Upper division students.

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soc3243

This course is an intensive study of selected ethnic and racial groups and subcultures in their structural and cultural aspects. Students will study how these affect their lifestyles in relation to dominant groups within the social system. Both classical and contemporary models of minority-dominant relations will be considered for their relevance toward an adequate understanding of contemporary social systems.

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soc2631

A study is made of methods used in sociological research with special emphasis on measurement and data collection. Time will also be devoted to the interview, questionnaire, and recent sociological studies.

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soc2643

This course examines the development and functioning of bureaucratic organizations, including both formal and informal aspects. The sociology of work will also be discussed with emphasis on occupations and professions and their performance expectations within the organization.

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soc2650

The course will cover the social systems of former colonial nations in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean. Emphasis will be placed on their changing institutions: political, economic, educational and social, as influenced by colonialism.

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soc2430

An examination is made of the family as a major social institution, and how family forms and roles vary across cultures. Topics include: ethnic and social variations in structure, single-parent families, parent-child interactions, non-traditional marriages, and domestic violence.

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soc2600

This course is an in-depth exploration of the causes and consequences of social class inequality in the United States. Emphasis will be placed on an analysis of the multiple ways in which social and economic inequality operates to provide power and privilege to certain segments of society. The effect of social class inequality on racial and gender inequality is also considered.

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soc2621

Social aspects of aging over the life span will be discussed. Age-related changes, role transitions, and outcomes of increased longevity will be presented. Special topics include: race, ethnicity, retirement, access to healthcare, long-term care, as well as death and dying.

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soc2400

The extent and types of crime and delinquency in contemporary society, and the criminologist’s contribution to the analysis of causal factors are examined and discussed.

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soc2410

This course introduces the sociological perspectives of deviant behavior, including social control theory, social disorganization theory, anomie theory, labeling theory, and conflict theory. Scientific research on such deviant behaviors as prostitution, pornography, and drug use will be examined. Governmental deviance, corporate deviance, and police deviance and the cost of these forms of deviance to society are explored.

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soc2420

This course focuses on the creation and maintenance of social institutions and the ways in which these congeries of organizations and structures shape human relations and experience. Particular emphasis will be placed on the educational system, government, the family, religion, the economy, and the media.

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soc1400

This course examines what makes a social problem and an analysis of present areas of tension and social maladjustment, especially those associated with recent rapid social changes.

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soc1610

This course explores the operation and structure of complex organizations and bureaucracies. Particular emphasis is placed on corporations, government agencies, and educational institutions.

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soc1100

This course is designed to acquaint the student with working knowledge of the concepts used by sociologists and with the well-established generalizations in the field. Topics include socialization, primary groups, stratification, population, and bureaucracy. This course is a prerequisite for all other sociology courses.

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slp3099

This practicum allows the student to apply concepts and theories learned in previous classes via observation of assessment and therapy sessions in a variety of educational and clinical settings. Where permissible and practical, students will have the ability to participate in supervised speech, language and hearing interventions.

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soc1010

This course presents the fundamentals of anthropology. Both physical and cultural anthropological perspectives will be utilized. A holistic focus will be on the intersection of these two perspectives as they attempt to explain human social behavior. Main topics related to the role and results of natural selection include: territoriality, food acquisition, aggression, gender roles, marriage, reproduction, religion, socialization strategies, and child rearing.

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slp3050

This course presents an introduction to clinical issues in providing services to persons with communication impairments. Case management, documentation, assessment, and therapy principles as well as professional responsibilities and ethics are addressed.

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slp3010

Study of the implications of a broad range of speech and language disorders on learning and academic performance, which will include language processes that are related to literacy acquisition. Assessment and service delivery models in the educational setting will also be addressed.

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slp1050

This course provides an introduction to culture and awareness of the diversity among cultures within our own society. Definitions of race, culture, and ethnicity are discussed as well as the various cultures found within the United States. The history of immigration and the impact on the United States will be explored. In addition, communication and basic language development between English and non-English speaking cultures will be addressed.

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slp2010

This course focuses on the acquisition of speech and language in children and the continued development of language over the life span and will include the biological basis of language, models of language development, and the structure of language systems.

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ptr7736

Clinical Education III is the culminating clinical education experience. The assignment will be 40 hours/week for a 12 week period. The student will demonstrate entry level skills and knowledge necessary to enter into the professional practice of physical therapy upon completion of this course.

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slp1010

This course provides an introduction to the field of communication sciences and disorders including language, speech, and hearing. Normal development and basic anatomy relevant to each of these areas will be discussed along with an overview of disorders of speech, language and hearing. Additional topics related to scope and practice of the profession, assessment overview, therapy overview, augmentative/alternative communication, sign language, etc. will be discussed.

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ptr7730

Scientific Inquiry V is the culminating course in the scientific inquiry sequence. Students participate in faculty supervised independent study with the goal of completion and dissemination of a capstone project in the form of a clinical case report. Students identify, research and document a clinical case that has not already been reported in scientific literature. Students submit a manuscript, create a poster, prepare and present a platform presentation and disseminate their capstone projects with the college and local community.

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ptr7660

This course requires integration of material previously learned in Gross Anatomy, Kinesiology, and the Patient Management and Clinical Medicine series. The focus of this course is on advanced examination and intervention skills for the patient with spinal and TMJ musculoskeletal impairments, with an emphasis on evidence-based practice. Interventions will include muscle energy techniques, mobilization, manipulation as well as therapeutic exercise and patient education. Teaching methods for this course will include lecture, discussion, lab experience, on-site ergonomic analysis, patient demonstrations, case studies, student presentations, and online lectures and discussions.

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ptr7641

The Complex Patient seminar integrates both clinical and basic science knowledge and skills acquired throughout the curriculum by analyzing patients with multiple diagnoses and movement dysfunction. Students will have the opportunity to apply clinical decision-making skills to the dynamic interaction of multiple system variables (physiological, biomechanical, psychological, social, cultural and environmental) and their impact on the disease and recovery process. Tests, measures and interventions will be discussed related to the diagnostic categories described in the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. The format of this course will include a variety of learning experiences including presentations by expert clinicians, small group discussions, patient based experiences, video demonstrations and written assignments.

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ptr7650

This course integrates knowledge from core curriculum courses as it relates to normal development and pediatric disorders. The course will examine the clinical decision making process involved in pediatrics with regards to musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiopulmonary and neonatal impairments. The student will be knowledgeable in the tests, measures, and examination, evaluation, and intervention strategies as described in the Guide to Physical Therapy Practice. The student will explore evidence-based medicine for further investigation of the efficacy of physical therapy outcome measures in pediatrics. The student will recognize and internalize the psychosocial impact on children and families with disabilities. A variety of learning experiences will be provided to develop critical thinking skills.

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ptr7633

This course focuses on leadership theory and principles, organizational processes, policy formation, political aspects of the Affordable Healthcare Act, and various components of private practice. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared to incorporate the values of transformational leadership into their personal leadership plan, understand the progression of starting their own practice, and navigate the contemporary healthcare environment. A current research-based approach will be used to explore leadership, healthcare innovation, and political influences in order to create models that may expand the profession of physical therapy.

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ptr7630

Scientific Inquiry IV is one of the culminating courses in the scientific inquiry sequence. Students participate in faculty supervised independent study with the ultimate goal of completion of a capstone project in the form of a clinical case report. Students will identify and research a clinical case that has not already been reported in scientific literature. Student will submit the first draft of their manuscript in order to progress to Scientific Inquiry V.

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ptr7631

The course will explore the principles of differential diagnosis in which the student will develop a systematic method of distinguishing between disorders of similar character by comparing their signs and symptoms. A case-based approach will be used in this course. Principles of imaging, including radiography, CT scans, MRI, special studies and arthrograhy will also be discussed. The course prepares students for their final clinical education experience.

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ptr7541

This course investigates the components of health promotion and wellness programs presented with an emphasis on prevention and the promotion of health and wellness. Concepts and constructs of health and wellness in relation to individuals and populations will be reviewed and analyzed. Promotion of health, health of Americans (Healthy People 2020) and world health (World Health Organization, WHO) are discussed. Students examine and apply theories and models relevant to changing health behavior.

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ptr7542

This course focuses on management of the patient with cardiopulmonary dysfunction or disease with an emphasis on patient examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis and evidence based interventions. Students will examine the normal function of the cardiopulmonary system across the life span as the basis for pathogenesis and the application of physical therapy management.

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ptr7535

This course is the fourth in a series of clinical medicine courses and provides an overview of pathological conditions affecting the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Emphasis is placed on pathology, etiology, clinical signs and symptoms as well as implications for patient management. This information will establish a foundation for examination and treatment of patients with cardiopulmonary dysfunction. The student integrates this knowledge with Cardiopulmonary Patient Management, which is taught concurrently.

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ptr7536

Clinical Education II is the second in a series of three clinical education experiences in which the student will have the opportunity to perform examinations and interventions in the adult population, across the practice patterns. The assignment will be 40 hours/week for a 12 week period, beginning at the end of the second academic year.

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ptr7540

This course examines the relationship of the psychosocial aspects of illness and disability. Students will discuss topics regarding ageism, cultural diversity, gender issues, death and dying, elder and child abuse, and domestic violence.

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ptr7525

This course will examine the principles of teaching and learning across the lifespan. Students will discuss issues regarding teaching peers, patients, caregivers and the community. Learning theory and styles and the interactive use of technology will be emphasized.

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ptr7531

This course reviews pharmacology and its relevance to physical therapy practice. Basic mechanisms of drug action are described. Drug benefits and detrimental side effects are presented related to specific disorders. Selected medications and their impact on patient management are discussed. This course is taught concurrently with Neuromuscular and Cardiopulmonary Patient Management and relevant sections are interactively supportive.

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ptr7533

This course is an advanced integumentary patient management course in which students study patient/client management concepts pertaining to disorders of the integumentary system across the lifespan. It is a culminating integumentary course following introduction to wound care in Foundations of Clinical Medicine. Major topics include evidenced based physical therapy management of integumentary dysfunction associated with burns, traumatic injury, infection, vascular disease, lymphedema, and pressure/mechanical wounds.

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ptr7520

This course examines the theoretical and clinical basis for the treatment of patients with neurological impairments. Evidence for historical and current intervention approaches will be discussed. Students will design, implement, progress a plan of care and analyze functional outcomes. The format of this course will be lecture/laboratory style, including patient demonstrations, movement analysis and exploration of handling skills.

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ptr7460

This course introduces the student to the components of normal and pathological gait across the lifespan. The normal mechanics of gait are the basis for the biomechanical assessment of the foot and ankle and patient management for orthotic and prosthetic prescription and training.

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ptr7532

This course introduces students to ergonomic principles and processes, governing bodies, and the application of ergonomics in the home and work setting. Selected topics will include job site analysis; work capacity evaluations and intervention planning. Students will conduct a job/home sites analysis and formulate an intervention plan.

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ptr7433

This course is the third in a series of three clinical medicine courses and provides an overview of pathological conditions affecting the central and peripheral neuromuscular systems. Emphasis is placed on pathology etiology, clinical signs and symptoms as well as implications for patient management. This information will establish a foundation for management of patients with neuromuscular dysfunction. The student integrates this knowledge with physical therapy patient examination in Neuromuscular Patient Management I and patient intervention planning in Neuromuscular Patient Management II.

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ptr7450

This course examines the theoretical and clinical basis for the examination and treatment of patients with neurological impairments. Historical and current theories of CNS function, motor control, motor learning and motor development will be used as the framework for this process. Examination procedures and findings, and their implications for therapeutic interventions will be explored based on the ICF and the Nagi Model of Disablement and evidence based practice. The format of this course will be lecture/laboratory style, including patient demonstrations, movement analysis, and examination procedures.

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ptr7336

Clinical Education I is the first in the series of three clinical education experiences in which the student will have the opportunity to perform examinations and interventions in a clinical setting. The assignment will be 40 hours/week for a 12 week period, beginning at the end of the first academic year. The experience is designed to permit progressive responsibility in patient examination and treatment.

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ptr7430

Neuroscience I and II will introduce the students to the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the central nervous system. Emphasis will be placed on the sensory and motor functions of the human nervous system. The application of basic neuroscience to clinical practice will be included. Current research topics and methodology will be discussed to foster an ongoing ability to integrate new information.

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ptr7431

This research course will critically explore the issues involved in conducting and evaluating research in physical therapy. Concepts from Scientific Inquiry I will be reinforced while examining the nature, relevance, and application of qualitative and quantitative research methods as they relate to assessment and intervention outcomes in the context of evidence-based practice. Students will learn the concepts, theories, and tools necessary to formulate a research question. Emphasis will be placed on the strengths and weaknesses of different types of research design, validity and reliability of outcome measures, types and effects of research biases, and review of clinical research literature.

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ptr7237

This course is designed to provide the physical therapy student with knowledge of human pathology of selected body systems including implications for patient management. Topics covered are inflammation, wound healing, immune responses, basic oncology, infectious diseases, liver diseases and specific diseases of the endocrine, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems. This is a foundational course as it promotes an understanding of disease processes, and it guides the student in application and analysis of medical pathology in patient care. The course will also introduce students to professionalism in physical therapy including the Code of Ethics, Guide to Professional Conduct, Professional Behaviors, Standards of Practice, Core Values and the APTA’s Vision 2020 Statement. Contemporary practice issues and patient rights will be discussed. Teaching methods will include lecture, readings and discussions. This course prepares the student for their first clinical education experience, PTR7336.

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ptr7241

Facility with the application of statistical methods used in physical therapy and rehabilitation research is essential to implementing Evidence Based Practice (EBP) and improving patient care. Students will learn to analyze and interpret descriptive and inferential statistics. Emphasis will be placed on evaluation of diagnostic tests, the reliability of patient assessment, assessment of meaningful clinical change, identification of intervention responses, and use of clinical prediction models. Readings, class discussion, in-class exercises, and exams will focus on applying statistical analyses to specific aspects of patient care.

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ptr7242

This course investigates the principles of exercise physiology, including physiologic function, muscle architecture, and biological responses to various forms of exercise. Lecture sessions will focus on the basic principles and expected responses to exercise. Selected topics will include aerobic and anaerobic metabolism, muscle structure and physiological responses to exercise.

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ptr7230

Neuroscience I and II will introduce the students to the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the central nervous system. Emphasis will be placed on the sensory and motor functions of the human nervous system. The application of basic neuroscience to clinical practice will be included. Current research topics and methodology will be discussed to foster an ongoing ability to integrate new information.

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ptr7232

This is the second in a series of three clinical medicine courses designed to acquaint the student with medical aspects and pathologies of diseases and disabilities. The first orthopedic unit follows Patient Evaluation I: PTR 435, for basic orthopedic clinical terminology, runs concurrently with Musculoskeletal Patient Management II: PTR 446. Also included are special units on the management of hand problems and maternal adaptations to pregnancy.

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ptr7220

This course focuses on treatment intervention techniques such as therapeutic exercise, massage, extremity mobilization, and spinal traction, and prepares the student for the design, implementation and evaluation of treatment programs. This course is designed to prepare students to perform patient interventions specifically in the outpatient setting, but can also be adapted to the acute care, sub acute, rehabilitation and home care setting. This course is integrated with Musculoskeletal I, Gross Anatomy II, Musculoskeletal Clinical Medicine and Kinesiology.

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ptr7210

This course continues the series on management of the patient with musculoskeletal dysfunction, with an emphasis on patient examination, evaluation, diagnosis and prognosis. The course emphasizes a Cyriax-based examination scheme and also includes basic McKenzie principles for diagnosis of spinal disorders, gait and postural analysis.

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ptr7160

This is one of two fundamental patient management courses in which the student will begin to acquire clinical skills. It is intended to serve as an introduction to the profession of physical therapy. The course will cover basic clinical techniques such as bandaging, positioning and transferring patients, gait training, wheel chair assessment, application of various heat and cold modalities, hydrotherapy, paraffin, ultrasound and nerve and muscle stimulating currents. This course is designed to prepare the student to critically analyze a patient and provide interventions to those patients in the acute, sub acute, rehabilitation and homecare settings.

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ptr7150

This course provides a foundation for examination and diagnostic skills relevant to orthopedic, neurological, cardiopulmonary and integumentary pathologies. This course introduces the student to the Nagi model of disablement, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and to the five elements of patient/client management as described in the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. Primary areas of emphasis in this course are examination procedures including history taking, systems review, and basic tests and measures such as assessment of vital signs, reflexes, joint range of motion and strength. In addition, the student will also learn documentation using a SOAP note format.

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ptr7145

This course introduces the student to basic concepts of biomechanics as applied to human functional anatomy and motion. Primary areas of study will include kinematics, kinetics, muscle function and anthropometry. This course prepares the student for further study of movement dysfunction across the curriculum.

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ptr7133

This course is the first in a series of clinical medicine courses designed to provide the physical therapy student with knowledge of human pathology of selected body systems including implications for patient management. Topics covered are inflammation, wound healing, immune responses, basic oncology, infectious diseases, liver diseases and specific diseases of the endocrine, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems. This is a foundational course as it promotes an understanding of disease processes, and it guides the student in application and analysis of medical pathology in patient care. It is taught concurrently with Fundamentals of Patient Management I and II. Teaching methods will include lecture, readings and discussions. This course prepares the student for their first clinical education experience, PTR7336.

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ptr7142

This course will introduce students to professionalism in physical therapy including the Code of Ethics, Guide to Professional Conduct, Professional Behaviors, Standards of Practice, Core Values and the APTA’s Vision 2020 Statement. Contemporary practice issues and patient rights will be discussed.

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ptr7131

Evidenced Based Medicine is the process of finding, appraising and using research findings in order to make sound patient management decisions. This course introduces the learner to the basic concepts of EBM and is the first in the Scientific Inquiry series. Students will learn how to formulate relevant clinical questions, search and critically appraise the medical literature, and implement useful findings into clinical practice. Students will also be introduced to the research requirements and process for the doctor of physical therapy degree at AIC. Teaching methods will include web-based instruction, case studies, small group discussions and lecture.

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ptr7120

This course is an extension of Human Gross Anatomy I. The course will continue its in-depth examination of the musculoskeletal system of the human body. The materials will be presented in lecture format, supplemented with laboratory experience with human cadaver dissection, computer programs, audiovisual tapes and anatomical models. Topics covered include the lower extremity, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, head and neck.

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ptr7030

This course focuses on the fundamentals of English and the manner in which healthcare professionals communicate with scientific and public audiences. Students will be prepared to write documents such as abstracts, research proposals and summaries of scientific literature using AMA style. Students will be exposed to different types of research materials through the use of library and electronic resources.

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ptr7020

This course is designed to present an in-depth examination of the musculoskeletal system of the human body, with limited consideration of pertinent aspects of other body systems. The course material will be presented in lecture format and supplemented with laboratory experience with human cadaver dissection, computer programs, audiovisual tapes and anatomical models. Topics covered include the spine, neck, thorax and upper extremity.

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ptr3201

Physical Therapy Orientation is designed to educate the student about the history of physical therapy, financing and reimbursement in healthcare, the importance of effective communication and the role of the physical therapist, physical therapist assistant, occupational therapist, speech language pathologist and nurse in healthcare. Students will also be introduced to medical terminology and medical abbreviations to prepare the undergraduate student for the professional phase of the physical therapy program.

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psy9989

Limited to candidates for the Doctor of Educational Psychology degree who have successfully completed the comprehensive examination.

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psy9210

Introduction to the gross and microscopic anatomy of the central nervous system and to the physiology of the nerve impulse and synaptic transmission. The course reviews the relationship of behavior to the nervous system on such chemical factors as hormones and neural transmitters. A term project is assigned for which the student prepares a paper, lecture, videotape, audio tape, or any combination of these dealing with the physiological correlates of any behavior.

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psy9220

The focus in this course is on the practical problems involved in real-world research. Topics covered include the nature of causal inference, validity of instruments and design, experimental and quasi-experimental field-based research approaches, design development, and problems involved in the statistical analysis of data obtained from complex design.

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psy9118

This course is designed to allow doctoral students the opportunity to explore a single topic in greater detail than might be possible in other courses. This course is only open to doctoral students with advanced standing, who, because of past experience, can demonstrate competence in up to two non-comprehensive exam courses. Under such circumstances, these courses would be waived, and the directed study used in their place. Lab fee is at the discretion of the instructor.

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psy8790

This course covers cognitive neuroscience, attention and consciousness, perception, memory, knowledge, representation, language, problem solving and creativity, decision making and reasoning, cognitive development, and intelligence. Students will research theories, models, and scientists from many disciplines, including physics, chemistry, biology, and neuroscience, which contribute to the study of cognition and cognitive science. The course will present from a premise that cognitive psychology, the science of the human mind and of how people process information, is at the core of empirical investigations into the nature of mind and thought, and that cognitive psychology is at heart empirical philosophy. Students will research, assimilate, and understand core questions about thought, language, perception, memory, and knowledge.

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psy8798

This course permits the student, in conjunction with his or her core faculty advisors, to create a mentored-study experience that allows for in-depth study of topic of interest related to the student’s doctoral research. The student must create a complete syllabus outlining the learning experience and receive core faculty approval prior to beginning the course.

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psy8780

This course offers advanced studies of theoretical approaches to and key concepts of brain based learning and their practical applications to applied psychology and education. It integrates cross-disciplinary research in the neurosciences, cognitive psychology, neuropsychology, and education to provide learners with solid empirical foundations of current theories and models of brain based earning principles.

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psy8785

This course focuses on the gross anatomy of the nervous system and the basic relationships between the brain, chemical neurotransmitters and behavior; right and left hemisphere specialization; learning disorders and learning style differences; relationships between neurotransmitters and psychiatric disorders; biological bases of memory systems and retrieval processes including long-term, short-term, episodic and semantic memory.

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psy8765

Course Description: This course incorporates the traditional evidenced based applications and goals of a psychology of well-being (getting rid of negatives and dealing with ordinary challenges), as well focusing on current methods in Positive Psychology that emphasize growth and excellence. Positive Psychology is the study of how human beings prosper and overcome adversity. Its goal is to identify and enhance human strengths and virtues and allow individuals and communities to thrive.

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psy8770

This course examines basic psychological processes that influence health and illness including perceived control, stress, behavioral conditioning, factors that influence behavioral change, self-efficacy and social support. It examines specific behaviors, illnesses, and physical conditions that are part of the behavioral medicine domain, including: obesity, smoking, cancer, HIV, and hypertension. This course also considers learners holistic approaches to stress management, looking at both cognitive skills and relaxation techniques.

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psy8775

This course is designed to prepare learners to provide guidance and support to clients whose treatment currently includes or might include pharmacotherapy. The purposes, advantages and limitations of specific medications and how to evaluate the usefulness of various medications in conjunction with other treatment approaches will be covered, to include latest information on the effects of psychotropic medications on various groups including children, the elderly, women and different racial and ethnic populations.

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psy8750

This course focuses on the history, theory and practice of family therapy, with analysis and comparison of beliefs, therapeutic strategies, and techniques of the most prominent approaches. It includes the study of differences between individual and systems approaches to helping families and the use of the genogram in family therapy, as well as the role and functions of a family therapist.

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psy8755

This course includes advanced studies of theoretical approaches to and key concepts of group counseling and their practical applications. It focuses on the elements of group dynamics and process; group counseling methods; strategies and skills; historical and cultural contexts in which models were developed; leadership styles and practicalities of creating and leading groups.

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psy8760

This course focuses on understanding the psychological processes underlying humans’ development of eating behaviors and the adoption of both healthy and maladaptive cognitions and behaviors concerning food, eating, and our bodies. Issues to be addressed include: food choice, the development of food preferences, motivation to eat, cultural influences on eating patterns, weight-regulation, body image, dieting behaviors, obesity, eating disorders, and treatment of unhealthy and clinical eating problems. The psychology (not physiological processes) of eating will be emphasized, and psychological problems associated with eating will be thoroughly discussed. Areas of examination include anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, compulsive eating, obesity, and weight preoccupation; discussion of cultural and nutritional factors, family issues, and psychological consequences, as well as preventative and therapeutic interventions. Nutritional needs & food choices for optimal health of individuals across the lifespan and Interrelationship with wellness are also explored.

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psy8745

This course includes exploration of the theories, dynamics and processes of personality; the nature and causes of the personality proposed by major personality theorists; various modes of practice derived from psychoanalytic/psychodynamic, psychophysiological, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, and existential theoretical paradigms; and the symptomologies of major psychiatric disorders; and use of the DSM-IV-TR in practice.

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psy8735

This course focuses on theories and applications of child and adolescent development. Special emphasis is placed on understanding childhood and adolescent developmental processes from holistic perspectives integrating established theories of biological, cognitive, emotional/psychological, moral, and psycho-social development.

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psy8740

This course focuses on developing one’s understanding of child, adolescent, and adult emotional development, especially within the context of established psychological and related developmental theories and models. Special emphasis is placed on understanding emotional development and processes from holistic perspectives integrating established theories of biological, cognitive, emotional/psychological, moral, and psycho-social development.

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psy8725

This course focuses on the delicate role of supervising beginning practitioners with an emphasis on supporting the new therapist in a developmental move into a full professional identity.

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psy8730

This course focuses on issues and theories of adult development, especially within the context of established psychological and related developmental theories and models. Course content is designed to support professional work with adults through understanding of theories of adult development, life course issues and cultural and biological issues in aging.

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psy8720

This course focuses on strategies for helping supervisees identify their own coherent counseling philosophy, personal strengths and weaknesses, and their abiding sense of meaning in the work they do. The course includes strategies for the supervisor in eliciting deep conversation with supervisees and in inspiring supervisees towards their own best practices.

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psy8710

This course draws from the theories and themes of positive psychology as an approach to supervision. Considerations of supervisor feedback based in principles of thriving, positivity, and wholeness will be included.

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psy8715

This course focuses on the specific skills needed to supervise family therapists and people working with couples and family groups. The unique role of the family therapist and considerations of how this translates to supervision will be included.

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psy8705

This course includes focus on a variety of challenging issues in supervision, including verbal and nonverbal resistance by supervisees, issues of transference, breaches of ethics, cultural difference and supervision anxiety. Included is the study of ways to counteract resistance, support supervisee openness and turn the process of challenging experiences into a positive growth experience for supervisees and supervisor.

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psy8690

This course will focus on the ethics and professional orientation for the counseling supervisor, including a focus on dual relationships, legal issues, complex situations in supervision, and a moral and ethical base for the work of supervision.

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psy8695

The course focuses on methods and theories of group supervision, with an emphasis on how the group process facilitates learning of supervisees, as well as building the field of inquiry and knowledge acquisition.

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psy8700

This course focuses on being aware of and respecting the spiritual orientation, as well as personal and professional values of the clinician being supervised. Included are considerations of different value/spiritual traditions and an inquiry into the nature of how values affect the counseling relationship.

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psy8680

This course focuses on the need of counselors to understand the wide range of religious and spiritual experiences of clients and how these impact mental health and well-being. Included is a study of clients’ sense of meaning and purpose in life, as well as their values and beliefs. Consideration is given to the utilization of the client’s belief system in furthering counseling goals. The course introduces, as well, transpersonal psychology theory and practice as a framework for professional counseling.

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psy8685

This course includes studies of historical and societal aspects of drug use and abuse. It covers core concepts of substance use, abuse and dependence and the etiology of drug abuse. The neurophysiology of addiction and effectiveness of treatment methods and preventive strategies for addictions are covered.

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psy8670

This course includes studies of the principles and theories of learning and behavior including functionalist, associative and cognitive approaches; and current research and practical applications of learning theories in clinical, educational and other applied settings.

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psy8675

This course includes a focus on psychopharmacology for the counselor. Attention to the ways in which drugs interact with the brain to affect cognitive processes and behavioral states is noted. Study of the specific classes of drugs and their applications to the treatment of psychological disorders including psychosis, anxiety, depression, and bipolar disorders is included.

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psy8665

This course includes an exploration of the theories, concepts and practice of positive psychology including applications in clinical, coaching, and other settings; promoting psychological health in ones life and practice; the study of positive emotion and life satisfaction; intervention/coaching strategies that address specific life challenges for counselors and their clients.

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psy8650

This course focuses on the history, theory and practice of family therapy, with analysis and comparison of beliefs, therapeutic strategies, and techniques of the most prominent approaches. It includes the study of differences between individual and systems approaches to helping families and the use of the genogram in family therapy, as well as the role and functions of a family therapist.

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psy8655

This course includes studies of the diverse nature and constructs of human sexuality, sexual identity and sexual dysfunction. Perspectives of human sexuality including biological, behavioral, cultural, social, psychological, as well as clinical factors will be studied. The role of the professional counselor and counseling strategies are considered.

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psy8660

This course includes exploration of the theories, dynamics and processes of personality; the nature and causes of the personality proposed by major personality theorists; various modes of practice derived from psychoanalytic/psychodynamic, psychophysiological, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, and existential theoretical paradigms; and the symptomologies of major psychiatric disorders.

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psy8518

Supervised experience in psychotherapeutic and assessment procedures in an approved clinical facility. Includes seminars and case conferences and must be supervised by a licensed clinical psychologist. The internship may be selected after the student has completed 60 credit hours of doctoral work and involves 16 to 20 hours a week. On-campus meetings are also required as a key part of the supervision. Additional requirements may apply.

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psy8635

This course focuses on psychopathology and includes studies of the etiology and categorization of psychopathology; historical, sociopolitical, cultural, behavioral and epidemiological approaches to the systematic description of psychological disorders; use of the DSM-IV-TR in differential diagnosis; potential alternatives to the existing system; and the roles of assessment, treatment planning and intervention for psychological disorders.

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psy8645

This course includes studies of the gross anatomy of the nervous system and the basic relationships between the brain, chemical neurotransmitters and behavior; right and left hemisphere specialization; learning disorders and learning style differences; relationships between neurotransmitters and psychiatric disorders; biological bases of memory systems and retrieval processes including long-term, short-term, episodic and semantic memory.

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psy8508

Supervised experience in psychotherapeutic and assessment procedures in an approved clinical facility. Includes seminars and case conferences and must be supervised by a licensed clinical psychologist. The internship may be selected after the student has completed 60 credit hours of doctoral work and involves 16 to 20 hours a week. On campus meetings are also required as a key part of the supervision. Additional requirements may apply.

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psy8418

These courses will serve to meet requirements for licensure for counselors seeking state licensure and NBCC certification. They will include a practicum course and up to two internships based on the licensing and certification requirements. All aspects of psychological practice – appraisal, therapeutic intervention, and consultation – are addressed in the internship experience. Both a site-based and a college supervisor closely monitor the activity of the learner throughout the internship process to ensure that all internship activities are appropriate to this field of psychology. The college and field (site-based) supervisors formally evaluate the progress of individual learners.

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psy8420

This course focuses on developing an appropriate research design for each student’s dissertation proposal. It includes articulating the research questions, choosing the design and being able to articulate its appropriateness to the inquiry at hand, discussing the assets and limitations of the design, human subjects and other ethical concerns, and proposed methods of data collection and analysis.

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psy8410

This course will provide students with an intensive analysis of cognitive functioning. Different paradigms of information processing, especially those that are developmentally related, will be reviewed with emphasis on cognitive development and assessment.

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psy8228

The purpose of the practicum is to provide experience for the student in a school and/or clinical setting. The student is offered an opportunity to apply skills gained from course work in actual practice of psychology. The student works under the direct supervision of a certified or licensed psychologist with the assistance of a college adviser. The adviser helps the student to develop appropriate goals, to effectively use interpersonal skills, and to determine the areas to be further developed. Periodic group meetings are held with the college supervisor in order to provide additional academic information and to discuss practical experiences.

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psy8340

This course emphasizes cultural diversity, especially regarding persons of color. The focus is on the impact of cultural diversity on psychological health and growth. The students will be involved in becoming familiar with the challenges and opportunities presented by a diverse culture. Although the emphasis will be on persons of color, coverage will also include diversity in other areas, such as gender, socioeconomic class, and cultural background.

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psy8209

The theory and practice of Appreciative Inquiry, an approach to organizational change that emphasizes identifying and building on the good things that already exist in the system. The emerging field of Positive Organizational Scholarship is studied as well.

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psy8218

The purpose of the practicum is to provide experience for the student in a clinical setting. The student is offered an opportunity to apply skills gained from course work to clinical practice. The student works under the direct supervision of a certified or licensed psychologist with the assistance of a college supervisor. The student is encouraged to develop goals, interpersonal skills, and to determine any individual framework. Periodic campus meetings are held with the college supervisor.

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psy8208

This course provides field-based experience that allows students to apply theoretical knowledge to professional and scholarly objectives, and arrange supervision, where necessary. Faculty approval is required before the internship can commence.

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psy8024

This course examines the creation and execution of power relationships, political engagements and communications in institutions and organizations. Leadership styles and strategies for effectively navigating the political landscape with organizations will be explored. Students will have the opportunity to identify, analyze and critique their own social styles and leadership skills as part of their studies.

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psy8031

This course includes studies of career development theory and research and the application of these in a counseling. Theoretical and operational foundations of career counseling, career decision-making, and career development, including assessment and intervention, as well as various career decision-making processes, are included. The relationship between career development and a range of life factors is considered. Practical skills for helping individuals consider career choice and lifestyle options are included.

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psy8020

This course includes advanced studies of theoretical approaches to and key concepts of group counseling and their practical applications. It focuses on the elements of group dynamics and process; group counseling methods; strategies and skills; historical and cultural contexts in which models were developed; leadership styles and practicalities of creating and leading groups.

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psy8012

This course focuses on strategic issues and choices in acquiring, developing, motivating, managing and retaining a workforce, from the perspective of a general manager, or non-HR manager. Topics include employment law, job design and analysis, performance management, HR planning, staffing, training and development, compensation and incentive and employee/labor relations.

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psy8016

This course focuses on the study of theory and practice of appraisal, including issues of reliability and validity; evaluation procedures and test administration, as well as clinical and practical aspects of individual and educational testing and clinical diagnosis; integration and interpretation of data from a variety of appraisal procedures; report writing; and the professional communication of appraisal results. It includes legal, ethical and social/cultural issues related to the appropriate use of major instruments for evaluating intelligence, aptitude, achievement, personality and neurological conditions; and computer-managed and computer-assisted methods.

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psy8005

This course will allow the student to focus on the specifics of supervision within varying theoretical orientations and populations. Noting the theory under consideration directs the learner towards understanding how supervision fits within that theory and methodology.

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psy8006

This course focuses on the study of theory and practice of appraisal, including issues of reliability and validity; evaluation procedures and test administration, as well as clinical and practical aspects of individual and educational testing and clinical diagnosis; integration and interpretation of data from a variety of appraisal procedures; report writing; and the professional communication of appraisal results. It includes legal, ethical and social/cultural issues related to the appropriate use of major instruments for evaluating intelligence, aptitude, achievement, personality and neurological conditions; and computer-managed and computer-assisted methods.

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psy8009

This course explores two vibrant and emerging fields: Positive Psychology and Positive Organizational Scholarship (POS). One basic premise of positive psychology is that human flourishing- a life rich in purpose, relationships, and enjoyment -will not result simply by curing pathology but requires building and capitalizing on human strengths and capacities. Topics of study include happiness, positive emotions, resilience, creativity, finding meaning, and optimism. POS investigates collective and emergent processes of optimal functioning, at the levels of individuals in organizations, groups in organizations, and organizations as a whole. POS is premised on the belief that enabling human flourishing in organizations involves unlocking or building potential resources, capabilities and capacities in people, groups and systems. The focus on generative dynamics leads researchers to consider the role of positive emotions, positive meaning, and positive relationships, among other mechanisms as keys to explaining human and collective flourishing.

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psy7510

This course focuses on an introduction to the selection and construction of a research design and choice of appropriate research methods for the student’s inquiry to be undertaken. A variety of research methods will be reviewed. The design and collection of data, data analysis, and ethical issues related to research with human subjects will be explored.

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psy7520

This course focuses on developing understanding of adult learning and the implications for professional practice. Regardless of role and formal job description, all institutional leaders must interact with adults, and an understanding of the developmental tasks of personal and career cycles is essential. Knowing how to motivate individuals, support them through times of change, and encourage risks that lead to positive transformation will be studied. Course content is designed to stimulate thinking about how to promote growth and transformation in one’s own life and with others.

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psy8001

This course includes the study of ethical issues in a variety of counseling settings and includes the moral and legal bases for ethical codes and guidelines for human service professionals. The counseling relationship and ethical and professional conduct, standards, and practices are considered. Issues related to client/counselor conflict and societal, legal and cultural values are included. The course will include a focus on methods and strategies for recognizing and resolving ethical dilemmas.

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psy7465

This course includes studies of major theories, approaches and procedures in counseling and psychotherapy, their historical-cultural developmental contexts, and their applications and practice. Students will be exposed to an overview of current and emerging approaches to psychological counseling, including psychodynamic, existentialhumanistic, transpersonal, cognitive-behavioral, and systems approaches. Emphasis is on both theory and practical applications of the various approaches.

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psy7435

This course explores scholarly literature and research related to leading organizations through change and sustaining renewal efforts. Application of theories related to leading organizations, organizational change, creative leadership, renewal, and sustaining change will be emphasized.

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psy7440

This course includes advanced studies of a range of research methods and program evaluation. Topics include: basic descriptive and inferential statistical analyses, needs assessment, ethical and legal considerations in research and evaluation, research design and implementation, and the purpose, fundamentals and process of program evaluation. Both qualitative and quantitative methods are considered.

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psy7422

This course explores scholarly literature and research in the field of organizational behavior, focusing on key factors affecting successful communication, both between individuals and within the institution. This course helps students analyze styles and modes of communication in one-to-one, group, and large-system settings. It offers an opportunity to deepen one’s own understanding of his/her own communication style and skills, including verbal, non-verbal, perceptual, and cross-cultural theory and research

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psy7425

This course focuses on the study of theory and practice of appraisal, including issues of reliability and validity; evaluation procedures and test administration, as well as clinical and practical aspects of individual and educational testing and clinical diagnosis; integration and interpretation of data from a variety of appraisal procedures; report writing; and the professional communication of appraisal results. It includes legal, ethical and social/cultural issues related to the appropriate use of major instruments for evaluating intelligence, aptitude, achievement, personality and neurological conditions; and computer-managed and computer-assisted methods.

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psy7430

This course includes studies of career development theory and research and the application of these in a counseling. Theoretical and operational foundations of career counseling, career decision-making, and career development, including assessment and intervention, as well as various career decision-making processes, are included. The relationship between career development and a range of life factors is considered. Practical skills for helping individuals consider career choice and lifestyle options are included.

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psy7410

This course includes advanced studies of theoretical approaches to and key concepts of group counseling and their practical applications. It focuses on the elements of group dynamics and process; group counseling methods; strategies and skills; historical and cultural contexts in which models were developed; leadership styles and practicalities of creating and leading groups.

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psy7415

This course focuses on psychopathology and includes studies of the etiology and categorization of psychopathology; historical, sociopolitical, cultural, behavioral and epidemiological approaches to the systematic description of psychological disorders; use of the DSM-IV-TR in differential diagnosis; potential alternatives to the existing system; and the roles of assessment, treatment planning and intervention for psychological disorders.

View Course »

psy7420

This course focuses on the study of theory and practice of appraisal, including issues of reliability and validity; evaluation procedures and test administration, as well as clinical and practical aspects of individual and educational testing and clinical diagnosis; integration and interpretation of data from a variety of appraisal procedures; report writing; and the professional communication of appraisal results. It includes legal, ethical and social/cultural issues related to the appropriate use of major instruments for evaluating intelligence, aptitude, achievement, personality and neurological conditions; and computer-managed and computer-assisted methods.

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psy7330

This course focuses on micro-level topics related to individual and interpersonal processes within an organization, including how individual behaviors, cognitions and perceptions are affected by organizational context, structure, culture, and values. Study of the critical skills needed by managers to support their ability to lead and work effectively in teams as well as to know when teams are not the best way to reach organizational goals is included. In spite of ongoing reliance on teams, many organizations do not create conditions to develop and support high performing teams. This course is designed to develop and hone the team management and membership skills of students. In particular, it focuses on helping students understand how to avoid or manage typical team “traps” that lead to ineffectiveness.

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psy7350

This course explores the topic of ethics in the professional domain. Students will be exposed to theories of ethical practice on both the individual and institutional levels. There will be opportunities to consider ethical dilemmas that one may face as a practitioner, as well as chances to reflect on one’s own ethical code and values.

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psy7320

This course includes the study of ethical issues in a variety of counseling settings and includes the moral and legal bases for ethical codes and guidelines for human service professionals. The counseling relationship and ethical and professional conduct, standards, and practices are considered. Issues related to client/counselor conflict and societal, legal and cultural values are included. The course will include a focus on methods and strategies for recognizing and resolving ethical dilemmas.

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psy7325

This course focuses on developing an understanding of the effects of organizational and managerial practices on individual self-fulfillment and systems effectiveness. Foundational theories of organizational development will be covered, as will theories of organizational change. Students will be introduced to action-research methods in organizational development.

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psy7326

This course includes studies of the principles and theories of learning and behavior including functionalist, associative and cognitive approaches; and current research and practical applications of learning theories in clinical, educational and other applied settings.

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psy7315

This course includes advanced and comprehensive studies focused on the major models and theories of psychology, with a specific focus on the historical western philosophers and philosophies and subsequent theorists and theories that provide the foundations of the established models of modern psychological schools of thought and paradigms.

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psy7240

This course focuses on critical elements of sustaining individual and institutional health and wellness, as well as promoting optimal performance among individuals. Students will examine literature on the importance of building and maintaining collegial relationships, participating in reflective practice in action, and developing workplace activities that promote learning, sharing, and collaborating among individuals.

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psy7241

This course is designed to provide students with theoretical and practical knowledge of clinical supervision models, methods and issues. The course will explore supervisory roles, evaluation methods, research, and socio-cultural issues in supervision.

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psy7210

This course focuses on current theories of human development across the lifespan. Consideration of the influence of genetic and environmental factors will be included, as well as an advanced overview of the physical, cognitive, behavioral, and emotional elements of development. The change process and strategies for facilitating appropriate development will be addressed.

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psy7220

This course focuses on personal and professional awareness and sensitivity to issues of diversity and the impact of culture. Advanced studies will include models of cultural competency in all arenas of diversity, including race, ethnicity, gender, class, ability and more. The course will cover knowledge of pertinent concepts and issues, and acquisition of skills applicable to multicultural situations. The course is also designed to look at issues of oppression in our society and the impact of that oppression.

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psy7230

This course focuses on identifying factors that promote individual and institutional resiliency, especially in times of transition and change. Major theories and research on resiliency at both levels will be covered. Students will have the opportunity to build personal theories of best practice about how to build and nurture resiliency in themselves, their co-workers, and those they supervise.

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psy6899

This course provides a culminating experience that allows each student to reflect on his or her scholarly and professional growth over the program of study. In organizing the portfolio according to program competencies and values, the student provides evidence of his/her meeting those outcomes, as well as concentration-specific and individual goals laid out in the Degree Plan.

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psy6855

This course focuses on developing an understanding of the nature and function of group assessments. This includes, but is not limited to, such areas as achievement, aptitude, interest, and vocation. The nature and purpose of tests such as the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System as a requirement for high school graduation is also explored. Students will understand the issues of assessment norms, validity, and reliability, as well as general principles of test construction. Emphasis will be on the ability to interpret and integrate information obtained from assessment tools for the purpose of addressing student needs, and on communicating assessment results to students, parents, and teachers.

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psy6889

This course is primarily an off-campus supervised work experience in a forensic setting involving approximately 15 hours per week for an academic semester. All externships are usually undertaken during the final year of the program with approval of the program director. One hour of direct on-site supervision is required and will optimally be provided by a licensed/certified mental health professional. On-campus meetings are also required and are an integral part of the supervision process. All forensic experiences, broadly defined, will be considered as acceptable placements.

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psy6840

This course will focus on the relationship between nutrition, diet, and food and their role in emotional health and wellness. This course will provide students with practical information, critical thinking skills, and the scientific foundation needed to help clients make better informed choices about their diet and health.

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psy6845

The purpose of this course is to continue to have school counselors develop the psychological, behavioral, and therapeutic skills in order to provide basic counseling services to students in elementary, middle, and high school. Emphasis will be on the practical strategies to help students with problems such as depression and anxiety that are consistent in most student issues such as academic underachievement, peer relationship problems, cultural differences, emotional disorders, and the issues of homosexual and bisexual youth.

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psy6850

The purpose of this course is to learn to carry out a psychoeducational assessment using appropriate assessment instruments and to write an effective report of the assessment. To achieve this, the class will become familiar with the particulars of testing and test administration, and will critique and study formal and informal tests and testing procedures in the areas of reading, math, language, attention deficit, and behavior. The influence and impact of standardized tests on groups such as racial, ethnic, cultural minorities, and English language learners will be explored. This course will deal with the techniques of synthesizing and integrating psychological and practical information into an effective report and educational plan. Emphasis will be placed on assessment techniques, an overview of presenting problems, the development of appropriate intervention strategies, the presentation of psychological reports, and consultation and collaboration with both parents and professionals.

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psy6830

This course will focus on the study and application of theory and techniques to assist the counselor in the appropriate integration of spirituality into the counseling process. The course will promote the knowledge and skills that counselors should possess to effectively engage clients in the exploration of their spiritual and religious lives as they relate to other psychological concerns.

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psy6820

This course will focus on the cognition of health, which addresses how thinking and reasoning are related to health behavior and illness. The course reviews how various cognitive processes such as risk perception, cost/benefit analysis, judgmental heuristics, norm perceptions, cognitive dissonance, and control perceptions are related to the adoption of healthy and unhealthy behaviors and the processing of health information. The course will also cover the concurrent influence of motivational and affective influences such as defensiveness. Attention will be devoted to how people make health-related decisions (such as whether to screen for cancer), how they respond to health communications, and how they mentally represent illness (as well as the extent to which cognitions determine the course and recovery from illness). This course takes a general theoretical approach.

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psy6829

The purpose of the clinical experience is to provide a culminating experience for the student under the direct mentorship of a licensed school adjustment counselor or licensed guidance counselor with assistance from a college supervisor. The student is provided an opportunity to develop and to apply skills gained from course work to actual practice as a school counselor. The advisor and mentor help the student to develop appropriate goals, to effectively use interpersonal skills, counseling skills, consultation skills, and to determine areas to be further developed. The student is expected to take significant responsibility in developing independence in the application of skills and must demonstrate competence by meeting performance goals. At least one-half of the clinical experience must be completed in a school setting. Since the student must qualify for an initial license before beginning the clinical experience, this experience may be done on the job and is necessary for the professional license.

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psy6810

This course is designed to enable advanced students in the complementary health counseling specialization with the opportunity to consolidate their overall understanding of the field. The course focuses on large systems issues including ethical, legal, and professional concerns; economic, political, organizational, and policy issues, and research methods in Complementary Health Counseling.

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psy6819

The purpose of the clinical experience is to provide a culminating experience for the student under the direct mentorship of a licensed school adjustment counselor or licensed guidance counselor with assistance from a college supervisor. The student is provided an opportunity to develop and to apply skills gained from course work to actual practice as a school counselor. The advisor and mentor help the student to develop appropriate goals, to effectively use interpersonal skills, counseling skills, and consultation skills, and to determine areas to be further developed. The student is expected to take significant responsibility in developing independence in the application of skills, and must demonstrate competence by meeting performance goals. At least one-half of the clinical experience must be completed in a school setting. Since the student must qualify for an initial license before beginning the clinical experience, this experience may be done on the job and is necessary for the professional license.

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psy6809

This course is primarily an off-campus, supervised work experience, extending from September to May and involving 16-20 hours per week. Practica are undertaken in the final year of the program, with approval of the clinical faculty. On-campus weekly meetings are required and are an integral part of the necessary supervision. All aspects of clinical experience from intake to discharge are acceptable with primary emphasis on face-to-face counseling interaction. May be repeated for up to nine credits.

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psy6689

All prior coursework in program, passage of Communication and Lieracy, MTELs, GPA of 3.0 and approval of school district and AIC’s Office of Field Experience.

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psy6710

This course will examine how the theoretical foundations of complementary health counseling are applied in clinical practice. This seminar will begin with a survey of the assessment strategies of the complementary health counselor including bio-psychosocial approaches, interview, observational, and behavioral methods and paper and pencil measures. Students will then proceed to a survey of individual, group, family and large systems interventions, an examination of medical adherence, and conclude with a discussion of supervisory and consultation issues in the field.

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psy6678

The purpose of the practicum is to provide a culminating experience for the student in a school and/or clinical setting. The student is offered an opportunity to apply skills gained from course work in actual practice of school adjustment counseling. The student works under the direct supervision of a certified or licensed school adjustment counselor with the assistance of a college advisor. The advisor helps the student to develop appropriate goals, to effectively use interpersonal skills, and to determine the areas to be further developed. A weekly seminar class is considered to be component of the practicum in order to provide additional academic information and to discuss practical experiences. The practicum is 900 clock hours (six credits). At this point, the student is employable as a school adjustment counselor, and works independently with mentorship and college supervision.

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psy6684

In this course, a student pursues, in-depth, an individualized program of reading and/or research with a specific faculty member.

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psy6688

The purpose of the practicum is to provide a culminating experience for the student in the School Guidance program in a school. The student is offered an opportunity to apply skills gained from course work in actual practice of guidance counseling. The student works under the direct supervision of a licensed guidance counselor with the assistance of a college advisor. The advisor helps the student to develop appropriate goals, to effectively use interpersonal skills, and to determine the areas to be further developed. Periodic meetings are scheduled with students and the college advisor as part of the practicum experience. The duration of the practicum is 450 clock hours, for which three credits are awarded. The clinical experience is a continuation of the practicum and builds upon the experience. At this point, the student is employable as a guidance counselor and works independently with school mentorship and college supervision. The clinical experience is 600 clock hours, for which six credits are awarded.

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psy6615

This course covers a number of advanced topics in the general area of social psychology, including cultural, ethnic, and group processes, sex roles, organizational behavior, group dynamics, status and role, attribution theory, and leadership. Special emphasis will also be placed on cultural diversity, including those issues related to racial and ethnic bases of behavior, with a focus on people of color.

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psy6649

This is an opportunity for students to apply the principles learned in their coursework to the practical application in the area of school counseling in order to improve student service. This is an action-based research project completed as part of a graduate degree. For those students who have decided not to pursue licensure, this research project may be completed in place of the advanced praticum.

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psy6610

This course explores the theory base of complementary health counseling. The seminar begins with a stress and health exploration of the biological bases of health and disease and includes an overview of psycho-neuroimmunology stress and health. The course examines the contributions of learning theory and cognitive behavioral models, learned helplessness and self-efficacy, stress and coping with an emphasis on social bases of health and disease, Engel’s bio-psychosocial hierarchy, family systems, health and disease, and concludes with ethno-cultural variables and health and existential and meaning making models.

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psy6588

In these courses, a student pursues, in-depth, an individualized program of reading and/or research with supervision by first and second core faculty.

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psy6598

In these courses, a student pursues, in-depth, an individualized program of reading and/or research with supervision by first and second core faculty.

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psy6605

This course will provide students with techniques to integrate the theories of treatment into specific situations that the counselor or psychologist will confront in actual practice. Topics will range from working with clients in multiple system membership to consultation around behavioral/emotional issues in schools as well as clinics. The consultation model will be considered as it relates to counselors and psychologists within a multicultural model.

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psy6515

This course covers the fundamental principles of pharmacology, drug actions, tolerance, addiction, clinical use of psychotic medications, substance abuse, and addiction treatment. Research that explores the efficacy of medications taken during treatment, specific treatment programs, and the degree of recidivism is presented.

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psy6578

In these courses, a student pursues, in-depth, an individualized program of reading and/or research with supervision by first and second core faculty.

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psy6510

Includes studies of the theories and principles of crisis intervention as applied to therapeutic strategies for treatment; scientific bases of various approaches to crisis intervention including short-term, long-term and telephone counseling methods; community and societal crisis; interventions with diverse clinical populations; professional skills for intervening, prevention techniques; evaluation of services; and the roles and responsibilities of others participating in crisis intervention.

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psy6330

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the field of learning disabilities and acquaint students with the various concepts of learning disability and the changing and developing perspectives during the past 20 years. Included will be a review and evaluation of the evidence for the existence of a social learning disability and nonverbal learning disabilities. The evidence for a neurological basis of learning disabilities is explored. Definitions and terms are introduced and discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the concept that a learning disability is not a single entity that will respond to a single remedial strategy, but exists rather as a multi-dimensional phenomenon basically occurring in the context of school-related tasks.

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psy6410

Includes studies of historical and societal aspects of drug use and abuse; core concepts of sub-stance use, abuse and dependence; the etiology of drug abuse; neurophysiology of addiction; ef-fects of licit and illicit drugs; and effectiveness of treatment methods and preventive strategies for addictions to food, sex, alcohol, drugs, work, gambling and relationships.

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psy6505

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the major issues in the practice of psychology. The course will involve an intense analysis of the philosophical, technical, and consultative issues contributing to the professional identity and function of the psychologist in a public school or clinical setting. Emphasis will be placed on the setting, the practical application of theory, and the demands placed on the setting, the practical application of theory, and the demands placed on the practicing school psychologist. This course stresses professional ethics and general standards of conduct. The guide for this section of the course is the American Psychological Associations Code of Ethics.

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psy6230

Exceptional children are those for whom special educational programming is considered necessary. In this course, we consider the characteristics, prevalence, etiology, neurological correlates (if applicable), developmental course, assessment, and treatment for the categories of learning disabilities (including reading disability and nonverbal LD), ADHD, Aspergers syndrome, children with limited English proficiency, children from culturally diverse backgrounds, and the gifted and talented.

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psy6310

Includes studies of psychopharmacology including ways in which drugs interact with the brain to affect cognitive processes and behavioral states, the fundamental principles of psychopharmacology including pharmacokinetics and chemical neurotransmission; specific classes of drugs and their applications to the treatment of psychological disorders including anxiety, depression, bipolar mood and psychotic disorders; and substance use and abuse through topics including basic neurophysiology, addiction processes and the effects of licit and illicit drugs.

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psy6220

This course focuses on the history, theory and practice of family therapy, with analysis and comparison of beliefs, therapeutic strategies, and techniques of the most prominent approaches. It includes the study of differences between individual and systems approaches to helping families and the use of the genogram in family therapy, as well as the role and functions of a family therapist. In this course, learners will research and explore specific issues in family dysfunction, including cultural and social phenomena, addictions and abuse, alternative family structures. Learners will also explore current treatment issues in working with diverse family structures, and subsequently better understand the role of marital, couple, and family counselors/therapists in various practice settings and in relation to other helping professionals. The course will also cover ethical and legal considerations specifically related to family and systems related work.

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psy6225

Basic behavioral measures and techniques involved in working with special needs children, including theory, assessment, materials, and problem remediation. Special attention is given to communication, observation, and group management skills.

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psy6210

This course includes exploration of the theories, dynamics and processes of personality; the nature and causes of the personality proposed by major personality theorists; various modes of practice derived from psychoanalytic/psychodynamic, psychophysiological, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, and existential theoretical paradigms; and the symptomologies of major psychiatric disorders; and use of the DSM-IV-TR in practice. In this course, learners will articulate the major psychological theories of personality and the characteristics of an individual which provide the foundation of the personality, and will research the theories of etiology and development of personality characteristics. Learners will also explore psychologically healthy and deviant personality functioning within varied social and cultural contexts and ways in which stable characteristics are modified.

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psy5838

Is the second required semester of internship experience in counseling psychology. Learners are required to accumulate a minimum of 300 supervised internship hours to complete this requirement, bringing the total internship hours to 600 to complete the program. (See additional requirements for individual state regulations)

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psy5938

Is third semester of internship experience in counseling psychology, which some students may need to complete their state licensure requirements. Learners are required to accumulate a minimum of 300 supervised internship hours to complete this requirement, bringing the total internship hours to 900 to complete the program. (See additional requirements for individual state regulations) (In some states, Students may need to take third internship)

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psy6110

Includes studies of the gross anatomy of the nervous system and the basic relationships between the brain, chemical neurotransmitters and behavior; right and left hemisphere specialization; learning disorders and learning style differences; relationships between neurotransmitters and psychiatric disorders; biological bases of memory systems and retrieval processes including long-term, short-term, episodic and semantic memory.

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psy5720

Optional as determined by state regulations. A pre-internship practice in application of counseling psychology principles and skills. Learners must accumulate a minimum of 100 hours of practicum experience at a faculty-approved site. Includes practice of basic and intermediate individual and group counseling skills with clients to integrate theoretical knowledge from coursework with practical applications. A site-based clinical supervisor and a faculty advisor closely monitor activity of the learner throughout the process to ensure that all practicum activities are appropriate to the field of study. The faculty advisor and field (site-based) supervisor formally evaluate the progress of individual learners. Learners submit a practicum log and reflective essay to chronicle their growth and development, and must receive satisfactory field evaluations.

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psy5738

The first of two semesters of supervised internship in counseling psychology designed to integrate theoretical understanding with direct, hands-on exposure to practice. Fieldwork experience serves to provide practice of counseling psychology skills in an applied setting under the supervision of an experienced practitioner. Learners must accumulate a minimum of 300 hours of Internship I (to meet the minimum requirement for the Program’s 600 hour total internship hours*) at a site approved by the faculty in order to complete this requirement. All aspects of psychological practice – appraisal, therapeutic intervention, and consultation -are addressed in the internship experience. Both a site-based supervisor and faculty advisor monitor the activity of the learner throughout the internship process to ensure that all internship activities are appropriate to this field of psychology. The advisor and field (site-based) supervisor formally evaluate the progress of individual learners.

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psy5710

This course examines the process of ethical decision making in the workplace and the role of the ethical leader. Theories of ethical decision making, principles, and theoretical concepts will be covered. Students also will be encouraged to reflect upon their own ethical code and decision making. Emphasis in this course is on the real life application of theoretical concepts.

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psy5620

Focuses on psychopathology and includes studies of the etiology and categorization of psychopathology; historical, sociopolitical, cultural, behavioral and epidemiological approaches to the systematic description of psychological disorders; use of the DSM-IV-TR in differential diagnosis; potential alternatives to the existing system; and the roles of assessment, treatment planning and intervention for psychological disorders. Learners will identify and articulate the ethical issues related to the diagnosis and treatment of abnormal behavior and mental illness, and will demonstrate knowledge of the major diagnostic categories including current theories related to the development of the disorders and commonly used treatment strategies. Learners will also explore the various emotional disorders and reactions to stress such as anxiety disorders, somatoform and dissociative disorders, affective disorders, and the schizophrenias and related psychotic disorders. Course materials will also facilitate the various disorders related to social mal-development such as personality disorders and sociopathy, substance abuse disorders, eating disorders, and sexual and gender identity disorders.

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psy5630

This course includes studies of the diverse nature and constructs of human sexuality, sexual identity and sexual dysfunction. Perspectives of human sexuality including biological, behavioral, cultural, social, psychological, as well as clinical factors will be studied. The role of the professional counselor and counseling strategies are considered.

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psy5640

This course examines a range of research methods, basic descriptive and inferential statistical analysis, needs assessment, ethical and legal considerations in research, steps of research design and implementation, and the fundamentals of program evaluation through use of qualitative and quantitative methods.

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psy5610

Includes introductory studies of the basic concepts of testing and other assessment techniques including norm-referenced and criterion-referenced assessment, environmental assessment, performance assessment, individual and group test and inventory methods, behavioral observations, alternative assessment, and computer-managed and computer-assisted methods.

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psy5550

Group Work and Therapy: This course includes advanced studies of theoretical approaches to and key concepts of group counseling and their practical applications. It focuses on the elements of group dynamics and process; group counseling methods; strategies and skills; historical and cultural contexts in which models were developed; leadership styles and practicalities of creating and leading groups. Learners will research ethical and professional issues in group therapy practice, and analyze various uses of group counseling or supervisory techniques. The role of an effective group leader and group leadership styles, group dynamics, and social and cultural factors in groups will also be considered.

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psy5560

Includes studies of career development theory and research; applications in counseling and educational settings; approaches to career decision-making processes; relationships between career development and life factors; career development exploration techniques; skills for helping individuals consider career choice and lifestyle options; and sources of occupational and educational information.

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psy5530

Includes studies of social psychology; group dynamics and processes; organizational behavior; attribution theory; socially inherited and transmitted patterns of pressure, expectations, and limitations learned by individuals; unique characteristics of individuals, couples, families, ethnic groups and communities; issues and trends in a multicultural society (including culture, ethnicity, nationality, age, gender, sexual orientation, mental characteristics, physical characteristics, education, family values, religious values, spiritual values, and socioeconomic status); and awareness of discriminatory attitudes and beliefs that can have a negative impact on group and individual relationships in various contexts.

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psy5540

Includes studies of the basic building block and advanced counseling skills; the collaborative nature of the helper-client relationship; consultation skills; nonverbal and reflecting skills; and the three stage helping model that drives the client’s problem-managing and opportunity-developing action: helping clients tell their stories, helping clients determine what they need and want, and helping clients develop strategies to accomplish their goals.

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psy5520

Includes studies of current theories of human lifespan development as influenced by genetic, biological and environmental factors; physical, cognitive, intellectual, language, behavioral learning, emotional, and personality aspects of development; the nature and needs of individuals at all developmental levels.

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psy5418

A continuation of PSY5338. In this course, the student will be encouraged to develop a personal frame of reference around personality assessment. Specifics include an examination of several traditional and non-traditional diagnostic instruments such as the TAT and Rorschach. Problems involved in assessing dysfunction will be included, as well as the application of assessment and diagnoses to the selection of treatment modalities.

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psy5430

This course will familiarize students with the particulars of forensic assessment and test administration and will deal with techniques of synthesizing and integrating psychological and practical information into an effective forensic report. Emphasis will be placed on formal and informal assessment techniques, presenting problems, presentation of reports, and collaboration with other professionals. Students will develop skills in the assessment and diagnosis of disorders commonly found in forensic settings.

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psy5408

This course provides students with a yearlong opportunity (100 hours) to put their acquired academic knowledge of psychology and counseling into clinical practice prior to their final years internship, when they actually work with clients. This course is normally undertaken in the second year of the program and after PSY5215. The practicum is utilized, in part, to meet the requirements for certification as a mental health counselor. In addition to developing counseling skills through the readings and exercises in the textbook, students also role-play counseling in the classroom and on audio and videotapes. Students explore their specific career interests and search for sites for the following year’s internship experiences.

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psy5415

This course addresses the physical, cognitive, and social-emotional development of children, adolescents, adults, and the elderly, including a description of behaviors that are present at the various stages, and explanations for those behaviors in terms of relative contributions of heredity and environment. The sociocultural and social economic factors that may contribute to a development outcome are considered.

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psy5355

This course traces the history of the major theoretical positions in psychology (structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, gestalt, and psychoanalysis) from their epistemological, both rationalistic and empirical, and philosophical roots, dating from ancient Greece to the present time. Coverage will include discussions of the scientific method and the philosophy of science. Finally, contemporary positions, especially those involved in the cognitive revolution, will be covered from both the psychological and physiological points of view. Throughout these latter discussions, emphasis will be placed on the developmental aspects of human growth.

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psy5338

Provides a thorough understanding of the administration, scoring, and interpretation of both the WISC and WAIS. Subject analysis stresses an understanding of cognitive strengths and weaknesses. Scoring analysis covers comprehensive personality descriptions. Differential diagnosis is also integrated in the course from a treatment-planning perspective. A major emphasis will be placed on the proper administration, scoring, interpretation, and preparation of a written report based on the Wechsler Scales. In addition, direct and indirect assessment techniques will be covered.

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psy5345

This course examines disorders in adulthood, adolescence, and childhood with consideration of the relationship between biological, social, psychological, and environmental factors, as well as problems in classification and potential behavior systems. The concepts of normal and abnormal will be explored especially when attempting to understand the behaviors of culturally diverse groups. The symptomatological disorders, including borderline personalities, and various phobic and obsessive-compulsive syndromes will be studied. Also covered will be dis-compensation, stress, anxiety, and defense.

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psy5350

This course is a study of adolescent behavior, including current theories concerning the nature of adolescence. Emphasis is placed on physical, emotional, and cognitive forces, and how they interact to shape the adolescent personality. Students write a topical paper on some aspect of adolescence to gain a better understanding of the issues.

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psy5318

This course involves doing original research in the area of criminal psychology. Students will be involved in gathering data, statistically analyzing the data, and writing the results of the research project. Students in this course will work as a research team investigating the correlates, theories, personality characteristics, and possible explanations of criminal behavior.

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psy5322

This course is designed to give the students general knowledge of the typical course of development in children and adolescents in the major areas: physical, cognitive, and social-emotional. The ages from 3 to 21 will be the focus of the information provided in this course since teachers, school counselors, and school psychologists work within this age group primarily. The relative contribution of heredity and environment are considered when describing and explaining behavior. Specific focus is on the impact of early childhood education, poverty, abuse, and technology on development as well as on the education process. Cultural, English language learning and socioeconomic factors are also addressed within the context of contemporary times.

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psy5325

Intensive coverage of the major learning theories in psychology, and their epistemological roots in philosophy, both from the point of view of rationalism and empiricism. Emphasis, however, will be on the twentieth century and will include Pavlov, Thorndike, Watson, Guthrie, Hull and Skinner as behaviorist-associationists, and Wertheimer, Kohler, Lewin, and Bruner on the cognitive gestalt side. Bandura’s social modeling theory will be stressed, including discussions of racial prejudice and attitude change. Piagets cognitive model will be stressed, including discussion of qualitative differences in learning according to developmental stage. Coverage will also include processing models, cognitive acquisition theories, and the basic models concerning the physiology of learning and memory.

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psy5315

The emphasis in this course will be on human growth and the counseling process within the group setting. Among the concepts included are curative factors, interpersonal learning, group composition, and tasks and techniques for change. Drug addictions, poverty, and education will be explored in understanding the individual response to group counseling. The class itself will experience these concepts by both participating in a personal growth group and reviewing appropriate literature.

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psy5316

This course will provide students with information about the various forensic activities in which psychologists and other related professionals currently participate. Activities may include competency evaluations, assessment of violent behavior and dangerousness, child abuse/neglect, treatment issues, court testimony, police psychology, and consultation to judges, attorneys, and other law enforcement personnel. Students will obtain information about the numerous roles of professionals in the field of forensic psychology and will develop the skills and knowledge base that will prepare them to continue with specialized training in this area.

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psy5305

This course is designed to acquaint the student with vocational counseling practices. Sources of career information, lifestyle development, advantages and disadvantages of each source, and methods of storing and disseminating information will be explored. An understanding of career development assessment and career counseling techniques will be explored. Current issues in college planning and school-to-work transition programming will be explored.

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psy5230

This is an introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the basics of the need, meaning, and ethics of guidance services. Issues related to school guidance practices, with an overview of the role and function of the school counselor, will be reviewed. Specifically, student scheduling, testing and assessment, career guidance, and college placement will be emphasized. Current trends in the field, as well as general guidance issues, will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on the fact that the guidance counselor serves as part of a collaborative team with a strong focus on consultation.

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psy5240

This course will provide students with a broad, integrated perspective on the discipline of psychology and its practice. Students will begin with an overview of the philosophical ideas from which psychology developed. Major theoretical positions in psychology will be explored from an historical perspective moving to the present positions and focusing on current practice. These include: Structuralism, Functionalism, Behaviorism, Gestalt, Psychoanalysis, Social Learning, Information Processing, and Cognitive models. Emphasis is placed on the educational and clinical implications of these basic positions. The neurological basis of learning and memory will be considered also. The student will develop an understanding of current trends in practice through a basic understanding of the theoretical foundations of psychology.

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psy5241

An in-depth look at the juvenile justice system from its historical origins to current practices. Special emphasis is placed on juvenile justice terminology, landmark cases, and procedures used with juveniles and their families. The social, economic, and racial considerations of juveniles in difficulty with the law will be considered.

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psy5215

This course will examine in some detail the influence of psychoanalytic, interpersonal/social, cognitive, and behavioristic theories on present therapeutic techniques. Each style of counseling is evaluated and the relationship between the nature of the disturbance and the effectiveness of each approach is discussed. The response to counseling of those from various racial and cultural groups will be considered. Classroom discussion will be used in conjunction with film and audio tape presentations to translate theoretical understanding into effective counseling behavior.

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psy5225

This course will provide students with a solid basis in General Systems Theory. Coverage will include theories and techniques that could be used by the psychologist in dealing with the family. Topics will include initial interview skills, therapeutic intervention techniques, and the application of systems theory to the family setting. Included will be usefulness and application of theory to culturally diverse groups, single parent, and blended families.

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psy5205

This course links statistical analysis and research methodology in order that the student may become a sophisticated research consumer as well as research producer. The student must learn to understand the logic of the research enterprise and have a basic grasp of the conceptual base on which the statistical tests of significance rest. Understanding research strategy and the logic behind the statistical tests is the underlying theme of the course. This will allow students to understand the nature of empirical research in developing education interventions and therapeutic strategies. Students are also required to learn the SPSS computer program.

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psy4830

This meets the requirement as a writing intensive course in the major. This course addresses the roots of modern psychological thought and methodology, from their origins in philosophy and the natural sciences through the refinement of psychology in its current form. The major theories, schools of thought, and the people who have influenced the field of psychology will be examined. This course also serves as preparation for students who will be taking Graduate Record Examinations and for graduate study in psychology.

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psy4899

Students are placed in off-campus settings such as detention centers, hospitals, senior citizen centers, alternative schools, and halfway houses. Journals are maintained reflecting the student’s activities and reflections while at the practicum site. An academic paper with citations from psychological literature is required, covering some aspect of the practicum experience (i. e. client population, treatment approach, strategy for change, etc. ). Detailed plans for the practicum are made in consultation with the instructor. A practicum completed in another department, which has an acceptable psychological component, may be used to fulfill this requirement.

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psy5036

Coverage includes descriptive statistics: central tendency, variability, transformed scores, graphing, skewness and kurtosis. Also included will be probability and inferential statistics, including z test, t tests (one and two sample), ANOVA, Chi square and the Pearson r. Basic preparation in mathematics is needed.

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psy4698

Part one of a two-part course. In these courses a student pursues in depth an individualized program of reading and/or research with a specific faculty member. These courses may be repeated for credit with permission of the department up to a total of six credits.

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psy4798

Part two of a two-part course. In these courses a student pursues in depth an individualized program of reading and/or research with a specific faculty member. These courses may be repeated for credit with permission of the department up to a total of six credits.

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psy4615

In this course, the student conducts his/her own original research project under the close supervision of the instructor. The project encompasses all phases of the research endeavor from conceptualization of the question, through data collection and analysis, to the written report in the format of the APA. Especially recommended for psychology majors considering graduate school.

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psy4245

The Topics in Psychology course addresses special topics not ordinarily covered in other departmental courses and often provides students with cutting-edge insights and experiences. Topics will vary each semester based on the expertise of the faculty member teaching the course. Students will be expected to read current research and literature on the selected topic, engage in class discussions of the reading, and complete a course project.

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psy4598

A number of advanced psychology majors are selected each semester by the psychology department to act as TAs (teaching assistants) in several undergraduate courses. The TAs are expected to deliver lectures, be involved in an active tutoring program, and to assist in both creating and scoring exams and quizzes; in short, to be involved actively in the total teaching process.

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psy3615

This is a laboratory course dealing with the nature of science and scientific research methods. Although the emphasis is on experimentation, quasi-experimental designs and other research methods are covered in detail. Students carry out research projects, analyze the results, and write APA-style research reports describing the research project.

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psy4000

This course surveys the available instruments, tests, inventories, and questionnaires in current use today. Emphasis is placed on the practical use of psychological measurements in education and psychological practice in business and industrial settings. The theoretical assumptions of assessment, the technical characteristics of good tests, and the systems of test score reporting are covered as they apply to the use of tests and test results.

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psy4001

This course is designed for students to gain an understanding about specific psychological and psychiatric disturbances that afflict teenagers ages 13 to 21. Topics include teen depression, delinquent behavior, alcohol abuse, suicide and homicide, affective disorders, schizophrenia, eating disorders, and a brief introduction to family and network therapy.

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psy3607

This course examines human behavior as it is affected by various social situations. Topics include the study of attitudes, social attribution, altruism, aggression, group behavior, and interpersonal attraction, among others.

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psy3609

This course will introduce students to social influence – from the theoretical origins in psychology to its applications in psychology, sociology, political science, and business. The main goal of the course is to illuminate the social forces that impact people’s daily lives – from choosing a brand of toothpaste to implementing organizational changes. By seeing how social influences operate in everyday situations, student can better understand why they feel and act as they do. Additionally, students will become more aware of attempts to influence them, and will be more adept at influencing others.

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psy3612

In this course, theories and research directed toward understanding individual differences in thought, feeling and behavior are considered. Major focus will be on psychodynamic, humanistic, behavioral, cognitive, and trait perspectives. Psychotherapies will be examined as implementations of personality theory.

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psy3600

This course examines the historical perspectives of abnormal behavior, and the nature, classification, etiology, and treatment of a variety of psychopathologies. Intended for majors in psychology, nursing, criminal justice, occupational therapy, physical therapy, special education, and human services.

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psy3000

This course surveys industrial and organizational applications of psychology. Principles of individual differences are discussed that relate to career choice, career advancement, management, and the workplace environment.

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psy3422

This course is an introduction to the physiological basis of psychology. It focuses on the human brain and nervous system as they relate to topics such as learning, memory, motivation, sensation, sleep, drugs, and mental disorders.

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psy2620

This course examines aspects of psychology related to human learning and the educational process. The course surveys topics such as learning, thinking, memory, intelligence, creativity, testing, motivation, and mental development that are vital to teachers and valuable to anyone engaged in learning.

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psy2820

This course is a continuation of PSY2302, including a brief review of the material previously covered, such as probability, sampling, and hypothesis testing for both parametric and non-parametric analysis. Presented for the first time are such topics as Factor Analysis of Variance, the within-subjects Analysis of Variance, the paired t-test, and Chi-Square.

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psy2821

An experiential lab to accompany PSY2820, this course emphasizes the entry, calculation, and interpretation of statistical analyses using SPSS. Students will also learn and practice writing up statistical analyses in APA format. Exercises follow the statistical tests presented in PSY328.

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psy2617

An introductory examination of the field of human cognition. Topics include perception, attention, short and long-term memory, problem solving, and decision making. Emphasis will be on understanding the scientific nature of the discipline.

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psy2600

This meets the requirement as a writing intensive course in the major. This course provides an overview of the fundamental skills to the study of psychology. Students should develop a better understanding of how to succeed in the major and psychology-related professions. Recommended for sophomores.

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psy2610

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of health psychology. It is an extremely useful course for those planning to enter the healthcare field. The focus will be on adults; however, pediatric issues will also be covered. This course will examine the history of health psychology, mind-body connections, the effects of stress, and behavioral factors in illness. More specifically, this course will examine coronary heart disease, hypertension, cancer, psychoneuroimmunology, chronic pain, obesity, and smoking cessation. General issues such as compliance with medical regimens and psychological disorders that may affect proper compliance with medical regimens will also be covered.

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psy2420

This course will focus on the many different aspects of death and dying. Some of the topics include: grief and bereavement, the hospice philosophy, children and death and dying, and AIDS. This course is appropriate for psychology and sociology majors, nurses and nursing students, gerontology students, and anyone interested in exploring this most fascinating subject.

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psy2450

The purpose of this course is to examine the concepts of human development, from conception to old age. Specifically, the course looks at how physical, cognitive, and socioemotional factors interact to influence learning, intelligence, language development, and the growth of personality. Major theories and the research that supports or refutes them are examined.

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psy2410

Life cycle studies have recently focused upon the middle and older years of the life span. These studies have revealed that the declines in aging aren’t as universal, precipitous, nor inevitable as previously thought; indeed, each decade in middle years has its theme and task. It has also been found that many of the changes we associate with old age actually began during earlier periods of life. The focus in this course is on the origin and nature of these individual changes and phases.

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psy2414

Human sexuality is examined from biological, cultural, and psychological perspectives. Topics include sexual anatomy, childbirth, contraception, abortion, sexual development, sexual attitudes, adult sexual behavior, and alternative sexual lifestyles.

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psy2408

This course is a study of adolescent behavior, including current theories concerning the nature of adolescence. Emphasis is placed on physical, emotional, and cognitive forces, and how they interact to shape the adolescent personality.

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psy1401

This course covers the basic principles of behavior, that make up the foundation of psychology. Emphasis is placed on the biological basis of behavior, sensation, perception, learning, language, memory, thinking, infancy, and childhood. The methods of inquiry used in psychology are also emphasized.

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psy1501

continuation of PSY1401, with an emphasis on the application of psychology to contemporary life. Topics include: motivation and emotion; social behavior; adolescence and adulthood; personality; abnormal behavior and psychotherapy; stress, health, and psychology of the workplace.

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psy2302

This course is an introduction to statistical methods as they are used in the social sciences. Both descriptive and inferential statistics are covered, including sampling, probability, and hypothesis testing. Specific parametric and non-parametric analyses include analysis of variance, the t-test, Chi-square, and correlation.

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pol5224

Provides opportunities for understanding federal, state, and foundation sources of public finance, with an emphasis on proposal development, organizational development and change, and grant writing. Lectures, small-group problem solving, and a variety of speakers will be utilized to cover course material.

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pol5744

This course examines the ethical, moral, and legal dilemmas of public, private, and nonprofit management decision-making. Through case study analysis students will gain insight into the appearance versus the actual conflicts of interest; learn how to prevent fraud, waste and abuse; and establish a zero tolerance for issues of personal gain, influence peddling and other corrupt practices common to the work environment. Special topics will focus on crafting appropriate codes of ethics and standards of conduct for both employer and employee to strengthen management and organizational ethics and culture.

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pol6999

This capstone course requires students to apply the knowledge learned in the MPA program in a comprehensive, experiential project focused on analyzing and proposing recommendations to a significant issue within a governmental agency or masters thesis involving substantial research focused in public administration specific to a student’s area of interest. Students will be required to present their project or research in a public forum.

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pol5214

This course examines the process of policy formulation, techniques of policy analysis, and execution of public policy. Content will address the issues of policy development, legislative enactment, implementation, enforcement, and evaluation. Through case study analysis, students will map out the theoretical and practical approaches to current public policy issues.

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pol4899

During the spring semester, students participate in a formal internship program at the New York State Assembly in Albany. The program includes completion of an academic course, a four-day orientation about the state legislative process, and seminar discussions. Students work 30 hours per week for a member of the assembly, doing legislative research, constituent relations, and other administrative tasks. Students must be accepted into this program to participate.

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pol5204

This course explores process, politics and policy of federal, state, and local budgeting for twenty-first century challenges. Students will examine procedures, performance, and accountability of public budgeting in three ways: control over expenditure; program management; and long-term policy planning. Students will analyze performance-based budgeting and political vs. managerial budgeting approaches, as well as gain an understanding of the social impact of conflict and prioritizing inherent in public budget decision-making.

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pol4870

In this course, students will learn the research process. Special emphasis will be placed on research design. At a minimum, students will conduct a literature review, formulate a research question, and choose the appropriate research methods to answer that question. It is expected that students’ topics will flow from their course work in political science.

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pol4889

An internship in a government office, social agency, or research department is required.

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pol4894

This is a series of independent readings to be conducted under the instructor’s supervision.

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pol3660

This course surveys the ideas of leading political thinkers from ancient times to the Renaissance. Figures such as Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, St. Thomas, and Machiavelli will be discussed.

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pol3661

This course surveys the ideas of leading political thinkers from early modernity through to the present day. Figures such as Bodin, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Burke, Hegel, Marx, and Mill will be discussed.

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pol3700

This course studies American political thought from its Puritan origins to present day. The course is organized around defining moments of political thought, such as the Revolution, Constitutional Founding, Civil War, Great Depression, and Civil Rights Movement, with selections from mainstream and radical voices in each period. Readings include selections from James Madison, John Adams, Abraham Lincoln, Emma Goldman, Eugene Debs, and Martin Luther King, Jr.

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pol3500

A study of the historical role of the U. S. Supreme Court and its impact on American society, including an examination of issues of political theory and major court cases.

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pol3642

Organized thematically, this course explores diverse issues current in modern political thought and pertinent to contemporary governments and societies.

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pol3420

A study is made of the fundamental concepts of international law and diplomacy. Particular attention will be devoted to the significance and application of these concepts in international relations.

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pol3460

In this course, an inquiry is made into the role of multinational corporations in international relations. A broad range of ideas and issues are explored, including; an analysis of states and corporations as juristic entities; business transactions and world politics; corporate interest and national interest; multinationals as precursors of integrated global system; role of international law and diplomacy; and multinationals’ impact on national employment, taxation, and balance of payments. This course is not open to freshmen.

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pol3413

This course will examine the nature and significance of the American radical tradition from the American Revolution to the present-day. Among the radical philosophies and movements to be covered will be the socialism and communism; civil rights; Black power; feminism; the New Left; environmentalism; the gay and lesbian movement; and the global justice movement. Examination of the American radical tradition suggests that radicalism has been a persistent and significant feature of American history.

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pol3410

The impact of international organizations on relationships among nations is examined and discussed. There will be special focus on the role of major institutions such as the United Nations, World Bank, International Monetary Fund, World Trade Organizations, European Union, OAS, NATO, and OPEC.

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pol3412

This course consists of an analysis of contemporary problems in the world community in light of the theories and concepts of international politics.

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pol3402

In this course a study is done of the aims, instruments, and conduct of American foreign relations, with particular reference to contemporary problems. Students will participate in case studies.

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pol3401

This course will examine the international history of the Cold War. Special emphasis will be placed not only on the rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union, but also on how the entire world between 1945 and 1991 was influenced by the competition between the different ideologies and socio-economic systems that those countries represented. It also will suggest how the Cold War has continued to infulence our present era.

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pol3327

The Second World War was the bloodiest conflict in recent history. It had a profound impact on our world. This discussion-based course will explore the international system in the 1920s and 1930s and the various factors that led to the outbreak of the conflict in Europe and Asia. It will then examine the course of the global war itself, including its impact on civilians. Finally, it will consider the consequences of the war and how it is remembered in various countries today.

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pol3400

A study is made of the politics and problems of implementing governmental policies with particular emphasis on organization, management, personnel, finances, responsibility, and bureaucracy.

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pol2620

This course is the study of nature, function, and power of the Supreme Court in the American political system via study of its decisions. Emphasis is placed on cases about separation of powers, federalism, and economic liberties.

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pol2630

effectiveness of the legal system in protecting and promoting individual rights are examined and discussed via a reading of constitutional case law. Special attention is given to rights of the accused, freedom of speech and religion.

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pol3325

The First World War was arguably the most important event of the twentieth century. It had a profound impact on international relations, political ideas, the conduct of war, the global economy, Western society, and culture and the arts. It altered the map of both Europe and the Middle East and set the stage for another world war as well as for decolonization. We are still living with many of its legacies today. This discussion-based course will begin by reviewing the nineteenth century international system and discuss the reasons why the war broke out in August 1914. It will then examine the course of the war on all its fronts as well as its effects on the home fronts of the belligerent countries, including on the arts and literature. Finally, it will consider the Paris Peace Settlement of 1919 and war’s long term consequences, including its place in historical memory around the world.

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pol2510

The student will study political concepts, institutions, and processes in the Middle Eastern political systems.

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pol2520

This course examines the role of the media in political life, considering its roles in polling, setting the agenda, and providing political information. The structure of the media, including its ownership, will be studied as will its influence as an interest group.

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pol2610

This course will explore the topic of European integration from a variety of perspectives, including those of history, political science and sociology. The first half of the course will concentrate on the pre-history of the European communities leading to the creation of the European Union in November 1993. Then it will look at the European Union’s institutions and how they function, the relationship between the member states and the EU, and special issues that face the EU today.

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pol2420

The powers, function, and inherent conflicts of the Congress and the presidency are examined with emphasis placed on the historical development of institutions.

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pol2450

This course is a study of the organizations, characters, bases, and operations of party systems with emphasis on the United States. The historical development of the parties is investigated.

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pol2500

This course examines the structure of both presidential and congressional elections and the resultant consequences of those structures. The historical development of elections is emphasized. A case study of either the presidential or congressional midterm election will be analyzed with special attention given to campaign strategies.

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pol2400

This course focuses on the politics, institutions, and policy processes of state and local governments. State and local governments provide essential services, suchas education and policing, and are considered the building blocks of democracy. In this course, comparisons will be made among states but much attention will be paid to the state of Massachusetts and city of Springfield.

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pol2410

This course is a study of the international community and of the forces that determine political relations among the nation states it comprises. Consideration is given to the character of the nation state, the nature and determinants of political power in a multistate system, and the conduct of diplomacy.

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pol1400

This course provides an overview of American politics and government, focusing on Constitutional principles, national institutions of governance, and politics actors, such as political parties and the media.

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pol1500

This course provides acomparative examination of governmental and political systems, with the American system considered as point of comparison in some cases. The corse will focus on one or two areas of the world, such as the Middle East or Europe.

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pol1000

This course provides an overview of the discipline of political science, including its division into the four fields of political theory, American Politics, comparative politics and international relations. Students will learn basic concepts in politics and analyze governmental types, forms of political participation, and political socialization.

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phy2094

Students may conduct directed research studies in physics under the supervision and direction of the chairperson. Credit may vary from one to three credits, dependent on the scope and depth of the proposed work. Approved study that includes use of laboratory facilities may be conducted for four credits. Students wishing to enroll must submit a plan of study to the physics department for approval. Laboratory fee may apply.

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phy1801

A continuation of PHY 1601. Experiments will be selected for the study of electricity, magnetism, light, and modern physics. One three-hour laboratory session per week with laboratory and breakage fees. CO-REQUISITES: PHY1800

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phy1800

This is a continuation of PHY1600 covering the fundamental principles of electricity, magnetism, light, and modern physics. The course is taught without calculus.

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phy1601

This course covers basic laboratory techniques in physics and illustration of the principles of physics through laboratory experiments. Students will become familiar with the processes and nature of making scientific measurements and the analysis of relationships between physical quantities. Experiments will be selected for the study of mechanics, vibration, and thermodynamics. One three-hour laboratory session per week with laboratory and breakage fees. CO-REQUISITES: PHY1600

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phy1200

A conceptual approach is used to understand the human body as a living system governed by the basic laws of physics. Topics include forces exerted by muscles, circulation of blood, nerve conduction, vision, perception of sound, and effects of radiation. Lectures are augmented with demonstrations requiring student participation.

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phy1210

Students perform a series of experiments on force, torque, energy, heat, electricity, sound, and optics to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of the physical principle on which the human body functions. These experiments also include making EKGs, studying galvanic skin response, respiration, and pulse rates. One two-hour laboratory session per week with laboratory and breakage fees.

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phy1600

This is a basic course that covers the fundamental principles of mechanics, vibration, and thermodynamics. Newton’s laws of motion will be applied to a broad range of practical problems involving real phenomena. The laws of thermodynamics will be utilized to study thermal processes and properties. Students will learn to develop working equations from basic concepts in order to solve problems. The course is taught without calculus.

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phy1050

This is a general, introductory course in astronomy. Students study the physical properties and concepts concerning motion, gravitation, light, and atoms. Students will explore the Earth-Moon system, the Solar System, the tools used by astronomers, and the life cycles of stars and galaxies. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding. Students must also enroll in PHY115L to meet laboratory science requirements for general education.

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phy1051

A series of selected laboratory experiences to teach the fundamentals of scientific thinking and research and to support course content. Experiments will include a study of gravity, light, optics, and spectroscopy. Telescope observations will be made of the sun and one additional night observation as conditions permit. One two-hour laboratory session per week with laboratory and breakage fees.

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phy1055

This course is intended for students who have already completed the laboratory science general education requirement. Students study the physical properties and concepts concerning motion, gravitation, light, and atoms. Students will explore the Earth-Moon system, the Solar System, the tools used by astronomers, and the life cycles of stars and galaxies. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding.

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phy1030

Via the science and technologies used in sports, entertainment, and recreation together with those used in the military, now and throughout history, the field of physics will be investigated. The concepts of motion, force, energy, momentum, electricity, magnetism, optics, and atomic systems will be explored both conceptually and in their applications to recreation and the military. Students must also enroll in PHY1011 to meet laboratory science requirements for general education.

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phy1031

A series of selected laboratory experiences to teach the fundamentals of scientific thinking and research and to support course content. Experiments on force, energy, heat, electricity, circuits, and optics will be conducted. One two-hour laboratory session per week with laboratory and breakage fees.

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phy1040

This course is intended for students who have already completed the laboratory science general education requirement. Following a systems approach, students will first learn what the building blocks of Earth are and the processes they undergo. Then students will study the features and processes that continuously reshape Earth’s surface. A study will follow of Earth’s interior and the processes driven from within that bear upon its surface. We will then study Earth’s oceans, the atmosphere, weather, and climate. Of particular importance will be the effects of the sun on Earth.

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phy1020

General, introductory earth science following a systems approach. Students will first learn what the building blocks of Earth are and the processes they undergo. Then the features and processes that continuously reshape Earth’s surface will be studied. Following will be a study of Earth’s interior and the processes driven from within that bear upon its surface. We will then study Earth’s oceans, the atmosphere, weather, and climate. Of particular importance will be the effects of the sun on Earth. Students must also enroll in PHY112L to meet laboratory science requirements for general education.

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phy1021

General, introductory earth science following a systems approach. Students will first learn what the building blocks of Earth are and the processes they undergo. Then the features and processes that continuously reshape Earth’s surface will be studied. Following will be a study of Earth’s interior and the processes driven from within that bear upon its surface. We will then study Earth’s oceans, the atmosphere, weather, and climate. Of particular importance will be the effects of the sun on Earth. Students must also enroll in PHY1020 to meet laboratory science requirements for general education.

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phy1011

Physics 1011 Lab consists of a series of two-hours labs taken from physics, chemistry, astronomy, and earth science. Lab topics include: motion, force, electricity, optics, physical and chemical change, ion identification, ion replacement and exchange reactions, properties of hydrogen and oxygen, crystal growth, and properties of minerals and rocks among others. PHY1010 and PHY1011 together complete one 4-credit lab science general education requirement.

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phi2030

This course explores the context of the relationship that spirituality/religion may have on healing and considers the contemporary pioneers highlighting spirituality’s role in healing. Students in this course will explore spirituality’s concrete expression in a number of faith communities and their cultural understandings of disease, illness, healing, health and wellness. This course will offer insights to the support healing through attentiveness to the patients’ interior life and encourages students to assimilate their own spirituality and/or religion for effective healing throughout their professional career.

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phy1010

An introduction to the fundamental concepts of the physical sciences. Topics in physics, chemistry, astronomy, and earth science will be studied. How these four areas of science are interrelated will be emphasized. Students must also enroll in PHY1011L to meet laboratory science requirements for general education.

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phi2010

This course is designed to be a hands-on survey of major religions of the world. In addition to reading the texts, students will visit a mosque, synagogue, and church. The objective of the course is to determine key doctrinal points of each faith, identify common threads in each, and observe how people practice their faith today.

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phi1200

This course provides a critical examination of several philosophical problems, including the nature and scope of knowledge, the freedom-determinism issue, the question of the existence of a God, and the status of moral judgments.

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phi1400

This course offers an introduction to, and critical analysis of, problems in philosophy, with special stress on those value aspects bearing directly upon the formulation of a philosophy of life. Selections from fiction and poetry, as well as the more traditional form of philosophic exposition, are read and discussed.

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pch4899

Focuses on selecting and applying effective strategies and skills to plan, develop, and implement a culminating project that integrates coursework and internship experience. Provides students with the opportunity to focus on a key health issue in the community and/or one that is related to their intended career goals as a public health professional.

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phi1000

This course offers a careful examination of the various standards that must be observed if one is to read, write, and think critically. It surveys common sources of confusion and error, such as ambiguity, vagueness, propaganda, political rhetoric, misleading advertising, misuse of evidence, improper reliance upon authority and tradition, and other varieties of fallacious reasoning.

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pch3632

Focuses on the knowledge, skills, and strategies needed for planning, implementing, and evaluating health education programs to facilitate health behavior changes in individuals, groups, and communities.

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pch4430

This course focuses on the integration of public health knowledge, skills, and practice acquired during the program. Emphasis will be on summarizing, analyzing and synthesizing major key concepts and critically evaluating strategies to impact the health of the public. Focus will be on current health challenges locally and globally.

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pch3630

Overview of community health within the context of public health practice. Students will discuss foundations of community health, explore major health concerns, analyze determinants of health, and evaluate strategies to improve health of communities.

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pch3066

The internship provides an opportunity for each student to apply the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the program by working under the guidance and direction of a public health professional. With the guidance of their program advisor, students may choose to complete the practicum in a public health setting that is of interest to them and aligns well with their career goals.

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pch3200

The course will be situated within the historical context of the United States, including the social, political, economic, cultural, legal, and ethical theories related to health disparities. Several frameworks regarding health disparities will be used for investigating and discussing the empirical evidence on disparities, research and outcome measurement issues, policy and policy formation concerns, and intervention practices. Disparities will be discussed in terms of racial/ethnic differences in health and health outcomes as well as disparities among other subgroups (e. g., the poor, women, uninsured, disabled, and non-English speaking populations) will also be included and discussed.

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pch3250

The ecological position of human populations within the global ecosystem and impacts of natural environmental factors and pollutants on human health will be explored. Specifically, how the body reacts to environmental pollutants; physical, chemical, and biological agents of environmental contamination; vectors for dissemination (air, water, soil); solid and hazardous waste; susceptible populations; biomarkers and risk analysis; the scientific basis for policy decisions; and emerging global environmental health problems.

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pch2030

Overview of major global health issues; the socioeconomic, biological, and environmental causes and consequences of disease; and global health metrics, ethics, policies, and practices.

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pch2040

Provides an introduction to principles of epidemiology, with a focus on preparation to read an interpret research in public health.

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pch3031

This course will examine the essential concepts, principles, organizational skills, and political processes integral to the development, formation, and analysis of public health policy. Senior Level.

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otr6240

This is an extention of OTR6239. The Level II Fieldwork assignments provide students with the opportunity to apply an academically acquired body of knowledge to an in-depth clinical experience in the delivery of occupational therapy services to clients and their families or caregivers. The OT student practitioner (OTS), as evaluated by AOTA’s Fieldwork Performance Evaluation for the Occupational Therapy Student will demonstrate competencies in: fundamentals of practice, basic tenets, evaluation and screening, intervention, management of occupational therapy services, communication, and professional behaviors. Students will be graded on a pass/fail basis. Level II Fieldwork sites are frequently at a distance from the College and/or the student’s home. Student preferences for site selection will be taken into consideration but there is no guarantee that the preferences will be granted. Students are required to accept and to attend the fieldwork placements as assigned to them by the Academic Fieldwork Coordinator. Students are responsible for assuming all costs associated with travel to and from all sites, as well as transportation, food, housing and personal health insurance. Students selecting a fieldwork site that requires a supervision fee are required to assume personal financial responsibility. Completion of Level II Fieldwork will not exceed one year from the end of didactic course work unless approved by the program director.

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otr8000

This course provides a historical perspective for the evolution of the profession of occupational therapy. The role of occupational therapist is viewed within the context of synthesizing current theories, service delivery settings, models of practice, and current research related to the practice of occupational therapy. The structure and function of the profession will be identified, including the guiding principles and ethical standards, and the important professional organizations, i. e. AOTA, ACOTE, NBCOT, and WFOT. Legal issues such as state licensure and malpractice will also be examined. Students will study the domain and process of occupational therapy practice and apply their knowledge of the discipline of occupational science to the profession of occupational therapy.

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pch1030

Overview of the basic principles of public health practice, including the infrastructure of public health, the tools employed by public health practitioners, biopsychosocial perspectives of public health problems, health promotion and prevention of disease and injury, quality assurance and improvement, and legal and ethical concerns.

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otr6239

The Level II Fieldwork assignments provide students with the opportunity to apply an academically acquired body of knowledge to an in-depth clinical experience in the delivery of occupational therapy services to clients and their families or caregivers. The OT student practitioner (OTS), as evaluated by AOTA’s Fieldwork Performance Evaluation for the Occupational Therapy Student will demonstrate competencies in: fundamentals of practice, basic tenets, evaluation and screening, intervention, management of occupational therapy services, communication, and professional behaviors. Students will be graded on a pass/fail basis. Level II Fieldwork sites are frequently at a distance from the College and/or the student’s home. Student preferences for site selection will be taken into consideration but there is no guarantee that the preferences will be granted. Students are required to accept and to attend the fieldwork placements as assigned to them by the Academic Fieldwork Coordinator. Students are responsible for assuming all costs associated with travel to and from all sites, as well as transportation, food, housing and personal health insurance. Students selecting a fieldwork site that requires a supervision fee are required to assume personal financial responsibility. Completion of Level II Fieldwork will not exceed one year from the end of didactic course work unless approved by the program director.

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otr6200

This is the third course in the comprehensive exam series that addresses practice areas related to physical disabilities and pediatrics. The course stresses developing critical reasoning skills within the context of the exam. Active learning is emphasized, with practice in reading, interpreting, and answering multiple choice and clinical simulation questions to help assess strengths and weaknesses.

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otr6033

This course teaches students to provide client centered, evidence-based services for the growing cohort of older adults. Students will explain the interaction between the aging process and disability and explore how this impacts performance and engagement in occupation for both the client and any supporters/caregivers of clients.

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otr6130

This course precedes the Level II Fieldwork experience and examines the respective roles and responsibilities of the student, fieldwork supervisor, and academic fieldwork coordinator. Fieldwork goals and objectives, and the criteria for student evaluation will be clarified. Students will also be instructed regarding national certification (NBCOT), the application process for the certification exam, and licensure requirements and procedures. Classroom discussion topics will emphasize communication skills, supervision, and professionalism related to fieldwork and future practice.

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otr6139

The Level II Fieldwork assignments provide students with the opportunity to apply an academically acquired body of knowledge to an in-depth clinical experience in the delivery of occupational therapy services to clients and their families or caregivers. The OT student practitioner (OTS), as evaluated by AOTA’s Fieldwork Performance Evaluation for the Occupational Therapy Student will demonstrate competencies in: fundamentals of practice, basic tenets, evaluation and screening, intervention, management of occupational therapy services, communication, and professional behaviors. Students will be graded on a pass/fail basis. Level II Fieldwork sites are frequently at a distance from the College and/or the student’s home. Student preferences for site selection will be taken into consideration but there is no guarantee that the preferences will be granted. Students are required to accept and to attend the fieldwork placements as assigned to them by the Academic Fieldwork Coordinator. Students are responsible for assuming all costs associated with travel to and from all sites, as well as transportation, food, housing and personal health insurance. Students selecting a fieldwork site that requires a supervision fee are required to assume personal financial responsibility. Completion of Level II Fieldwork will not exceed one year from the end of didactic course work unless approved by the program director.

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otr6030

This course is designed to apply knowledge of biological, physical, behavioral, and psychosocial development of children to pediatric occupational therapy practice. Students will apply an occupation-based and client-centered approach to evaluation and intervention in a variety of occupational therapy practice contexts including schools, hospital settings, rehabilitation centers, mental health programs, and community, and home-based settings. Theoretical perspectives that integrate person, environment, and occupation will be stressed as a foundation for understanding physical and psychosocial pathology in child and adolescent populations. Research evidence from journal articles will supplement the text material to identify the most effective assessments and interventions currently available in the arena of pediatric practice. Students will synthesize knowledge of evaluation techniques including standardized tests and behavioral scales, as well as motor, sensory, or behavioral treatment approaches. They will apply clinical reasoning/problem solving to select appropriate tools, interpret, and document assessment data, and determine the appropriate occupational interventions for the age and functional level of the child. Level I Fieldwork with children and adolescents with physical and/or psychosocial disabilities will be provided to permit students to apply classroom learning to real-life clinical experience.

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otr6031

This course is designed to apply knowledge of behavioral and psychosocial development to the practice of occupational therapy with adolescents and adults who exhibit psychosocial dysfunction affecting occupational performance. Students will apply an occupation-based and client-centered approach to evaluation and intervention in a variety of occupational therapy practice contexts including hospital settings, rehabilitation centers, mental health programs, and work, community, and home-based settings. Theoretical perspectives that integrate person, environment, and occupation will be stressed as a foundation for understanding psychosocial pathology in young to aging adult populations. Research evidence from journal articles will supplement the text material to identify the most effective assessments and interventions currently available in the arena of mental health. Students will synthesize knowledge gained from developed competencies in conducting basic evaluation and intervention planning to utilize clinical reasoning/problem solving in the appropriate selection and analysis of assessment data, the setting of effective intervention goals and objectives, and the selection of appropriate treatment media and activities to enhance occupational performance. Level I Fieldwork with adult clients with psychosocial disabilities will be provided to permit students to apply classroom learning to real-life clinical experience.

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otr6032

This course is designed to apply biomechanical, neurobiological, and occupation-based models and frames of reference for occupational therapy intervention with adults with physical dysfunction. Students will apply an occupation-based and client-centered approach to identification of appropriate evaluation and intervention strategies for clients in a variety of occupational therapy practice contexts including hospital settings, rehabilitation centers, intermediate and long-term care facilities, and home environments. Students will synthesize knowledge of the use standardized evaluation tools, research-based intervention strategies and adaptive techniques, to utilize clinical reasoning/problem solving strategies for establishing effective client-centered intervention plans to enable maximum independence in occupational performance. The ability to identify and synthesize research evidence from appropriate sources to identify the most effective assessments and interventions in the arena of physical disabilities will be emphasized. Level I Fieldwork with adult clients with physical disabilities will be provided to permit students to apply classroom learning to real-life clinical experience.

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otr5525

This is the first course in the comprehensive exam series that addresses domain areas related to the foundations of occupational therapy. The course stresses developing critical reasoning skills within the context of the exam. Active learning is emphasized, with practice in reading, interpreting, and answering multiple choice and clinical simulation questions to help assess strengths and weaknesses.

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otr5531

This course is designed to prepare the student for supervision and management issues related to future clinical practice. The management portion of this course will present management theory pertinent to the occupational therapy/health care industry. Organizational behavior and structure will be discussed in relation to professional organizations that influence the delivery of occupational therapy services. Management principles and strategies involved in the managerial functions of planning, organizing, staffing, budgeting, directing, evaluating and marketing will be examined and applied during class and individual assignments. Classroom discussion topics will emphasize communication skills, supervision and professionalism.

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otr5600

This is the second course in the comprehensive exam series that addresses practice areas related to management and psychosocial occupations. The course stresses developing critical reasoning skills within the context of the exam. Active learning is emphasized, with practice in reading, interpreting, and answering multiple choice and clinical simulation questions to help assess strengths and weaknesses.

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otr5431

This course explores physical development and functioning as it relates to occupational performance from early to late adulthood. Changes in the human body affecting skeletal, muscular, neurological, cardiopulmonary, and sensory systems will be examined. Functional implications on development and maintenance of occupational roles will be analyzed, and the importance of purposeful activity to maintain wellness will be highlighted. The integration of person, environment, and occupation will be stressed when applying theoretical principles to pathologic conditions, and in developing support systems to enable optimal occupational performance throughout adult life. Therapeutic assessment and intervention for occupational dysfunction in this age range will be introduced. Level I Fieldwork is integrated within the course work, affording the opportunity to apply classroom experiences to real life clinical experiences.

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otr5432

This is the second of two courses examining the role of assistive technology in promoting optimal occupational functioning across the lifespan. Performance contexts and their impact on occupational performance and use of assistive technology with a focus on the occupations of adulthood will be examined. Assistive technology in the areas of ergonomics, environmental evaluation/adaptation and control, and community mobility will be addressed. Assistive technology interventions focused on increasing function and participation in home, work, school, and community contexts will be explored. Students will be required to apply activity analysis skills in problem solving and developing assistive technology interventions. Demonstration of competency in environmental evaluation, basic computer adaptations, and teaching compensatory strategies is expected by the end of the semester. Students will analyze the effects of technology on the lives of people with disabilities through readings, assignments, and Level I Fieldwork experiences.

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otr5433

This course examines the continuum of care for adult populations while exploring issues of service delivery within the medical and social systems. The class will focus on issues related to access, quality, and cost of health care. Students are challenged to recognize the influence of federal legislation and health care policy on current practice and to identify and analyze the social, economic, political, and demographic factors and trends that influence the delivery of health care in the United States. Students participate in Level I Fieldwork experiences in adult settings as part of this course.

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otr5430

This course explores psychosocial aspects of occupational performance among adult and older adult populations. Using the DSM-IV-R criterion, occupation and function are explored in varied contexts and phases of wellness, illness, and disability. With this fundamental knowledge, students will engage in clinical reasoning in the areas of evaluation, goal setting and treatment planning using a collaborative model and an emphasis on meaning and purposeful activity. The inter-relationship and inter-dependence of person, physical environment, and the larger social context will be reinforced through the application of theoretical principles. Assessment tools, theoretical approaches, intervention planning, and techniques appropriate to this age range will be explored. Level I Fieldwork is integrated within the course work affording the opportunity to apply classroom experiences to real life clinical experiences.

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otr5233

This course examines the continuum of care and methods of service delivery for pediatric populations in a variety of medical, educational, and social settings. Current issues affecting service delivery including access, quality, and cost will be identified and discussed. Students are challenged to recognize the influence of federal legislation and health care policy on current practice and to identify and analyze the social, economic, political, and demographic factors and trends that influence the delivery of pediatric practice in the United States. The occupational therapists emerging role within the context of health promotion, community, and public health will be discussed. Students participate in Level I Fieldwork experiences in pediatric/adolescent settings as part of this course.

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otr5240

As the second course in the research series, this course provides an opportunity for in-depth examination of the concepts, problems, needs, and issues involved in evaluating and conducting research in occupational therapy. The nature, relevance, and application of qualitative and quantitative research methods are examined as they relate to the development of an attitude of scholarly inquiry in this practice profession. The themes of evidence-based assessment and intervention, and outcomes measurement based in occupational performance resurface in the context of defining scholarship in occupational therapy. Students will develop beginning level research skills by initiating the development of a proposal for a scholarly project. Student outcomes will include the identification of a researchable problem/question and a review of the literature on a topical area.

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otr5232

This is the first of two courses examining the role of assistive technology in promoting optimal occupational functioning across the lifespan. This course will provide an introduction to the theories and principles of assistive technology intervention for occupational performance disruption during childhood and adolescence. Performance contexts and their impact on occupational performance and use of assistive technology will be examined. Various types of assistive technology used at home, in school, and in the community will be explored. Students will be required to apply activity analysis skills in problem solving and developing assistive technology interventions. Students will be introduced to the utilization of assessment data and assistive technology in the therapeutic process. Legal, ethical and funding issues will also be introduced. Student will participate in classroom activities and hands-on labs to construct simple assistive devices. Field trips and Level I Fieldwork observations and assignments will be used to apply classroom learning.

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otr5230

This course in the physical performance series addresses psychosocial development from birth to adolescence. Developmental theories and models of psychodynamics, cognition, behavior, and occupations are examined. The DSM-IV diagnostic categories for disorders of children and adolescents are included such as learning disabilities, pervasive developmental disorders, and anxiety disorders. Specific emphasis is on the emotional development, social interactions, and physical play environments of young children and adolescents. The effects of dysfunction on the occupations of the child/adolescent are studied including contextual effects on the family, and societal systems. Therapeutic assessment and intervention for occupational dysfunction in this age range will be explored. Level I Fieldwork is integrated within the course work affording the opportunity to apply classroom experiences to real life clinical experiences.

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otr5231

This course in the physical performance series addresses gross and fine motor development from birth to adolescence. Developmental theories and models of motor learning, sensory integration, acquisitioned, and perceptual motor are examined. Performance skills addressed include typical and atypical feeding patterns, postural development, mobility, and eye-hand coordination relative to development of self-care, educational, play, social, and pre-vocational occupations. Sensory motor dysfunction is addressed including but not limited to cerebral palsy, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, and congenital anomalies. The effects of dysfunction on the occupations of the child or adolescent are studied including contextual effects on the family, and societal systems. Therapeutic assessment and intervention for occupational dysfunction in this age range will be explored. Level I Fieldwork is integrated within the course work affording the opportunity to apply classroom experiences to real life clinical experiences.

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otr5200

This is the first course in the comprehensive exam series that addresses domain areas related to the foundations of occupational therapy. The course stresses developing critical reasoning skills within the context of the exam. Active learning is emphasized, with practice in reading, interpreting, and answering multiple choice and clinical simulation questions to help assess strengths and weaknesses.

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otr5140

This course provides information regarding the theory of group dynamics that includes communication, group process, group development, leadership styles, and group roles and norms. Human occupation, cognitive, and developmental models are introduced. Students will be required to apply activity analysis and observation skills as both group leaders and members. Students will participate in a community group during the semester.

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otr5150

This course is an introduction to the study of the movements of the human body. Students examine the major joint complexes of the body, including the skeletal, muscular and neurological contributions to movement at each joint, and consider the physical forces that influence human movement. Students also observe, analyze, and document using SOAP format the skilled movement patterns needed for occupational performance in daily life. The course material is presented in lecture and laboratory format and is supplemented with hands-on sessions for practicing range of motion and manual muscle testing skills on peers. Skeletal and anatomical models and audiovisual materials will complement the instructional process.

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otr5120

The course will explore the themes of building scientific knowledge as the basis for disciplinary development, using research evidence to answer clinical questions, and transforming clinical problems into researchable questions. The process of becoming a scholarly practitioner that utilizes research-based data to select assessment tools, develop goals, decide on intervention strategies, and measure outcomes will be discussed. The steps in the research process that includes generating a question, reviewing the existing literature, and designing a study that produces evidence to help answer the question, will be described and applied to learning activities. Course activities will include searching the literature using books, journals, and electronic databases; and analyzing peer-reviewed articles from occupational therapy and related journals to assess the validity and reliability of assessment instruments, the effectiveness of treatment interventions, and the use of statistics in testing and outcomes measurement.

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otr5130

Human gross anatomy is an examination of the structures of the human body. The course includes an in-depth presentation of the musculoskeletal system, with limited consideration of other body systems. The course material will be conveyed through lectures, laboratory experiences with human cadaver pro-sections, ADAM computerized dissections of the human body, audiovisual tapes, and anatomical models.

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otr5060

Through active participation in activities, this course will develop skills in analyzing activities of daily living, work and productive activities, play or leisure activities, and social participation. The analysis will include the physical and environmental requirements to perform activities. It will identify facilitators and barriers to performance including performance skills, client factors, activity demands, and contexts. The coursework will explore the relationship of activities to broader areas of occupation. The course will offer the students an opportunity to begin to develop skills in teaching, collaborative planning, and goal writing.

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otr5110

This course will utilize the guiding documents of the American Occupational Therapy Association the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process, 2nd edition to promote students’ ability to apply their understanding of the meaning and dynamics of occupation and activity as a foundation of OT evaluation, intervention and outcomes. Students will learn how to explain and justify the importance of supervisory roles, responsibilities, and collaborative professional relationships between the occupational therapist and the occupational therapy assistant utilizing AOTA’s official documents, including AOTA’s Standards of Practice. The course will promote the development of values and professional responsibilities related to being an occupational therapist including cultural competency, client-centered, occupation-based and evidenced-based practice.

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otr5050

This course presents the neurological foundations of human performance, behavior, and emotion through a variety of formats. Students will gain an understanding of the structure, function, and development of the nervous system and its influence on human behavior throughout the lifespan. This course explores how the nervous system functions, how it develops, and how it controls thoughts, emotions, and actions. Content will include anatomy, physiology, and functioning of the central and peripheral nervous systems, including clinical examples illustrating the impact of disease, trauma, learning, and developmental change on the everyday activities of people of all ages.

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otr5020

This on-line course utilizes an E-Textbook that is available at www. aicmedterm. com. This course is an on-line, computer-based course that is designed for occupational therapy students. The tutorial format has an 800 page online printable textbook. The E-Textbook includes 3000 color medical pictures that will visually assist students to understand why specific word parts were selected to form the thousands of specialized compound Medical & Scientific terms discussed in this course. In addition, the E-Textbook contains interactive audio-visual lecture pages that prepare each student for the 1000 self-testing flashcards and the 800 multiple choice self-test questions. Students are provided with an opportunity to study and replay the audio-visual online lectures and complete the self-testing activities at a convenient time and place.

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otr5030

This course is a specialized writing course that is focused on the writing skills necessary for clinical practice. This includes understanding the requirements of clinical documentation, and the mechanics of research writing. Students will learn how to research, outline concepts, document information, and cite sources using the American and Psychological Association (APA) format. Students will enhance their skills in observation and documenting observations, critically reading and interpreting information, comparing and contrasting written material, and comprehending quantitative vs. qualitative data. Students will experience multiple opportunities to practice and refine writing skills by using the language and terminology that is appropriate for screenings, evaluation, problem and goal statements, intervention plans, and progress notes.

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otr5040

This course provides students with an opportunity to survey and apply basic concepts, theories, and values that are the foundation of occupations in people’s lives from a global perspective and including concepts from sociology, psychology, and anthropology. Consideration of the occupational needs, history, and patterns of engagement of individuals across the life span will be studied in order to develop occupational profiles that include the influences of family, society, culture, and spirituality.

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nur6600

This course is a capstone experience in which the family nurse practitioner students continue to develop knowledge and expertise in the role as a primary care provider. Autonomy in clinical decision-making is emphasized. Family nurse practitioner students increase their levels of responsibility for independent client and family management.

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otr4444

This course is not part of the standard curriculum. Students may register for this course only by approval of the Program Director.

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otr5010

This course introduces students to the foundational principles of occupational therapy practice including historical perspectives, the philosophical base and current research of the profession. The course will utilize the guiding documents of the American Occupational Therapy Association the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process, 2nd edition to promote students’ understanding of the meaning and dynamics of occupation and activity as a foundation of OT evaluation, intervention and outcomes. Roles and responsibilities of the occupational therapy practitioner will be explored utilizing the AOTA Standards of Practice and Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics and Ethics Standards. The course will promote development of values related to being an occupational therapist including cultural competency, client-centered, occupation-based and evidenced-based practice.

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nur6540

First in a series of three clinical management courses for nurse practitioners. Focus of course is on application of advanced pathophysiology concepts and clinical decision making skills to interpret assessment data and develop diagnoses and treatment plans in primary care of clients and their families across the lifespan. The integration of research and evidence-based practice, teaching/health promotion, and consultation skills within the context of collaborative practice are emphasized.

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nur6550

Focus is on the delivery of care to clients and their families experiencing acute and chronic health problems. Continued emphasis on collaboration with the health care team in the implementation and the evaluation of accepted medical and nursing interventions used in the care of patients across the lifespan. Effective use of skills required for clinical management, education, consultation, referral, and follow-up are emphasized. Therapeutic interventions based upon evidenced-based research are integrated along with complementary and alternative healing approaches appropriate for individuals and their families with health care problems.

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nur6560

Opportunity to further develop leadership, research, teaching, and consultation skills as a basis for advanced clinical practice. Practice issues are explored within the context of ethical and effective use of resources for beginning autonomous practice. Course focuses on the management of complex health issues experienced by clients across the lifespan, with special emphasis on the elderly and other vulnerable populations. Theoretical concepts of organizational systems and health care politics and policy are applied to the advanced practice setting to identify and solve complex health and systems problems.

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nur6530

This course is designed to prepare advance practice nurses (APRN) to accurately describe, administer, and counsel patients regarding appropriate and safe medication regimens. In addition APRN students will be prepared medication prescriptive authority within their scope of practice. Basic pharmacologic principles and the pharmacologic actions of the major drug classes will be discussed in relation to physiologic systems, with emphasis on the application of these agents.

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nur6520

The role of the advanced practice nurse and the concepts of primary care within a contemporary health care system will be explored. Issues related to the role of the APN, regulation affecting practice, interprofessional collaboration, accountability and outcomes relevant to the APN practice will be examined.

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nur6149

Clinical practicum practice in nursing education is the focus of this course. Students begin their own reflective nursing education practice with the guidance of a mentor. A practicum project presentation is required.

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nur6249

Clinical practicum practice in nursing administration is the focus of this course. Students are mentored in a nursing administrative practice with an advanced practice nurse. A practicum project presentation is required.

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nur6510

Focuses on health assessment knowledge and skills needed by advanced practice nurses. The diagnostic reasoning skills needed for clinical reasoning in the advanced practice role are emphasized. Includes a 60 hour clinical component to continue to develop and refine comprehensive health assessment skills.

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nur6141

Principles of evidence – based nursing education for pre-licensure nursing students are the focus of this course. Classroom and clinical teaching is emphasized. Evaluation of student learning outcomes is included.

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nur6142

Fiscal management, strategic planning, trend analysis, and resource management are the focus of this course. Elements and processes of outcome measurements are explored. Leadership and management of personnel are included topics.

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nur6143

This course focuses on the knowledge and tools to support, promote, and implement change leading to improvements in patient and health system outcomes. Students will be introduced to concepts and theories of quality measurement and best practices including application to Deming’s Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) method of continuous quality improvement.

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nur6042

Health assessment of individuals and families are explored from the perspective of client-centered care, safety, cultural diversity, genomics, and biopsychosocial principles. Laboratory practice is required.

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nur6140

This course provides an overview of nursing informatics and electronic modalities that assist in patient and client management. The automation of data management through information systems, expert systems, and telecommunications will be examined in the context of health care informatics. The use of technology to help make decisions and to improve the health status of the individual, family, and community will be emphasized. Legal and ethical implications of informatics and technology in healthcare are addressed. RN to BSN and MSN Students Only

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nur6041

Pharmacological management of adult onset acute and chronic illness is the focus of this course. Principles of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenomics will be examined. Cultural beliefs and practices for adult onset illnesses related to medication management are analyzed.

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nur5300

This course explores essential collaboration and communication skills for healthcare providers. Interprofessional collaboration and its significance in safe patient centered care is a focus of this course. Students will review the Interprofessional competencies and discuss the role of the nurse in improving Interprofessional collaboration in the healthcare setting. Professional written and oral communication as key to leading and managing safe patient care will also be addressed.

Objectives:

  1. Describe the culture, value, roles, responsibilities and expertise of other health professions.
  2. Understand how professional roles and responsibilities complement each other in the provision of safe patient centered care.
  3. Explain the roles and responsibilities of other care providers and how the team works together to provide care.
  4. Discuss the role of the nurse in various Interprofessional healthcare teams.
  5. Describe the management of ethical dilemmas specific to Interprofessional patient/population centered care situations.
  6. Demonstrate the various types of writing demanded in nursing education and in professional nursing practice.
  7. Demonstrate the ability to effectively utilize technology for Interprofessional research with a variety of resources.
  8. Demonstrate competence with communication tools and techniques including information systems and communication technologies to facilitate discussions and interactions that enhance team functioning.
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nur5412

This course explores essential writing skills for professional nurses. Grant application and papers for submission as publications are the focus of this course. Components of the course include: clear exposition, persuasive argument, effective synthesis and mastery of writing mechanics including APA format.

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nur6040

Principles of pathophysiology including biopsychosocial science and genomics are the focus of this course. Nursing’s role in management of chronic and acute adult onset illnesses is examined.

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nur5143

This course examines cultural safety, cultural tolerance, and cultural diversity related to population-focused nursing through the study of healthy ethnic communities and diverse socio-cultural groups. Travel to Toronto, Ontario, Canada for an accelerated cultural experience is required. This course is offered in the first summer session. This course requires additional course fees TBA prior to registration depending on current cost of travel, room and board.

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nur5140

The aim of this course is to prepare nurse educators to evaluate student progress in achieving course objectives. Course content includes evaluation of learning in the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains. Construction of test items based on course blueprints, use of rubrics, and clinical evaluation are included topics. Objective evaluation and student feedback are discussed as critical legal and ethical standards for nurse educators.

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nur5141

This course explores the integral approach of Holistic Nursing as an art and a science in concert with contemporary nursing by examining the Core Values of Holistic Nursing and Holistic Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice. The focus is on the role of the nurse as an instrument of healing the whole person, mind, body, spirit and emotions while honoring the interconnectedness and the interrelatedness of the nurse, client, society, and universal environment. Holistic nursing is based on a foundation of self-care, healing relationships, mutuality and presence. Caring healing interventions will be introduced and considered for integration into relationship-centered clinical practice and self-care to restore balance and enhance well-being.

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nur5041

Evidenced based practice and clinical reasoning are explored. Problem identification, problem solving, ethical standards and principles of research are the focus of a research proposal. Dissemination of research and translational research are analyzed for interdisciplinary practice.

Objectives:

  1. Analyze the influence of research on evidenced based
  2. Describe the development of nursing
  3. Critique current research reports and their significance for research
  4. Define the concepts of the qualitative and the quantitative research
  5. Evaluate research related to legal and ethical
  6. Develop research proposals from clinical
  7. Design strategies to integrate research findings into professional
  8. Evaluate scientific evidence and other data and available interdisciplinary resources as a basis for clinical decision-making.
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nur5042

Quality improvement, standards of care, health care policy, and organizational science, are topics of this course. Information technology and trends of healthcare are examined. Legal and economic challenges of advanced practice nursing are incorporated.

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nur5040

Nursing knowledge development, worldview, and competencies of the advanced practice nurse are examined. The focus of this course is professional practice development, communication, leadership, team building and interdisciplinary collaboration.
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nur4941

Focus on the leadership process and development of the leadership role of the professional nurse. Students apply the nursing process in primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention. Students analyze leadership and management functions, characteristics, styles, and roles. Interpersonal communication, staff development, change theory, and assertiveness skills are applied.

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nur4999

This course provides the student the opportunity to synthesize previous knowledge and skills in a supervised practicum experience with the guidance and approval of the faculty. The final project will integrate the academic and practical knowledge the students have acquired in their program. The clinical project provides students with the opportunity to explore a problem or issue of particular personal or professional interest that is related to one of the following nursing competencies: patient-centered care, teamwork/collaboration, Evidence based practice, quality improvement, safety or informatics (QSEN: http://www.qsen.org).  This final project will require the demonstration of the ability to think critically and creatively, to solve practical problems related to nursing practice or the facilitation of patient-centered care, to make reasoned and ethical decisions, and to communicate effectively orally and in writing.

  1. Analyze selected healthcare issues impacting the healthcare delivery system and professional nursing practice.
  2. Identify and analyze a need for nursing intervention or education within a healthcare setting in order to recommend appropriate action.
  3. Synthesize peer reviewed literature in order to use the information in a clinical agency to enhance nursing practice and patient centered outcomes.
  4. Evaluate and implement the appropriate communication format for the target audience in order to effect change.
  5. Collaborate with the inter/intra interdisciplinary team to optimize patient outcomes
  6. Demonstrate professional values based on moral, ethical, and legal aspects of nursing practice.
  7. Demonstrate awareness of environment and context of practice in the design and implementation of the practicum project.
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nur4600

Synthesis of theories and concepts related to critical thinking, clinical judgment or reasoning change theory, conflict Resolution, delegation, and changes that impact the healthcare delivery system is discussed. Theories and concepts related to leadership and management are presented. The aspects of the role of the nurse as leader and manager are explored in depth, with a special emphasis on the role of the nurse as change agent. The course will provide practical information for the practicing nurse to strengthen problem solving, decision- making, and critical thinking abilities, which are all vital in today’s rapidly changing healthcare delivery systems.

  1. Differentiate between the core concepts of leadership and management.
  2. Apply skills essential for managing resources in a healthcare setting.
  3. Apply skills essential for identifying, planning, implementing, and evaluating change.
  4. Examine the effect that leadership and management has on the assurance of quality and safety in healthcare.
  5. Integrate theory and research knowledge in the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of nursing leadership/management actions.
  6. Analyze patient care technologies, information systems, and communication devices that support safe nursing practice.
  7. Integrate knowledge of the social/ political forces, economic resources, and regulatory processes that impact healthcare delivery.
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nur4940

Provides a framework for the student to assist individuals, families, and groups in adapting to complex stressors. Emphasis is placed on the development by the student of critical thinking and critical judgment while using the nursing process to assist clients to meet their biophysical and psychosocial needs. Health teaching activities and research findings are incorporated into nursing care.

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nur4540

Increases the student’s ability to synthesize the knowledge, skills, concepts, and theories essential for effective professional nursing practice. Students examine issues that affect clients and healthcare systems. Consideration is given to the impact of cultural, economic, ethical, legal, political, professional, and social issues upon nursing practice.

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nur4532

This course will assist the student in preparing for the Nurses (NCLEX-RN) Examination. The student will be required to complete content modules and attend computerized practice sessions in prepartion for a culminating computerized exit examination and success on the NCLEX-RN examination.

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nur4400

This course focuses on the development of nursing knowledge and the improvement of nursing practice through current relevant evidence. Research methods are examined and current issues are analyzed in relation to the implementation of evidence-based practice in selected settings. Content includes identification of clinical questions, analysis of evidence for potential solutions/innovations, planning and implementing practice changes, evaluating outcomes and identifying gaps in nursing knowledge.  Process for leading and managing practice changes through the use of evidence based research to promote effective or positive patient outcomes are explored.

  1. Summarize the history of nursing and evidence based practice
  2. Identify the basic elements of the research process and levels of research evidence
  3. Differentiate between qualitative, quantitative and outcomes research (1, 2, 3)
  4. Identify data collection methods and procedures for qualitative, quantitative and evidence based practice
  5. Analyze evidence for validity and reliability in application to practice
  6. Describe the nurse’s role in implementing and disseminating research and EBP
  7. Demonstrate quality improvement skills as they relate to patient centered outcomes in practice
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nur4351

Develops knowledge and skills in applying the nursing process with individuals and families experiencing stressors affecting psychosocial needs. Students expand previous knowledge of human behavior and interpersonal relationships. Behavior is viewed on a continuum from healthy, adaptive responses to unhealthy, maladaptive responses. Therapeutic use of self as a nursing approach is emphasized in providing care in day treatment and inpatient settings. Students investigate selected mental health issues and analyze professional roles within the context of primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention.

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nur4200

This course will examine the role of nursing in providing care to vulnerable populations within the community.  Theories of community health and nursing practice will be discussed as well as concepts of health promotion and preventative care for vulnerable individuals, families, groups and communities. Content focuses on risk reduction, health maintenance, and promotion of high level wellness to individuals, families, and groups of all ages throughout the health continuum.

 

  1. Describe concepts of public and community health nursing process within the context of systems theory.
  2. Demonstrate competence in principles of community and population based health assessment.
  3. Collaborate in the application of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention interventions to vulnerable individuals, families groups and communities.
  4. Analyze levels of prevention in relation to the prioritization of the health needs of Vulnerable Populations.
  5. Identify concepts of vulnerability and resilience from the standpoint of cultural factors that affect health status and healthcare with diverse populations.
  6. Analyze issues associated with age, ethnicity, cultural identity, and lower socioeconomic status that contribute to disparities healthcare delivery to vulnerable populations.
  7. Describe underlying physiological and psychological mechanisms that contribute to perceived health status, functional status, and quality of life in vulnerable populations.
  8. Discuss nursing interventions and interdisciplinary strategies to reduce disparities in healthcare delivery and promote healthy lifestyles for vulnerable populations.
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nur4250

This course introduces global healthcare systems and models and their influence on health disparities in the delivery of healthcare. Content provides a foundation to examine factors influencing the health of communities and populations locally, nationally and globally. Basic public health principles and sciences are used to identify factors that influence promote and maintain health of populations. The use of epidemiological data and knowledge of environmental health, social determinants of health, genetics/genomics, and the influence of culture on health behaviors will be discussed.

 

  1. Examine global health systems, service delivery, factors influencing care and policy decisions, health disparities, and evidence-based care at local, state, national, and global levels.
  2. Evaluate global health disparities from a social justice framework, including the impact of political, economic, and socio-cultural forces.
  3. Describe the impact of cultural, societal, legal, and political factors, and ethical considerations influencing healthcare policies, service delivery, economics and health disparities at local, state, national, and global levels.
  4. Identify and analyze the cultural and social determinants of disease in developing countries
  5. Examine roles of local, state, national, and global regulatory and accreditation agencies in providing quality healthcare.
  6. Apply evidence-based research findings to address health disparities.
  7. Demonstrate competence in using technological systems and appropriate software to access local, state, national, and global information about healthcare.
  8. Analyze organizational and political processes and grassroots legislative efforts to influence healthcare policy and advocate for diverse populations around the world.
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nur4340

Synthesizes nursing and public health principles as applied to assessing, promoting and preserving the health of populations. Assists students to conceptualize the complexities of community dynamics (cultural, economic, political, and social) as they impact on the health of the community. Students apply the nursing process in primary, secondary and tertiary levels of prevention.

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nur3940

Focuses on the role of the professional nurse in assisting the family and its individual members to adapt to stressors of the childbearing and childrearing phases of the life cycle. Students learn to apply the nursing process to meet the needs of families along the health-illness continuum. Clinical experiences include nursing care of the antepartal, intrapartal, and postpartal woman and her newborn, well and hospitalized children, and their families. Health teaching activities occur in various healthcare settings.

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nur3942

Analyzes the family system as it responds to stressors throughout the life cycle. A variety of approaches to family analysis are considered throughout the course. Students apply the nursing process in studying the roles, functions, values, and communication patterns within family. Teaching-learning principles are implemented in completing a health teaching project in the community. Students apply the nursing process in primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention.

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nur3740

Provides students with the opportunity to continue application of the nursing process. Emphasis is placed on assessment and diagnosis, expansion of planning and implementation, and begin-ning use of evaluation. In acute care settings, students provide health care to adults experiencing stressors affecting biophysical needs. Students apply the nursing process in primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention.

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nur3680

This course is designed to assist the students to acquire an understanding of the applications of statistical methods as a basis for identifying research problems, planning and implementing a research plan. The focus of the content is on the knowledge and skills to use, and interpret output from, statistical analysis techniques that are frequently encountered in the clinical literature of nursing, medicine, psychology and epidemiology, and other health related disciplines. Emphasis is placed on application and solid conceptual understanding of statistical inference with different study designs.

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nur3600

The legal and ethical aspects of the nurse’s role in leading and managing safe and effective patient-centered care are examined in this course The ethical responsibilities of the nurse as well as decision-making models related to healthcare situations will be discussed. The content focuses on the identification and analysis of legal and ethical concepts and principles underlying nursing practice and healthcare. Topics include an exploration of current ethical and legal issues that impact professional nursing and healthcare practice.

  1. Examine the major ethical theories and ethical principles influencing ethical decision-making.
  2. Explore contemporary moral, legal, and ethical concepts that affect the practice of nurses and other healthcare providers.
  3. Evaluate legal principles that must be considered when making healthcare decisions.
  4. Describe the application of the Code for Nurses and other professional guidelines to clinical practice.
  5. Describe an effective ethical decision-making framework that incorporates moral concepts, professional ethics, and law and respects diverse values and beliefs.
  6. Discuss the role of the nurse in enabling individuals and families to make quality-of-life and end-of-life decisions and achieve a peaceful death.
  7. Identify the ethical obligations of the nursing profession to vulnerable populations.
  8. Define ethical issues related to access to care, allocation of resources, and global inequity in healthcare.
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nur3650

Building on previous knowledge and skills applicable to the practice of professional nursing, this course enhances the transition of registered nurses to the baccalaureate prepared professional nurse role. Emphasis is on the challenging role of the nurse in today’s global healthcare system. Content focuses on the interrelated concepts of nursing theory, models of health and illness, evidence-based practice, critical thinking, and clinical judgment. Changes in the health care environment and the impact on the professional nurse’s role as part of the interprofessional healthcare team are discussed.

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nur2840

Introductory concepts of the art and science of professional nursing practice are presented and integrated into clinical practice. Gordon’s Functional Health Pattern is introduced as the fundamental assessment tool. Selected nursing skills and physical assessment are presented in lecture, practiced in the Nursing Learning Laboratory, and applied in providing care to adults in the clinical setting nursing practice focuses on all aspects of the nursing process, and utilizes the three levels of prevention (primary, secondary, and tertiary) to facilitate adaptive responses to stressors affecting physiological and safety needs.

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nur3540

Includes discussion of nursing theories and research methods. Emphasis is placed on critical analysis of published nursing research. Attention is paid to ethical issues and the contribution of research in developing nursing theory and improving nursing practice.

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nur2740

This course provides the student with a foundation for application of concepts of pharmacology in nursing practice. Drugs will be presented by classification, groups and prototypes. Principles of drug action, including pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, nursing considerations and client teaching for each prototype will be emphasized.

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nur2731

This course will examine the concept of human disease states and their clinical management from a nursing perspective. This course will help the pre-clinical nursing student apply knowledge of anatomy and physiology to the study of adaptive and maladaptive processes that lead to illness. Specific physiologic concepts will be discussed, including cellular adaption, inflammation, tissue oxygenation and perfusion, fluid and electrolyte balance and the body’s defense system. Alterations of the major body systems will be emphasized, including cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurologic, renal, hematological and endocrine systems.

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mus1040

A study of operas that contain elements of the supernatural based on great literature from Shakespeare, Goethe, and others. Otherworldliness is the uniting theme as witches, gods and goddesses, the theft of a person’s reflection; animals that speak and dragons that do magic connect musically. A course requirement is the participation of students on a class trip by bus to the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City. A program fee is charged.

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mus1050

A history of rock and roll, tracing its diverse American influences from the 19th Century Blues, 20th Century pop music and Rhythm and Blues to its emergence as a recognizable style in the 1950s. In addition to a study of its musical basis, there will also be an understanding of the relationship between the music and its symbiotic relationship with 20th Century history and society.

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nur2540

Introduces the components of the organizing framework of the nursing major. Various theories, e. g., health-illness continuum, Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, developmental, communication, and crisis, are presented and discussed as they relate to individual systems (client, family, community). Explores the history, definition, philosophy, and role of professional nursing. The role of the professional nurse is identified as keeping the client system stable by intervening at primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention levels. Environmental forces, e. g., socioeconomic and cultural, that impact on nursing practice are presented. Selected ethical and legal aspects of nursing practice are identified. The laboratory experience introduces computational concepts required for professional nursing practice. Concepts include (but are not limited to) systems conversion, ratio and proportion, dosage calculations, and intravenous calculations supported with a computerized assisted learning program.

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mus1010

A comprehensive overview of musical theater in America from its inception in the United States at the turn of the century, through the era of Rodgers and Hammer-stein, Sondheim, Andrew Lloyd Webber and the concept musical of today.

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mus1020

This course traces the course of jazz from the African’s musical heritage to the New World through work songs, spirituals, and blues; the birth of jazz in New Orleans and its dissemination to St. Louis, Chicago, Kansas City, and New York.

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mus1030

This course surveys and assesses our cultural heritage in the performing art of opera. Beginning with Mozart, the evolution of operatic expression is traced through examination of favorites in the Italian, French, and German traditions. A course requirement is the participation of students on a class trip by bus to the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City. A program fee is charged.

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mkt5480

This course will track the development of an integrated marketing strategy, from setting clear measurable goals, to defining benchmarks, implementation, and evaluating its success. Students will explore the unique attributes of a mission-based marketing strategy and the special demands created by marketing efforts that are not driven by profit. Special topics will include media relations, web presence and outline of a marketing plan.

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mus1000

The aim of this course is to increase the student’s understanding and enjoyment of music, and to strengthen one’s ability to benefit, as a listener, from music. The course will begin with the materials of music and introduce examples of music from the Baroque through the 20th century periods of music.

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mkt5210

This course investigates the process that organizations use to identify the needs of their customers and to create the products and services that meet these needs within the resource constraints and strategic objectives of the organization. The course examines market research, target market selection, market segmentation, position, and branding. It covers all the elements of the marketing mix, showing how they are being transformed by the Internet and the global economy.

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mkt4810

Crafting a winning superior strategy in the face of increasing global competition and turmoil in the business environment requires an approach that integrates and exploits organizational strengths to develop sustainable competitive advantage. Students will learn the process of developing marketing strategy as well as the latest developments in strategic thinking. The course will cover strategic marketing issues such as market segmentation and opportunity analysis, product and branding, pricing, marketing communications, distribution, marketing control and performance analysis. Students will explore these issues through case analyses, class and group projects, guest speakers, and by creating a comprehensive marketing plan.

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mkt4899

The student majoring in marketing will be provided an internship earning 3 to 6 credits. Students will be placed in marketing departments, providing an opportunity to relate classroom concepts to practical applications in the business world.

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mkt5000

This course is an analytical approach to the study of marketing, focusing on the total environment in which marketing decisions are made. Emphasis is on the managerial approach to product, price, promotion, and distribution decisions and the planning, research, and organizational aspects of marketing decision making. Buyer behavior is studied and considerable emphasis is placed upon demand analysis as a tool for marketing decisions. Examination of consumer and industrial products and services, profit, nonprofit, public, and private organizations and the social and legal implications of marketing policies are also investigated.

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mkt3691

STUDENTS MUST BE 21 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER. Students will be introduced to the major wine producing regions of the world and what consumers need to know to fully enjoy and appreciate wines.

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mkt4694

Selected readings are chosen in accordance with the student’s interest, as directed and approved by the instructor.

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mkt3620

Social media has changed the much of the playing field in marketing and advertising. Through social media, customers now have access to the vast experiences of other customers to guide their purchase behavior. Conversation and participation are the norms in social media and social communities. Marketers now must embrace this new relationship with customers to be successful. In this course, students will learn about the different types of social media, create social media marketing strategy, and create content and engagement strategies for various social media and sites platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, blogs, and YouTube.

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mkt3600

The ability to secure and utilize market information is critical to successful decision making in business. The purpose of marketing research is to help managers make better and more profitable decisions by providing meaningful and cost-justified information. Students will learn about the role of marketing research in decision making and how firms practice marketing research by conducting their own research in group and class project(s) for real decision makers. Topics include problem definition, selecting and using secondary data, research design, qualitative research, designing surveys, sampling techniques, scaling and measurement issues, and research validity.

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mkt3610

Successful organizations and marketers must be able to craft strategies that achieve the desired marketing objectives. Students will have the chance to develop and implement their own marketing strategies in a real-time decision-making environment by competing against other students in a simulated consumer marketplace. Through this course, students will learn about conducting SWOT analyses, creating competitive advantages, collecting and leveraging market information, allocating resources across businesses and brands, market forecasting, market segmentation, and how to develop product, pricing, promotion, distribution, and research and development strategies.

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mkt3510

An overview of the entrepreneurship process starting with the individual, the creativity process, the entrepreneurial idea/concept, and feasibility analysis, and concluding with the business plan. Field trip(s) and guest speakers (e. g., alumni and faculty) appropriate to venture startup and infancy are incorporated. Topics include forms of business organization, patent/copyright laws, management, finance, store layout, employee theft, and franchising.

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mkt3520

Students develop a knowledge base, skill base and overall ability in the public relations domain. Course will examine strategic perspectives, evolution of public relations, measuring the success rate, and current issues and crisis management of organizations.

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mkt3550

Your startup/inheritance/acquisition has grown and faces a new set of opportunities, problems and risks. Topics include foundations for long-term success, strategic planning, business development, sustainable growth, and control systems in venture-specific, critical areas. Field trips and guest speakers from growing ventures are planned.

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mkt3500

Emphasis is placed on practical use of advertising in the operation of the ordinary business, including the study of the various media available and their use. Sufficient time is spent on the role of advertising in the marketing mix and its effects upon our economy. Included is the study of the fundamentals of advertising creation: research, appeals, copy, illustration, layout, and reproduction. A study of the advertising agency includes analyses of current advertising campaigns and types of media chosen for such campaigns.

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mkt3410

This is an advanced course dedicated to the study of pertinent issues in international sales and marketing. The purpose is to understand the international strategy development and execution process as it affects both consumer and industrial product companies interested in global sales. Selected case studies will be reviewed.

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mkt3420

This is an introductory course that surveys the hospitality and service industries. The dynamic and applications of marketing strategies are studied with relation to these industries. Case studies provide an understanding of the unique problems associated with decision making.

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mkt2710

This course introduces a model of the IMC (integrated marketing communications) planning process and the steps taken in developing a marketing communications program. Research-based examinations of organizations needs for programs that can meet the global challenges and their impact. Promotions Management, Communication Process, and Ethical Issues will be discussed.

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mkt3210

This course acquaints students with the sports marketing field, with emphasis on marketing mix and basic marketing functions as they apply to the sports industry. Specific strategies in sports promotion, sporting goods, and health and fitness markets are explored.

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mkt3400

Professional sales is the primary personal communication tool used by businesses to find, create, and retain customers. Firms and individuals with superior sales skills will have a competitive advantage in the marketplace. The goal of this course is to expose students to the current state-of-the-art sales methods and skills used in business today. Students will learn through active participation and will receive the same type of professional sales training found in top corporations. Topics and methods include need-satisfaction selling, partnering skills, prospecting, SPIN questioning, handling objections, and closing.

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mkt2700

Branding is endowing products and services with the power of a brand. Students will learn how to position brands and to create differences in the marketplace. Analysis of the market, competition, technology, and cultural changes are fully examined.

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mkt2600

A thorough understanding of consumer behavior is the bedrock of any successful marketing strategy. Some of the topics to be covered with respect to their effect on consumer behavior include consumer decision-making; attitudes and purchase intentions; cognition and emotion; cultural and social factors; learning theories; attention and perception of marketing stimuli; and involvement. Theories and concepts will be drawn from marketing, psychology, communication, and sociology.

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mkt2610

Store organization, operation, and control, including location, equipment, layout, buying, markup, and merchandising techniques are examined. Minor emphasis will be placed on management problems in areas of pricing, selling and promotion, personnel, credit, and inventory control. Integrated distribution strategies, the internet and social media will be examined.

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mis3340

This course will emphasize the concepts and structures necessary to design and implement a database application through such database concepts as object-oriented modeling and entity-relationship diagrams. Review of logical vs. physical data organization is also included. A comparison of database models and definitions will round out the course.

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mis3350

Types of controls are identified and their effectiveness is evaluated. Emphasis is on the prevention and detection of both intentional and unintentional computer abuse. Existing and proposed legislation in this area will be discussed.

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mkt1450

Marketing is a key activity that enables businesses and organizations to achieve their goals by satisfying the needs of others through mutually beneficial relationships. This course will provide students with an understanding of important marketing theory and practices, including: the marketing concept; the marketing environment; market segmentation, product positioning; product and brand strategies; pricing strategies, marketing communication strategies; distribution strategies; consumer and business buying behavior; and electronic marketing.

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mis3200

This course presents a formal approach to state-of-the-art techniques in the analysis and design of computer-based business information systems. Through the use of group projects, the process of system selection, feasibility study, and system design are covered in depth. A comparison and evaluation of file and data base requirements will be included. Students will be required to use project planning during the implementation of the project.

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mis3300

This course will introduce the complex technology surrounding data communication networks. Numerous case studies will be reviewed to show how data communication technology supports modern data processing. The student will be required to design a data communication system by selecting appropriate communication lines, equipment, and software.

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mis2800

This course introduces the student to a versatile and powerful system programming language (currently “C”). Emphasis will be on flow control, data structures, and abstraction. In addition, the student will become familiar with the UNIX operating system, its functions, and the interface between the operating system and the system programming language.

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mis2700

An introduction to computer organization, architecture and programming at the assembly language level. Topics include: mnemonic operations, addressing, memory organizations, data representation, interconnection structures, i/o and operating system fundamentals. Emphasis will be on the major components of a computer system, the necessary control mechanisms and explaining the various phases necessary for converting a source program into a form that can be executed by the machine.

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mis2720

This course presents a formal state-of-the-art approach to application systems design and development. It is designed to reinforce the students’ existing knowledge of structured programming in COBOL by exposure to advanced table handling techniques and file maintenance through batch and online transaction/file processing. Optimization and efficiency of code and logic design will be emphasized. Interactive programming and a project-oriented environment will be utilized. Lab fee.

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mis2200

Topics include the concepts of hardware and software; the use of software engineering concepts of data and procedure abstraction; introduction to operating systems and utilities; and mastering a high-level computer language (currently Java Script). Lab fee.

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mis2210

This course will introduce students to object-oriented programming (OOP). Students will understand how object-oriented languages can reduce programming and maintenance time by providing a means of encapsulating behavior and ensuring data abstraction. Comprehension will be enforced by numerous programming assignments.

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mis2520

This course acquaints students with top-down techniques with structured modular programming using the COBOL programming language, as well as the structure of data files and their efficient access. Topics include effective data manipulation, report generation, sequential file processing, and table handling to satisfy business information needs. Lab fee.

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mis1210

This meets the requirement as a writing intensive course in the major. This course provides an introduction to information systems from a business point of view. Subjects to be covered include: terminology, a survey of hardware and software, introduction to systems analysis and design, as well as an overview of the college’s computer facilities.

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mis1220

This course is a survey of microcomputers as used in today’s environment. The student will become familiar with current trends and uses of microcomputers as well as hands-on exposure to spreadsheets, databases, word processors, and operating systems. Students will be required to develop applications in each of the software areas.

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mgt6999

This course examines the process of entrepreneurship from the conception of a new idea through the steps of research and market testing to the crafting of a complete business plan. It focuses on the many ways that entrepreneurs create value and the central role of new venture creation in a free market economy. In this capstone course for the MBA program, students are asked to apply their knowledge. The capstone course for the MBA asks students to apply their knowledge of each business area to putting together and presenting, in the most persuasive but honest manner, an integrated plan for a new venture. For those students who prefer to relate the course to their current workplace, they have the option of preparing an in-depth study of a proposed solution to an existing problem.

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mgt5480

This course examines processes and techniques employed in the management of hotel operations including housekeeping, front office management, rebranding, franchising, and facilities management. Additional emphasis is placed on the examination of the restaurant and beverage operations including multi-units operations, restaurant and bar layout, trend identification and product selection, basic production methods, costing and pricing, inventory methods and human resources management. The creation of wine lists, beer lists and cocktail menus is also discussed.

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mgt5544

This course introduces the techniques used to plan, manage, and complete projects. It distinguishes project management from general management and examines the principal concepts and methods that have been developed to manage projects successfully: defining project objectives; the Critical Path Method; application of Lean/Six Sigma and other quality techniques; team building and conflict resolution; allocation of resources – human, physical, and financial; uses of probability to assess project time lines; and project control through budgeting. The course also covers the general principles of Management Science and Systems Theory – giving students an understanding of how models can be used to improve the quality of management decision making.

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mgt6410

This course studies management as an organized body of knowledge, focusing on the role of leadership and teamwork in building organizational effectiveness. Concepts include: the nature and purpose of organizations; strategic planning; humanistic, ethical and behaviorist challenges facing modern institutions in a rapidly changing global environment; the development of leadership and teamwork skills; management dynamics of national and international companies; and the importance of CSR. The course also addresses the application of total quality methods and control systems to assure effective implementation of business plans.

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mgt5360

This course examines the history and development of the gaming and casino operations including the examination of the processes and techniques employed in the management of casino operations including table games, slots and internet gaming. Comparisons, case studies and selected topics focus on organization and department policies, production processes, manpower development, scheduling and current trends in the casino and gaming industry.

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mgt5450

Topics covered in this course include development and function of common law; policy considerations; judicial procedure; survey of criminal law, torts, and contracts; Uniform Commercial Code as it relates to sales, commercial paper, and secured transactions; survey of agency; the formation, management, and financing of partnerships, corporations, and other business entities. Special emphasis is placed on review of laws and regulations pertaining to the formation and ongoing operations of casinos and the hospitality industry that have significant impacts on capital expenditures and operating strategies.

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mgt5460

This course examines the scope of the convention industry and provides the essential skills required to plan, manage and expedite successful events. Emphasis is placed on project scheduling and planning including inception, marketing, site selection, contract negotiations, selecting suppliers, obtaining sponsorships and budgeting.

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mgt5290

This course introduces the techniques used to plan, manage, and complete projects. It examines the principal concepts and methods that have been developed to manage projects successfully: defining project objectives; the Critical Path Method; application of Lean/Six Sigma and other quality techniques; allocation of resources human, physical, and financial; and project control through budgeting. This course also includes an overview of financial modeling and the use analytical tools including one- and two- variable data tables, Goal Seek, Scenario Manager, Databases, Pivot Tables, Solver, and Chart development.

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mgt5320

This course studies financial reporting and analysis as it pertains to the needs of management; principally planning, controlling and decision making. Special emphasis is placed in covering casino security, financial internal control systems and risk analysis and making effective strategic decisions regarding loss prevention.

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mgt5285

This course will provide students with the methodologies and skills sets required to develop and implement both personal and professional career development plans. Topics include personal skills inventory assessment tools, resume writing, videotaped practice interviewing, career search strategies, interview preparation, individual marketing communications, and salary negotiation. Additional topics include personal time management and organizational skills.

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mgt5250

Topics include executive decision making in dealing with formal employee-employer relationships; human resources development; line and staff relationships; job description and analysis; recruitment training and performance appraisal; collective bargaining process; labor-management relations; and wage and salary policies and administration.

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mgt5270

This course defines the information management needs of an organization in the knowledge economy. It also looks at information technology – both hardware and software – from the perspective of the manager and the customer and the key role that digitization and the Internet play in developing and implementing any successful business strategy. Special topics include: computer security, privacy, enterprise systems, e-commerce, and supply chain management.

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mgt5280

This course provides the opportunity for students to develop professional written, oral and presentation competencies required in both the MBA degree program and professional workplace. Students will learn how to write effective case studies and graduate-level research papers using available institutional research tools, research methodologies and critical thinking skills. Students will be introduced to strategies for employing structure, style and format resulting in impactful and effective written business reports and electronic communications. This course will also provide students with strategies and tools to generate well organized, persuasive and effective presentations.

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mgt5230

This course covers the elements of statistics and management science. It deals with the principle methods that business researchers use to analyze and understand data-central tendency, variation, probability, hypothesis testing and forecasting. It also deals with management science models and techniques for optimization, network design for project management, queuing, managing risk and uncertainty. The emphasis is on providing students with the practical skills and techniques that can be applied to improve the effectiveness of managerial decision making.

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mgt5240

This course shall enable the student to learn and understand the importance of operations management, both for service and production processes. The student will gain an appreciation of the scorecard of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for the business to build sustainable competitive advantages. Lectures include discussion of strategy, process, supply chain design and planning and controlling the supply chain. Emphasis is placed on current trends in operations – especially quality, technology and inventory management.

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mgt4899

This program will provide business majors with the opportunity to gain practical experience in the operations of business or government. The student will participate in managerial activities under the supervision of experienced executive and managerial personnel. Upon completion of the program, students must participate in a terminating seminar and submit a written report. An evaluation of the student’s effort will be obtained from the supervisor in the organization where he or she interned.

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mgt5000

This course offers study and practice in the principles, skills, and tools of management, including planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, and controlling activities of the administrative unit. The human and technical sides of work are fitted together in developing an understanding of the managers job of selecting, training, leading, motivating, evaluating, delegating, and introducing change.

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mgt5210

This course provides a systematic analysis of the strategic and human functions of a business enterprise. The responsibilities of manager for anticipating changes in the business environment, for cautiously adapting goals and policies to environmental opportunities, constraints and adverse pressures, and the search for new combinations of activities that will have favorable results for the organization and the economy will be examined.

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mgt4800

This meets the requirement as a writing intensive course in the major. This seminar is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply the wide array of knowledge gained through his/her academic program to various real world situations. The student’s knowledge application will be assessed through the analysis of complex business case problems.

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mgt4694

Selected readings are chosen in accordance with the student’s interests and background.

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mgt4000

This course conducts an investigation of critical, current issues affecting the management and operation of business enterprises in today’s environment.

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mgt3290

This course will explore the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and its evolution in the corporate sector beginning in the late 1800’s. Students will gain an understanding of the four components of corporate social responsibility: economic, legal, ethical, and philanthropic, and the difficult balancing act faced by firms who need to focus on profitability while being responsive to stakeholders and society.

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mgt3661

This course introduces the techniques used to plan, manage, and complete projects in accordance with guidelines to which all participants and beneficiaries have agreed. It distinguishes project management from general management and examines the principal concepts and methods that have been developed to manage projects successfully: defining project objectives; the Critical Path Method; application of Lean/Six Sigma and other quality techniques; team building and conflict resolution; allocation of resources – human, physical, and financial; uses of probability to assess project time lines (PERT); GANNT Charts; and project control through budgeting. Students will apply software to managing their own projects. The course also covers the general principles of Management Science and Systems Theory – giving students an understanding of how models can be used to improve the quality of management decision making. Classes will introduce students to these areas of project management. Students will then apply the techniques and concepts to running an actual project so that they master these important skills by using them.

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mgt3203

An overview of the entrepreneurship process starting with the individual, the creativity process, the entrepreneurial idea/concept, the feasibility analysis and concluding with the business plan. Field trip(s) and guest speakers (e. g., alumni and faculty) appropriate to venture startup and infancy are incorporated. Topics include selling, distributing, people management, cash management, time to market, time to volume, franchising, intellectual property, and dealing with risk/fear.

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mgt3210

This course introduces the student to the practice of economic reasoning in the solution of real-world managerial decision problems. In addition to developing the theoretical and analytical tools of economic decision making, this course enables students to develop judgment skills required in the application of managerial economics. Emphasis is placed on the use and application of economic analysis in clarifying problems, organizing and evaluating information, and in comparing alternative courses of action.

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mgt3213

This course examines the problems of personnel relationships in business and industry. Primary emphasis is placed upon the psychological factors in human relations; the purpose, organization, and functions of the personnel department; instruments of personnel control, such as interviewing, testing, the making of job analysis, classification, personnel education and training, employee incentives, retention, and similar related topics.

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mgt3200

This course provides a broad investigation of labor-management relations. It encompasses the historical development of the labor movement, the legal environment, and the nature of labor-management relationship. Current case decisions and role-playing exercises will be utilized to illustrate the process of contract negotiations and contract administration.

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mgt3201

Current issues of ethics in society as they affect business behavior will be discussed. Topics include the social responsibilities of business, environmental issues, human rights and technological progress, business ethics, and an analysis of global societal values.

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mgt3202

Leadership involves change and facing up to difficult decisions and situations. The intent of this course is to give a practical understanding of leadership, its demands, its wide variety of effective styles, and both its positive and negative impacts on organization.

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mgt2400

This course provides a conceptual framework for understanding and studying the dynamics of behavior in organizational settings and for applying these concepts to improving organizational effectiveness. Included are personality, organizational theory and structure, the decision process, the communication process, group dynamics and leadership, and conflict resolution.

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mgt1400

This course offers an introduction to the principles of management and their application to business. The basic management concepts of planning, organizing, controlling, motivating, communicating, staffing, and leading provide the basis for understanding of the management profession and a basis upon which higher level management courses can build more specialized knowledge.

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mgt2000

This course will address environmental issues from management perspective by focusing on how such issues potentially impact on the corporation and how the organization should proactively deal with them. Major topics include: laws and regulations, “green” business strategies, benefit-cost analysis, organizational design and the “triple bottom line” and competitive and international issues.

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mat5000

Topics include: descriptive statistics theory and application of univariate frequency distributions; measures of central tendency, dispersion, skewness and kurtosis; probability theory and theoretical probability; density functions; sampling theory; sampling distributions; confidence interval estimates; tests of statistical significance and hypothesis testing, as related to statistical estimation and decision making; decision rules and their power curves; acceptance sampling; and quality control.

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mat3203

This course examines ordinary and partial differential equations, particularly of the first and second orders, including geometrical interpretations and applications.

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mat3601

This course covers an in-depth analysis of the fundamental properties of the real number system, including the completeness property, sequences, limits and continuity, differentiation through the Mean Value Theorem, and the Riemann integral.

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mat3801

This course includes the study of integers, equivalence relations, partitions, and groups. The material on groups includes subgroups, group homomorphisms and factor groups as well as the fundamental group homomorphism theorem.

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mat2601

This lab presents computer applications of the ideas and techniques discussed in MAT2600. CO-REQUISITES: MAT2600

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mat2816

This course includes the study of Gauss-Jordan elimination, matrices, determinants, real vector spaces, dot product, Gram Schmidt process, linear transformations, and eigenvalues. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of a graphing calculator.

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mat2870

This course covers set theory, logic, proofs, induction, recursion, relations, functions, combinatorics, algebraic structures, and graph theory.

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mat2500

This course includes the study of integration, applications of the definite integral, transcendental functions, and methods of integration. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of a graphing calculator.

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mat2501

This lab presents computer applications of the ideas and techniques discussed in MAT2500. CO-REQUISITES: MAT2500

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mat2600

This course includes the study of hyperbolic functions, polar coordinates, vectors and parametric equations, l’Hopital’s Rule, sequences, infinite series, limits, continuity, partial differentiation, optimization, and multiple integration for functions of several variables. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of a graphing calculator.

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mat2030

This course stresses the application of probability and statistics in business decision-making using cross sectional and historical data. The course begins with estimation and hypothesis testing for parameters of two populations. The Chi-square distribution is applied to contingency tables and the F distribution is applied to analysis of variance with emphasis on statistical decision-making models. Time series analysis, linear regression and correlation models are constructed and estimated. The traditional tests of statistical significance are applied, and the models are examined in light of the assumptions underlying the least-squares technique. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of computer software.

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mat2400

This course discusses limits, continuity, derivatives, maximum and minimum problems, related rates, and Mean Value Theorem. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of a graphing calculator and computer software.

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mat2004

This course presents the principles of statistics as applied to the analysis of biological and health data. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, non-parametric statistics, and regression analysis. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of computer software.

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mat1840

This course is an in-depth survey of algebraic and geometric problem solving techniques, including solutions of polynomial equations and inequalities, curve sketching techniques, and trigonometry from the triangular and functional standpoint. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of both a graphing calculator and computer software.

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mat1430

This course examines the various tools and techniques used in analyzing quantitative data; including descriptive statistics, probability and random variables, sampling design, theory of estimation and hypothesis testing for parameters of a single population, student ‘t’ and normal distributions. A year of high school algebra is recommended but not required. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of computer software.

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mat1630

This course presents a survey of college algebra to include sets, field properties, solution of equations and inequalities, functions, graphing, the factor theorem, analytic geometry, and exponential and logarithmic functions. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of a graphing calculator.

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mat1260

This course examines sets, counting techniques, probability, decision theory, statistics, and Math of Finance.

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mat1300

This course covers the structure of arithmetic from the number line through operations on signed numbers, the language of algebra from evaluating expressions through solving linear equations, and an introduction to polynomials, which includes factoring. The solution of literal problems will play a major role in the course. This course prepares the student for entry into MAT1630.

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mat1310

This course presents the principles of statistics that are applied to the analysis of data pertinent to the field of occupational therapy. Topics include descriptive and inferential statistics, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, estimation, analysis of variance, non-parametric statistics, and linear regression analysis. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of computer software.

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mat1201

This course presents selected fundamental elementary concepts in the areas of 1) Patterns, relations and algebra, 2) Geometry and 3) Measurement. Open only to those students seeking license in Elementary and Moderate Disabilities.

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mat1250

This course presents numbers, linear equations, linear inequalities, matrix algebra with applications, linear programming, and the simplex method. The course is designed for business administration majors.

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mat1051

This course is a comprehensive study of mathematical skills which will provide a strong mathematical foundation to pursue mathematics. This course is designed to provide algebraic skills needed for the study of finite mathematics. Topics include principles and applications of equations, formulas, problem solving, inequalities, systems of equations, graphing, and the utilization of technology. Upon completion, students should be able to perform basic computations and solve relevant, multi-step mathematical problems using technology where appropriate. This course is designed to prepare students for college level mathematics and give them the confidence to pursue mathematics at a higher level.

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mat1052

This is an introduction to basic and conceptual statistics for students from all disciplines. It emphasizes the development of statistical literacy. Topics include principles and applications of statistics, order of operations, evaluating formulas, problem solving, basic probability, logic, probability distributions, concepts and data analysis, and tables and graphs. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret data, statistical concepts, and statistical calculations. This course is designed to prepare students for more advanced statistics, and give them the confidence to pursue statistics at a higher level.

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mat1200

This course presents fundamental concepts about the numeration system (decimals, fractions) including meanings, applications and operations. In addition, the fundamentals of Number Theory are presented. A major goal is to understand the concepts well enough to explain the ideas in a fundamental way making use of concrete examples. Open only to elementary education majors.

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ldr6460

Synthesizing the knowledge gained in previous coursework, this course challenges students to develop their strategic thinking about leadership theory and concepts and the application of these at the individual, group and organizational levels. Current approaches to the strategic planning process are explored, taking into consideration cultural, ethical, and financial components. The focus of this course is putting into practice a comprehensive approach to leadership on a broad scale; an ability to set the vision and mission of an organization, motivate employees, make effective decisions, and utilizing concepts of entrepreneurship, lead an organization to success.

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ldr6959

In this course students explore the theoretical and conceptual aspects of action research and develop an action research project with a focus on leadership. After gaining approvals, the students design and carry out an action research project that includes exploration of related empirical studies, study design, data collection and analysis, and recommendations. This culminating project is based on leadership constructs learned throughout the program.

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ldr6440

As change is inevitable, organizational leaders need to be responsive to a variety of internal and external shifts. Organizations are most effective when leaders learn to anticipate and plan for change, understand its value, and lead others through the process. This course is designed for students to learn the theories and models of effective change, including innovation, the impact on the organization, and communication strategies. Through the use of case studies, students develop the skills to successfully identify and apply these theories and concepts in the workplace.

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ldr6370

Today at the national and international level the Academy faces new challenges including tougher scrutiny from a variety of stakeholders, fewer government and private resources, and pressures from a global marketplace. New entrepreneurial ways to lead in higher education must be developed. Utilizing case study methodology, this course examines the national and global trends impacting higher education today and the creative and innovative leadership practices it will require for the next century.

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ldr6410

At the center of this course is the understanding of how to build and lead successful teams in order to enhance organizational performance. Group dynamic and team building concepts and models will be analyzed with an emphasis on integrating these paradigms into the workplace to overcome challenges and build cohesive, highly effective and productive teams. The focus of this course is on the role of the leader in developing and leading groups to successful outcomes.

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ldr6420

With a focus on understanding and applying concepts in human resource and financial management, this course will explore key leadership and management processes for organizational effectiveness. Laws, policies, and practices in both arenas will be surveyed within the context of effective leadership decision-making.

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ldr6310

For those who wish to pursue a career in higher education, this course covers a broad exposure to topics in student issues, higher education law, government policy, financial aid and funding, governance, and the accreditation process as viewed through the lens of leader. These topics will be covered within the context of the current landscape of higher education as well as contemporary and historical trends.

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ldr6330

The characteristics of today’s college students are explored within the historical and philosophical context of student development. Theories of student behavior are investigated as are rights, freedoms, and responsibilities of students in relation to the college. This course includes review of the various programs and services provided for students on college campuses and online. With retention as an outcome, attributes of successful students and services to retain them are investigated.

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ldr6350

This course explores leadership models within institutions of higher education, including the shared governance process. Students also investigate the type of decisions faced by university leaders on their campuses and how the actions they take impact their students and institution. Change management theory and innovation concepts are surveyed to understand their role in the decision-making processes on campuses today. Career paths for leaders in higher education are explored.

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ldr6125

In this course students are introduced to the basic concepts of ethics. Ethical frameworks, moral decision-making techniques, and major perspectives on ethical reasoning are examined. Students also explore the practical tools leaders need to help recognize and address challenging ethical decisions. Real world case studies provide an opportunity to apply the skills learned.

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ldr6150

Through readings, experiential activities, and case studies, the emphasis of this course is the understanding of how global cultural forces influence various aspects of the leadership phenomenon. Students identify and analyze culture’s effects on attitudes and behaviors, leadership styles, and decision-making processes. The topic of diversity is examined through multiple lenses including socio-economic status, ethnicity, gender, and age. The course explores practical skills for application in the workplace.

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ldr6200

The role of assessment and evaluation in developing and maintaining quality programs in an organization is covered from a leadership perspective. Students develop skills in research methodology including problem identification, information literacy, qualitative and quantitative research design, data collection and interpretation, and the reporting of results. The focus is on using data to assess programs, formulate recommendations, and make effective decisions for improving practice and policy. The proposal for the Action Research project will be developed in this course.

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ldr6115

This course provides a systematic analysis of the strategic and human functions of a business enterprise. The responsibilities of managers for anticipating changes in the business environment, for cautiously adapting goals and policies to environmental opportunities, constraints and adverse pressures, and the search for new combinations of activities that will have favorable results for the organization and the economy will be examined. Typically, successful leaders have a healthy understanding of who they are. This course explores the personal and professional development of effective leaders and focuses on each student’s enhancement of their own leadership potential. Through completion of a series of assessment instruments, students gain an understanding their personal and leadership skills and learn how to further develop these skills for maximum success. Topics include social and emotional intelligence, motivation theory, and acceptance of self and others. This course also covers the value of succession planning and talent development.

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law5904

This course examines the legal basis of public management by reviewing major principles of administrative law including the doctrine of legislative delegation, Administrative Procedures Act, administrative rulemaking and adjudication, transparency, and judicial review of regulation. Students will view case law, statutes and regulations, and proposed legislation to gain and understanding of their impact on public administration and public policy.

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ldr6020

This course examines leadership as a concept and process. Leadership theories and models are explored within historical context, including effective contemporary practices. Concepts such as motivation, power and influence, group dynamics, and situational forces are examined. The review of empirical research and contemporary resources provide a basis of knowledge for the exploration of leadership and followership.

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itl1201

This is a basic course designed for students who have had little or no experience with the Italian language. The course includes drill in pronunciation, elementary conversation, grammar and writing, and the use of a cultural approach text. This is a comprehensive language course: teaching the four skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

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law5202

Topics covered in this course include development and function of common law; policy considerations; judicial procedure; survey of criminal law, torts, and contracts; Uniform Commercial Code as it relates to sales, commercial paper, and secured transactions; survey of agency; the formation, management, and financing of partnerships, corporations, and other business entities.

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ins4899

This course allows international studies majors to deepen their understanding of international affairs by pursuing an internship with a governmental or non-governmental organization that works in an international field. They will be required to work a regular number of hours (usually 10) each week during the semester. Besides fulfilling the expectations of their on-site supervisors, they must also write regular reports for their faculty supervisor. This course is offered every semester. It also may be taken over the summer if the internship opportunity is located outside of the greater Springfield area. In this case, it is expected that the participant will work a full-time schedule covering at least several weeks for their sponsoring institution. Students may take it only once for academic credit.

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itl1000

This course will enable students to develop the basics of oral skills, the main goal being to become functional in the language. The course will include guided practice in conversation to enhance communicative competence, small group discussions in Italian on practical topics, and practice of colloquial and idiomatic speech patterns in Italian to emphasize correct pronunciation and intonation. Movies and other audiovisual material will be used to enrich the learning experience and acquaint students to aspects of Italian culture and society.

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ins4800

A reading and research seminar for international studies majors and minors on contemporary topics in world affairs that will help students make connections between the various disciplines in which they have completed course work for the program. Since the topics will change each time the course is offered, it is repeatable one time.

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ins4890

Intended for students who are spending a regular semester abroad; the details are to be approved by the advisor and the dean of the School of Arts, Education and Sciences. Any requirements within the major must be approved by the appropriate chair or dean; and requirements for general education must be approved by the dean of the School of Arts, Education and Sciences.

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ins2400

This course is intended for students of all majors who participate in AIC’s Model UN Club to represent AIC at collegiate-level Model United Nations conferences held each semester at various campuses throughout the country. Students will be required to attend all meetings of the Model UN Club that are called to prepare for a conference; to research the policies of their assigned country; to prepare a written position paper for their country covering the specific issues they will be debating at the conference; and to actively participate in a professional manner at the conference itself. Students will learn the parliamentary procedures used at conferences, including how to write a resolution, the current issues facing the United Nations, and how to conduct research on their country and its policies. New students will also be introduced to the United Nations and how it functions. This course can be repeated each semester that the AIC Model UN participates at a conference.

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ibs6110

This course is an introduction to the international business environment and how it affects multi-national corporations. Topics include investigation of marketing techniques and programs as developed and implemented on an international scale; evaluation of international marketing strategies, special goals and decision-making processes that are part of marketing internationally; examination of policies and strategies of international finance, analyzing those problems confronting multi-nationals; balance of payments, foreign exchange market and risk, cash flow operations, and evaluations of international economic problems and policies.

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ibs4890

This is an advanced course dedicated to giving detailed insight into specific topics, regions or countries. Examples of topics include: doing business in Asia, Europe, Latin America, Africa, or the Middle East; big emerging markets (BEM); impact of U. S. laws on international business.

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ibs4899

An essential part of the international management program, three-credit internships will be made available to qualifying students at domestic and international organizations, where students will have the opportunity to experience and practice international business management techniques covered in the curriculum. Each internship will be individually designed in collaboration with the participating organizations.

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ibs3820

This course is divided into two major topics. The first will address global logistics and supply-chain management. Areas of interest will include international transportation modes, inventory control, packaging, storage, special trade outsourcing, logistics security, internet utilization, and the environment. Emphasis will be placed on the future challenges in managing global logistics and the supply chain. The second will address the principles and concepts involved in negotiating internationally. Areas of interest will include the stages of negotiations, cultural differences, development of business negotiation plans, and contract writing based on negotiation results. The course will include a business negotiations simulation between an American company and a foreign company.

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ibs4430

This course provides an analysis of various models of international operations by focusing on the typical structures of doing business on a worldwide basis. Using the case study approach, students will look at the operational integration of various companies. Open to juniors and seniors.

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ibs4889

This is a senior-level international business capstone course. The course objective is to provide seniors with a comprehensive course to review their knowledge and understanding of international business theories, concepts, and principles, and their relationship to one another. The student will develop a system-level model of a U. S. manufacturing company entering the international marketplace with the goal of becoming a multinational enterprise. The company will identify a region of the world and a specific country within that region. The U. S. company will go through the various stages of market entry. Collaborative arrangements like joint venture, licensing, and foreign production can be employed in the model. The foreign production operation will be used to market to other countries within the region with the long-term objective of marketing globally. The model will be interactive with submodels, controlled scenarios, and computer simulations to create a real world international business environment.

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ibs3401

A study is made of the fundamental concepts of international law and diplomacy. Particular attention will be devoted to the significance and application of these concepts in international relations.

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ibs3410

The course will provide the student with an understanding of the pertinent issues in international marketing. The course will explain the international environment (cultural, political, and legal) and the influence it has on marketing goods and services in the global marketplace. The course will look at global marketing strategies; the need for creating global products to meet consumers’ tastes and preferences; pricing strategies for global marketing; global advertising and other promotional strategies; international distribution systems; and assessing global market opportunities. Course work will include special research projects and/or case studies for class presentation and discussion.

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ibs3620

The course provides a comprehensive overview of the principles, concepts, and practices involved in the management of the export/import operations of a multinational enterprise. The course will enable the student to develop an in-depth understanding of the mechanics involved in exporting/importing. The course will concentrate on export/import laws and documentation; international sale/purchase agreements; use of intermediaries; payment methods, financing options; and government export/import assistance. The course will include a class project to develop an export/import operating manual for a multinational enterprise. Open to juniors and seniors.

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ibs2650

The course provides an overview of international human resource management. The globalization of business is having a significant impact on human resource management. Decisions have to be made on how to staff international operations; where and how to recruit and select personnel; how to train employees for international assignments and evaluate their performance; what compensation to provide them; how to facilitate the return of international employees to their parent organization; and how to handle international labor relations. The course will include a class project to develop an international human resource operating manual for a multinational enterprise.

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ibs3400

The course provides an analysis of economic relationships among countries, including studies of the balance of payments, the international monetary system, governmental adjustment policies, the theory of international trade, and international financial markets. The course will look at international economics from both a micro-and macro-economic perspectives. The course includes research work into recent international monetary issues and trends.

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ibs1420

The course provides the student with an understanding of the many cultures that make up the world we now live in. Today’s world is a global world made up of people with diverse cultural backgrounds. It is important to recognize cultural sensitivities that exist in every society. Cross-cultural awareness and understanding are critical to meaningful relationships and for success in every walk of life. The course will look at culture, verbal and non-verbal communications, religion, and roles of women, and will include a survey of geographical regions such as North America, Latin America, Asia, Europe, Middle East, and Africa. Emphasis will be placed on the contemporary issues found in today’s international environment.

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ibs1400

The course will explain business and management concepts from an international perspective. It will focus on the social, cultural, political, legal, and economic environments that influence international business operations. The course will look at international trade theories, the evolution of regional economic integration arrangements, foreign direct investment, governmental intervention in international trade, and the importance of foreign currency exchange market. Course work will include special research projects and/or case studies for class presentation and discussion.

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hst4898

Students may pursue supervised reading and/or research in topics they find especially interesting, for one, two, or three credit hours. Advance arrangement and permission of the department chair required.

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hst4899

This course allows history majors to enhance their knowledge of historical research or of public history by designing their own internship at a local museum, archive, or similar institution. They will be required to work a regular number of hours (usually ten) each week during the semester. Besides fulfilling the expectations of their on-site supervisors, they must also write regular reports for their faculty supervisor. This course is offered every semester. It also may be taken over the summer if the internship opportunity is located outside of the greater Springfield area. In this case, it is expected that the participant will work a full-time schedule covering at least several weeks for their sponsoring institution. Students may take it only once for academic credit.

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hst4697

This course is the capstone experience for all history majors. They will select a topic in conjunction with the instructor and write a substantial paper on it based on independent research. It is offered every semester and may be taken either in the fall or spring of the senior year.

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hst3890

Designed as a reading seminar, participants will read some material in common at the beginning of the semester in order to provide a basic body of knowledge. The emphasis of the course will be independent readings on chosen topics within twentieth-century world history, to be reported on in open discussion with other participants throughout the semester. This course is repeatable for credit with an appropriate change of individual topics.

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hst3700

This course is a study of the evolution of American political thought from 1776 to the present day, with special reference to the liberal tradition. Among the figures surveyed are Hamilton, Madison, Calhoun, Sumner, Dewey, Santayana, Skinner, Marcuse, and others. This course is not open to freshmen.

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hst3660

This course surveys the ideas of leading political thinkers from ancient times to the Renaissance. Figures such as Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, St. Thomas, Ibu Khalduhn, and Machiavelli will be discussed.

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hst3500

A study of the historical role of the U. S. Supreme Court and its impact on American society, including an examination of issues of political theory and major court cases.

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hst3532

An analysis of the Holocaust, including examination of its causes and the conduct of it. Emphasis will be on the political, social, and moral issues involved in war and on the impact of the Holocaust on today’s Jewish experience worldwide.

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hst3651

An examination of the evolution of the United States from the late 19th century through the early 21st, this course explores significant social, economic, intellectual, and political developments during “the American Century” of global history.

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hst3470

Topics to be examined will include the origins of the Cold War, the post-World War Two economic boom, the liberal and radical movements of the Sixties, the Conservative revival of the Seventies and Eighties, the end of the Cold War, and the impact of globalization and terrorism. Emphasis will be placed on the experience of ordinary men and women and their contributions to the development of a democratic society. Course readings will consist of relevant primary sources and recent secondary scholarship.

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hst3480

Topics to be examined will include Progressivism, World War One, the Twenties, the Crash and Great Depression, New Deal and World War Two. Emphasis will be placed on the experience of ordinary men and women and their contributions to the development of a democratic society. Course readings will consist of relevant primary sources and recent secondary scholarship.

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hst3440

The course will examine the African American experience from 1400 to 1877. Topics will include African Slavery, the rise of the Transatlantic Slave Trade, Slavery and racism in Colonial America, the American Revolution and Slavery, Antebellum Slavery in the South, Abolitionist and Antislavery movements in the North, the Civil War & Emancipation, and Reconstruction. Emphasis will be placed on the African and African-American experience and the contributions of African-Americans to the growth of democracy. Readings will consist of the recent secondary scholarship and primary sources.

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hst3430

Topics to be examined will include slavery and racism, abolitionist and antislavery movements, Civil War and Reconstruction, Jim Crow, the Great Migration, the Depression and New Deal, World War Two and Cold War, Civil Rights and Black Power, and the impact of de-industrialization, unemployment and incarceration. Emphasis will be placed on the experience of African-Americans and their contributions to the development of a democratic society. Course readings will consist of relevant primary sources and recent secondary scholarship.

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hst3421

This course will introduce students to the theory, methodology and practice of oral history research. As the primary requirement for the course students will record an interview with a family or community member using a standard oral history questionnaire and then transcribe and analyze their interview. With the permission of the interviewee the recording and transcribed interview will be donated to an oral history archive to be housed in the college library.

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hst3415

An offering of topics that vary. Examples of past or anticipated future subjects include: Classical Mythology; Augustine to Chaucer; Medieval Literary Culture; Three Crowns: Dante, Bocaccio, and Petrarch; Women in Medieval and Renaissance Italy; The Scientific Revolution; The History of Italy.

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hst3411

A general survey of the practices and purposes of war through the ages. Special attention will be given to theories of aggression and to reasons for war. Tactics, strategy, and major battles of great military commanders will be covered.

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hst3413

This course will examine the nature and significance of the American radical tradition from the American Revolution to the present-day. Among the radical philosophies and movements to be covered will be the American Revolution; abolitism; utopian experiments; womens rights; the labor movement; populism; socialism and communism; civil rights; Black power; feminism; the New Left; environmentalism; the gay and lesbian movement; and the global justice movement. Examination of the American radical tradition suggests that radicalism has been a persistent and significant feature of American history.

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hst3403

A study of the cultural movement known as the Renaissance. Focus is on the Italian version of this movement; specific features to be examined include humanism, “new” scholarship, literature, and art. Though medieval in its origins, the Italian Renaissance marks the beginning of modernity; emphasis will be on its heritage today.

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hst3401

This course will examine the international history of the Cold War. Special emphasis will be placed not only on the rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union, but also on how the entire world between 1945 and 1991 was influenced by the competition between the different ideologies and socio-economic systems that those countries represented. It also will suggest how the Cold War has continued to influence our present era.

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hst3402

This course will focus on German history from the late nineteenth century to the present. Topics covered include the creation of a German nation state in the form of the Second Empire in 1870-71; politics and society in imperial Germany; the origins of the first world war and the collapse of the empire in 1918; Germany’s first experiment with democracy between 1918 and 1933; the rise of national socialism with its devastating consequences; the era of two German states after 1945, one on each side of the Cold War; and the unexpected peaceful reunification of 1989-90.

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hst3325

The First World War was arguably the most important event of the twentieth century. It had a profound impact on international relations, political ideas, the conduct of war, the global economy, Western society, and culture and the arts. It altered the map of both Europe and the Middle East and set the stage for another world war as well as for decolonization. We are still living with many of its legacies today. This discussion-based course will begin by reviewing the nineteenth century international system and discuss the reasons why the war broke out in August 1914. It will then examine the course of the war on all its fronts as well as its effects on the home fronts of the belligerent countries, including on the arts and literature. Finally, it will consider the Paris Peace Settlement of 1919 and war’s long term consequences, including its place in historical memory around the world.

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hst3327

The Second World War was the bloodiest conflict in recent history. It had a profound impact on our world. This discussion-based course will explore the international system in the 1920s and 1930s and the various factors that led to the outbreak of the conflict in Europe and Asia. It will then examine the course of the global war itself, including its impact on civilians. Finally, it will consider the consequences of the war and how it is remembered in various countries today.

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hst2631

This seminar will introduce students to the basic issues and methods involved in the academic discipline of history. It will require them to write a paper based on independent research on a topic related to the theme chosen by the instructor for the seminar.

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hst2690

A systematic examination of world history from the international rivalries leading to World War I through the early twenty-first century. Emphasis will be on the political, economic, and cultural evolution of global society and the forces that unify as well as fragment that society.

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hst3100

This course will examine immigration and ethnicity in American history and life. In order to do so we will examine successive waves of free and forced immigration from Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas, from the 1600s to the 2000s. Particular attention will be paid to the nature of the immigrant experience and the regulation of immigration.

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hst2500

This course examines the structure of both presidential and congressional elections and the resultant consequences of those structures. The historical development of elections is emphasized. A case study of either the presidential or congressional midterm election will be analyzed with special attention given to campaign strategies.

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hst2601

A study of medieval Europe. This course will focus on the institutional, intellectual, and cultural aspects of the period, especially as they became the foundation for the Western heritage of today’s world. Covering from late antiquity to the Italian Renaissance, the topics will include social and economic study as well.

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hst2610

This course will explore the topic of European integration from a variety of perspectives, including those of history, political science and sociology. The first half of the course will concentrate on the pre-history and history of the European communities leading to the creation of the European Union in November 1993. Then, it will look at the European Union’s institutions and how they function, the relationship between the member states and the EU, and special issues that face the EU today.

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hst1520

A survey of the evolution of the United States from the late 19th century to the early 21st, this course explores the significant social, economic, intellectual, and political developments during “the American Age” of global history, including state history of Massachusetts.

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hst2420

The powers, function, and inherent conflicts of the Congress and the presidency are examined with emphasis placed on the historical development of institutions.

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hst2440

A survey of major themes in the cultural history of the Ancient Mediterranean world, beginning with the near east and continuing through Greek and Roman civilization. These cultures were remarkable for the scope of their intellectual achievements, ambition and power. As a result, the study of classical civilization is the traditional basis of a liberal education, providing a vital understanding of the moral and intellectual roots of current ideas on morality, politics, language and literature. This course explores the history of the Mediterranean world from the time of Homer to the fall of the Roman Empire. Topics include: Greek and Roman mythology, the philosophy of Plato and Aristotle, Greek and Roman theater, Latin classics (Seneca, Cato, Caesar, Tacitus, Livy) and major styles of art and architecture.

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hst1500

A one-semester, sophomore-level survey of world history, comprehensive in both chronology and geography. Principal concepts in geography, political science, economics, and the history of science will be featured. Designed specifically for Massachusetts state teacher certification needs, this course will emphasize Western civilization, including United States history and Massachusetts state history.

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hst1510

A survey of the evolution of the United States from its colonial origins to the end of Reconstruction, this course explores the significant social, economic, intellectual, and political developments, including state history of Massachusetts.

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hst1430

This course will provide a survey of World History from the Fifteenth Century to the present. It will focus on the global contacts and connections created since Columbus’s voyage in 1492 as well as on important political, economic, social and cultural trends that have contributed to the creation of the modern world.

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hst1400

An introductory survey of the historical evolution of Western civilization from its ancient origins to AD 1500. This course introduces students to methods of and issues in historical investigation. Its comprehensive approach includes the study of social and economic elements, religion, philosophy, literature, art, politics, and institutional developments.

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hst1410

An introductory survey of the historical evolution of Western civilization from AD 1500 to the present. This course introduces students to methods of and issues in historical investigation. Its comprehensive approach includes the study of social and economic elements, religion, philosophy, literature, art, politics, and institutional developments.

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hst1420

This course will provide a survey of World History from the origins of humanity to the Fifteenth Century, just before the European “voyages of discovery” that brought the Americas and Pacific into contact with the rest of the world. It will focus on the development of major civilizations around the globe with a special interest in the political, economic, cultural and other ties between these civilizations.

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hrd2601

Advanced training in the basic interpersonal skills learned in HRD2000. Special emphasis will be given to the skills of problem definition, goal definition, decision making, program development, and program implementation, and application of these skills to personal, organizational, and community development. Recommended for any student who is interested in a human contact career.

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hrd3070

The seminar will survey the skills, models, and systems needed to maximize individual and organizational development. Discussions and presentations will include an introduction to productivity intervention designs and training as a major ingredient for managing human resources. Focus will be on functionally relating policy, management, supervision, and delivery to information resource development. Students will design a productivity system in their specialty area. Open to all juniors and seniors.

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hrd2210

The student experiences training in practical career development skills of expanding career options, gathering career information, values development, decision making, and planning for career achievement. This course studies the major theories of career development and examines current issues in the field of education and management. Recommended for students interested in personal career development, counseling, guidance, and personnel management.

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hon4899

The thesis represents the capstone for the Honors Program and will require each student to work in close conjunction with a faculty advisor to produce an independent work of scholarship in their discipline. Standards will vary from major to major, but students are expected to produce a substantial piece of written work or its equivalent.

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hrd2000

This course introduces students to a conceptual model and the skill techniques that characterize an effective interpersonal interaction. The course provides students with an understanding of the dimensions of individual and interpersonal functioning that contribute to constructive relationships at home, school, and work within the community. It involves brief supervised practice sessions of the research-tested interpersonal skills related to these dimensions. Students will be provided with assistance in understanding the application of the skills to the fulfillment of professional responsibilities in corrections, counseling, nursing, business, and management.

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hon2210

This seminar explores a special topic in the humanities and liberal arts. Subjects will vary each semester.

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hon2220

This seminar explores a special topic in the social sciences. Subjects will vary each semester.

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hon4601

Under supervision of a faculty advisor, students will devise a plan for an honors thesis and do exploratory research and reading for this purpose. The faculty advisor will specify the requirements for successfully completing the course, which may include producing a prospectus or outline for the thesis and an annotated bibliography of relevant scholarly works on the topic. Students will then write the actual thesis in HON4899, which is normally taken the following semester.

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hcm4240

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the financial structure, market forces, government policies and regulations, controls and techniques that apply to the healthcare sector of the economy. It examines the perspectives of multiple stakeholders – patients, physicians, hospitals, insurance companies, and government – in allocating costs and realizing profits from the delivery of healthcare. It also provides grounding in the financial tools and techniques of needed to analyze complex healthcare problems and recommend sound solutions that maximize benefits to all parties while minimizing costs.

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hcm4899

The purpose of the internship is to provide students with a real-world, management-related experience in the healthcare sector. Students participate in projects that have implications for organizational efficiency, cost-effective delivery of health services or improved healthcare system performance.

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hon1104

This course introduces participants to college life, to American International College, and to the Honors Program. Issues covered include the purpose of higher education, planning a course of study, the culture and history of AIC, how to make the most of one’s time at college, as well as special topics at the instructor’s discretion.

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hcm2620

This course provides insight into the rapidly growing area of healthcare marketing. Building on a basic foundation of marketing principles, it focuses its attention on marketing for healthcare providers, organizations, health-related products and medical devices.

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hcm3230

This course examines the ethical and legal framework of the healthcare system and the issues that healthcare managers must deal with in order to address effectively the concerns of stakeholders, comply with governmental regulations, and act in concert with the ethics of the medical professions. It includes analysis of the legal challenges of malpractice, patient confidentiality, and conformity to administrative guidelines. It also applies classical theories of ethical decision making – utilitarianism, deontology, social justice – to issues faced by those managing healthcare establishments such as patient rights, use of human subjects and tissues in medical research, end of life decisions, and protection of intellectual property.

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hcm3440

This course introduces the student to the technology, legislation, and industry practices of the ethical management of healthcare information(Healthcare Informatics). The student will be exposed to latest trends, technologies, and best practices in manageing healthcare information. The student will develop a fuctional understanding of HIPPA, information systems, data quality, informatic, and the value of medical databases. Legal and ethical issues related to health information technology and health information exchanges will be explored.

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gsc3699

This course provides the student with an opportunity to integrate the theory and practice of their human service field and gain first-hand experience in a human service setting. Students propose a project prior to the beginning of the class and discuss it at the first class. They will then meet every other week with the fieldwork instructor to discuss their experience and issues related to their project.

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hcm2200

This course provides an overview of the American healthcare system. Beginning with a historical look at healthcare in the United States, students will examine the important demographic, social, and economic issues that challenge the current healthcare delivery system, and will gain an understanding of the difficulty in meeting the needs of both providers and consumers in this nation’s quest for equal access to quality care.

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hcm2610

This course studies the management of healthcare organizations including hospitals, ambulatory and long-term care facilities. It focuses on their organizational structures and functions as it addresses key issues pertaining to the delivery of care, services offered and their value to the community they serve.

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gsc2620

This course provides students with a background in models and theories of human service development. The inter-relationship support for older people and their surrounding communities (local, state, and federal) are examined, with a special focus on specific systems and networks supporting the human development field in Massachusetts and Connecticut.

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gsc2640

This course covers legal and policy issues in areas that affect the elderly, particularly in the areas of housing, health care, taxes, and social security.

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gsc2650

This course will explore several major, current issues in gerontology. Students will examine various research methodologies in human development, learn how to conduct a formal literature search using the major sources for gerontology research papers, and be able to demonstrate the ability to research a current topic in gerontology.

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gsc2410

Life cycle studies have recently focused on the middle and older years of the life span. These studies have revealed that the declines in aging aren’t as universal, precipitous, nor inevitable as previously thought; indeed, each decade in middle years has its theme and task. It has also been found that many of the changes we associate with old age actually begin during earlier periods of life. The focus in this course is on the origin and nature of these individual changes and phases.

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gsc2420

The theoretical perspectives inherent in wellness models of aging will be examined. These perspectives include: theories of aging, models of intentional change, theories of adult learning, and theories of motivation and adaptation. In addition, students will explore several biomedical and psychosocial contributors to healthy aging.

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gsc2600

The process of aging will be studied from a physical point of view. Healthy vs. unhealthy lifestyles will be presented including issues in nutrition, substance use and abuse, sexuality, safety, stress, and mental health. Specific disabilities connected with the aging process will be covered.

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gsc2400

An overview course that provides an introduction to the field of adult development in the later years. Topics include the psychology of aging, images of aging in literature and the media, ethnicity and aging, relationships with family and friends, the workplace and community, and the self, throughout the maturation process. Guest speakers, multimedia materials, and simulation activities are used to discuss the issues and opportunities facing individuals as our population ages.

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gsc2403

This course will focus on the many different aspects of death and dying. Some of the topics include: grief and bereavement, the hospice philosophy, children and death and dying, and AIDS. This course is appropriate for psychology and sociology majors, nurses and nursing students, gerontology students, and anyone interested in exploring this most fascinating subject.

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gsc1300

An examination of the kinds of crises experienced by older adults, suicidality in the older population, and interventions for the helping professional.

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gsc1220

The unique issues and needs of older adults living with HIV/AIDS and other older persons who are directly affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic, including cultural factors, health/medical complications, risk factors, education, and service provision.

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gsc1230

This class addresses how public policies and laws are made, the role of influential groups and how money given to candidates influences policies affecting senior citizens, and the growing antagonism between older and younger age groups.

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gsc1210

As our population ages, the issue of caregiving becomes increasingly important. This mini-course examines three types of caregiving: in the home, in an institution, and by developing supportive networks. Special consideration of how to help or counsel those facing the nursing home decision, including what to look for in a nursing home placement.

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gsc1001

An introduction to the study of the aging processes and individuals as they grow from middle age through later life. The course includes: the examination of physical, mental, and social changes in people as they age; the investigation of the changes in society resulting from an aging population; and the application of gerontological knowledge to policies and programs.

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gsc1200

The purpose of this course is to review the continuum of care of elders. Included will be a review of the health care plans, discharge plans, and case management needs of the elderly.

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ger1201

This is a basic course designed for students who have had little or no experience with the German language. The course includes drill in pronunciation, elementary conversation, grammar and writing, and the use of a cultural approach text. This is a comprehensive language course: teaching the four skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

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fre1201

This is a basic course designed for students who have had little or no experience with the French language. The course includes drill in pronunciation, elementary conversation, grammar, and writing, and the use of a cultural approach text. This is a comprehensive language course: teaching the four skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

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fin5000

This course is a survey of financial decision making within a business enterprise. Topics include examination of decision making on investments in fixed and current assets, and raising funds from suppliers of short and long-term funds. Students will examine quantitative and qualitative methods of planning and controlling investments in cash, marketable securities, receivables and inventories; bank relations and lending policies; sources of cash requirements; time-adjusted techniques of evaluating capital expenditure, cost of capital, leverage, and capital structure decision making.

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fin5210

This course analyzes the internal financial problems of a business enterprise. Topics include capital budgeting; evaluation of capital projects using discounted cash flow (internal rate of return and present value) and non-time-adjusted methods under conditions of certainty and uncertainty; capital structure theory and management; determining the cost of capital; the effect of leverage and dividend policy on cost of capital and firm policy; working capital management; liquidity structure of assets and liabilities; management of cash, marketable securities, receivables and inventories; financing, investment banking and the issue of long-term debt, preferred stock, common stock, convertible securities, and warrants; short and intermediate debt and lease financing, and short and long-term financial forecasting.

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fin4899

A supervised work experience for major in finance. Students will have the opportunity to observe professionals in action and to take part in office activities, thereby utilizing and improving skills learned through that observation along with those from classroom study.

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fin4651

Realistic and actual situation problems of interest to the student will be discussed on an advanced basis. Independent research on current problems and situations concerned with the various facets of finance will be directed.

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fin4213

This course covers the techniques of designing a budget and incorporating the information required to make budgets an effective tool of financial control. It also deals with spreadsheet techniques and focuses on the importance of integrating budgeting with overall financial and strategic plans. Special topics include activity based costing, zero based budgeting, variance analysis, and the integration of budgets with financial and sales forecasts.

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fin4010

The student will study of the structure, operations, and role of commercial banks. Attention will be given to sources and uses of funds, liquidity, earnings, capital structure, and regulation.

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fin4020

The course examines the principles and practices of land economics, forms of ownership with consideration of related areas of law, finance, insurance, taxation, investment, appraisal, and brokerage.

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fin3810

This course covers a study of the forces causing fluctuations in business activity. Possible devices to stabilize the economy will be explored. Also, the course will explore ways used by economists to attempt to predict the level of economic activity.

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fin3840

This course studies theories and techniques used at all levels of government management of an economy. Expenditure, receipt, budget, and debt policies will be emphasized.

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fin3800

The course is designed to help students master the theory and applications of financial management. Emphasis is on the analytical aspects of financial problem solving using theory and concepts applied to a business setting through the use of case examinations. The importance of advanced quantitative techniques and the useful application of capital budgeting techniques are stressed. The material covered and the cases and problems examined offer an opportunity to assess and understand daily decisions on risk and return facing the practicing manager.

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fin3240

The course presents the essentials of money and banking, with special reference to developments of recent years. Balanced emphasis upon both theoretical and practical aspects of the subject is the basis for interpretation of problems such as inflation, recession, the interest rate structure, and national debt.

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fin3650

An overview of the entrepreneurship process starting with the individual, the creativity process, the entrepreneurial idea/concept, and feasibility analysis, and concluding with the business plan. Field trip(s) and guest speakers (e. g., alumni and faculty) appropriate to venture startup and infancy are incorporated. Topics include forms of business organization, patent/copyright laws, management, finance, store layout, employee theft, and franchising.

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fin3200

This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of general theory and practice, with emphasis upon those principles common to all special fields: property, life, disability, liability, workers’ compensation, fidelity, and automobile insurance. Accounting majors may take this course for economics credit.

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fin3202

The course presents the organization and functions of the securities markets, types of investments, investment theories relating to risk and return on investments, and an appraisal of modern techniques in bond and stock valuation.

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fin3210

This course trains students in the preparation and presentation spreadsheets and financial models using MS Excel software. Topics covered include: financial functions (NPV, IRR, annuities, FV), capital budgeting, optimization of objective functions under constraints, the capital assets pricing model, forecasting, time series and regression analysis, inventory and working capital management, ratio analysis. The focus is on developing skills that are directly applicable in the current workplace environment.

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fin2003

This course introduces the student to financial management, with emphasis on the identification and solution of the financial problems facing business enterprises. Basic financial analysis is examined in concert with management of working capital, management of long-term assets, cost of capital, and long-term financing. Basic modern quantitative analytic techniques are used to introduce students to improved forecasting and planning methods.

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eng6839

Each student will create an 8-credit creative thesis that showcases his/her creative writing completed during the program, demonstrates social relevance, and includes scholarly references. In the thesis, the student is expected to explore something new, demonstrate seriousness of purpose, convey a sense of depth, and communicate an act of discovery or insight. S/he should select work that represents his or her individual stamp, but must also accompany it with a pertinent scholarly essay. Thus, every final thesis and portfolio will combine an academic paper relevant to the creative work compiled by the student over the course of study. The final product will include, not only the scholarly essay, but the creative works that have been produced, creating a robust portfolio of scholarship and creative writing. For example, a learner preparing a thesis based on the novel would include a scholarly piece that puts his/her novel in an historical, literary, and/or theoretical context, while signifying how his/her contribution relates to relevant literature in the field.

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fin1000

This course introduces students to concepts used in planning, control, and decision making in business and non-business organizations. Emphasis will be on developing, analyzing, and evaluating budget reports with a special focus on cost volume profit relationships, cost behavior, and human behavior aspects.

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eng6829

Each student will create an 8-credit creative thesis that showcases his/her creative writing completed during the program, demonstrates social relevance, and includes scholarly references. In the thesis, the student is expected to explore something new, demonstrate seriousness of purpose, convey a sense of depth, and communicate an act of discovery or insight. S/he should select work that represents his or her individual stamp, but must also accompany it with a pertinent scholarly essay. Thus, every final thesis and portfolio will combine an academic paper relevant to the creative work compiled by the student over the course of study. The final product will include, not only the scholarly essay, but the creative works that have been produced, creating a robust portfolio of scholarship and creative writing. For example, a learner preparing a thesis based on the novel would include a scholarly piece that puts his/her novel in an historical, literary, and/or theoretical context, while signifying how his/her contribution relates to relevant literature in the field.

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eng6809

The MFA in Creative Writing requires each student to participate in 4 credits of supervised field experience, spread over two trimesters. Because the MFA is often desired as a credential for faculty positions in higher education, some students may wish to do their field experience in a higher education setting. Others may wish to intern in community settings where teaching writing may be appropriate. Creating and running a writing group on a specific theme may be an appropriate placement and work with published writers in outside classes, tutorials or mentorship processes is also an option. It is possible that a student may arrange two different field experiences to fulfill the requirement. The AFE is arranged in advance and approved by both the student’s Advisor. Outside support, supervision and confirmation of work will be included. This may take the form of a site supervisor, a mentor, an administrator, or class members, who will validate the work experience and give feedback for the student.

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eng6819

Each student will make a formal presentation of the capstone project at his/her last residency. The student must have the proposal for the FPP approved prior to the final term of enrollment.

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eng6790

This course will involve the student in creating a longer piece or compilation of pieces that will be presented, edited and revised and re-presented. The essential aspect of revision will be a strong focus of this course, as the student builds a professional orientation as a young adult writer. The unique elements of finding voice for a teenage audience will be practiced. The course will lead directly into the final thesis and portfolio work.

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eng6770

This course will explore various young adult fiction genres. The focus will be on genre themes such as: fantasy; coming of age; realistic and historical fiction; and experimental. Experimentation in writing in a variety of genres will be a key element of the course, while students begin to focus on the types of writing that they are inspired towards. Forms of young adult writing, from short stories to the young adult novel will be included. “Workshopping” as an environment for sharing and receiving feedback will be a component of the course.

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eng6780

This course addresses the key issues of adolescent developmental stages, needs and capacities, in the context of literature that will support their development. The role of family literacy, as a key to positive outcomes for young adults and adolescents will be considered and the student, preparing to be an author and/ or teacher, will study and create practices that are intended to promote not only reading, but family literacy. From the classroom to the specific content of any book, the issues of development and the role of family and culture in that development are of great importance to the author, who must orient the work towards a developing adult.

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eng6750

This course will take the student into the world of young adult literature, with an orientation towards assessing the needs and interests of this unique population, typically considered to be between 12 and 18 years of age, though often extended in both directions. Basics of creative writing, as applied to young adult work, will be included and the class will invite a consideration of how to “reach” the teenage reader, transitioning from childhood into adulthood.

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eng6760

This course will move into the consideration of the field of young adult literature through extensive reading in and about young adult literature. Topics will include the elements of fiction and the variety and use of fiction strategies. The unique elements of pacing, developmental comprehension and young adult engagement in literature will be included. The role of the author and the purposes of writing for this audience will be considered. Issues of ethics in the field of fiction will be included, as will the overlap of fiction and nonfiction.

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eng6740

This course addresses the key issues of children’s developmental stages, needs and capacities, in the context of literature that will support their development. The role of family literacy, as a key to positive outcomes for children as readers will be considered and the student, preparing to be an author and/ or teacher, will study and create practices that are intended to promote not only reading, but family literacy. From the classroom to the specific content of any book, the issues of development and the role of family and culture in that development are of great importance to the author, who must orient the work towards a developing child.

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eng6710

This course will move into the consideration of the field of children’s literature through extensive reading in and about children’s literature. Topics will include the elements of children’s writing, based on age group and purpose, and the variety and use of appropriate writing strategies. The role of the children’s author and the desired outcomes in writing for children will be considered. Issues of ethics in the field will be included.

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eng6720

This course will explore the variety of books for children from picture books through beginning readers to chapter books and children’s novels. The theme of compelling stories to evoke a child’s interests will be held throughout. Key elements of writing, as they are applied uniquely to children’s fiction will be included, including the overarching writing principles that apply to all writing, including, plot, story development, character, dialogue and setting. “Workshopping,” writing for feedback within the group will be an essential element of the course.

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eng6730

This course will explore various children’s fiction genres. The focus will be on children’s writing up to young adulthood and will include consideration of genre themes such as: fantasy; fairy tales; realistic and historical fiction; child related educational (counting, alphabet, informational); and drama. Experimentation in writing in a variety of genres will be a key element of the course, while students begin to focus on the types of writing that they are inspired towards. The course work will lead directly towards the thesis/portfolio work.

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eng6690

This course will involve the student in creating a longer fiction piece or compilation of pieces that will be presented, edited and revised and re-presented. The essential aspect of revision will be a strong focus of this course, as the student builds a professional orientation as a fiction writer. The course will lead directly into the final thesis and portfolio work.

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eng6700

This course will take the student into the world of children’s literature, with a direct intention to learn to see through children’s eyes. Basics of creative writing, as applied to children’s work, will be included and the class will invite a balance between the imagination that inspires children and the professional orientation that a children’s author will hold in working in the field. The practice or writing, feedback and revision will be included in a process of exercises and writing practices.

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eng6660

This course will move into the consideration of the field of fiction through extensive reading in and about fiction and the theory of fiction. Topics will include the elements of fiction and the variety and use of fiction strategies. The role of the fiction author and the purposes of writing fiction will be considered. Issues of ethics in the field of fiction will be included, as will the overlap of fiction and nonfiction.

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eng6670

This course deepens an understanding of the basic principles of fiction writing including the elements and structure of a story, character, point of view, setting and description, dialogue and plot as they are applied to the writing of a novel. The aspects of constructing a novel from inspiration to development and writing will be explored, using both a firm grasp of the elements of craft and a strong orientation towards accessing inner creativity. This course advances theory and practice with an emphasis on “workshopping” or presenting work for feedback.

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eng6680

This course will explore not only various fiction genres, from fantasy to satire to tragedy, but also the forms in which these genres exist from flash fiction (very short prose) through short stories to novels. Experimentation in writing in a variety of genres will be a key element of the course, while students begin to focus on the types of writing that they are inspired towards.

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eng6630

The course will explore a variety of non-fiction mediums, to advance student writing skills across genres, to create an authorial identification and to take ownership of writing as a professional path. Working with techniques that evoke the work of fiction: imagination, theme, character and plot, the student will learn to work from within the authority of their knowledge base and research, to create non-fiction that inspires, informs and educates the reader.

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eng6640

This course will involve the student in creating a longer nonfiction piece or compilation of pieces that will be presented, edited and revised and re-presented. The essential aspect of revision will be a strong focus of this course, as the student builds a professional orientation as a writer. The role of the nonfiction author, as one with a strong and credible voice, will be considered and practiced. The course will lead directly into the final thesis and portfolio work.

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eng6650

This course considers the forms of creative fiction and focuses on the experience of reading and writing fiction. Exercises and assignments will invite the student to explore the genre of adult fiction and enter into the world of writing fiction. Focusing on techniques in writing and analysis of published fiction will deepen an understanding of the field of fiction and the writer’s place within it.

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eng6600

Creative non-fiction spans a huge array of material from personal narrative (essay, memoir, travel, nature) to inspirational and self-help books and on into professional writing, in any and all themes. This course will visit the wide array of creative non-fiction through reading, discussion, exercises and brief writing assignments, as well as writing for feedback. Writing non-fiction for young audiences will also be explored. The student will explore various genres of creative non-fiction and begin to articulate the personal goals for this field that he or she has

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eng6610

This course will move into the consideration of the field of nonfiction and its various genres through extensive reading in and about non-fiction. The variation of nonfiction writing, including narrative, expository, persuasive, reflective and descriptive will be discussed and noted as means towards the end of creating nonfiction. Issues of ethics in the field of nonfiction will be considered, as will the overlap of fiction and nonfiction.

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eng6620

This course advances theory and practice with an emphasis on “workshopping”, presenting work for feedback. This course will focus more deeply on the specific craft required for different genres. The student will have chosen the nonfiction orientation that best suits personal goals and the craft required for each genre will be considered by the student though reading in that genre, writing about that genre and writing in that genre.

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eng5580

This course focuses on the pedagogy and andragogy of the craft, assisting students in honing the craft of teaching writing and sharing writing with others. Students will explore how to create workshops, courses, writing groups, online seminars, and other forms of teaching and mentoring others.

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eng5590

This course focuses on models of entrepreneurial enterprise in creative writing. Taken near the end of the program, the topic is intended to assist students in thinking about how they can find venues for supporting and promulgating their work, including publishing, grant writing, funding, teaching, forming cooperatives, and working through social media.

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eng5570

This course focuses on the role that the arts (particularly creative writing) play in society, and how writing has been used throughout history and in different cultures to act as an agent of social observation, commentary, criticism and change. The writer and the writer’s role in the social realm will be considered. Regardless of the genre that one writes in, the writer exists in a social context and that context, as well as the writer’s experience both of present and past culture, will be considered as part of the writer’s tool kit.

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eng4375

This course will acquaint students with a wide range of critical approaches to literature in order for them to become better critical readers themselves. Texts will range from such classical critics as Aristotle, Johnson, and Poe to such recent theorists as Miller, Fish, and Derrida.

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eng4411

English 4411 is a study of the major trends in the development of English as it has grown from a dialect of West German to a major world language. Organized chronologically, the course will give some attention to ways in which modern linguistics has enhanced our understanding of language history.

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eng4694

Directed study involves readings and papers. A student may take a maximum of six hours of credit in English 399 during any single term and twelve hours altogether. The course is ordinarily limited to English majors who have senior status, fifteen hours of English courses beyond ENG1201 and ENG1202, and a B average in English. In exceptional cases, a student who is not an English major may be allowed to take directed study.

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eng4200

This is an advanced, writing-intensive course. Students will progress in a workshop setting through a series of assignments culminating in an individually chosen project. Each student will compile a portfolio of his or her writing. Students will be asked to evaluate their own work and to comment upon that of their classmates. In addition, some attention will be given to rhetorical theory.

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eng3490

This meets the requirement as a writing intensive course in the major. This course surveys representative authors of the Romantic, Victorian, and Early Modern Period, including authors Blake, Wordsworth, Byron, Austen, Dickens, Eliot, Browning, Conrad, Lawrence, Woolf, and Joyce.

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eng3800

A study of selected plays is arranged chronologically. Representative plays from Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, histories, and romances are studied.

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eng3480

This course studies the founders of the British Literary Tradition. Authors include Chaucer, Spenser, Jonson, Donne, Milton, Pope, Swift, and Johnson.

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eng3450

This course surveys works by such environmental writers as Henry David Thoreau, John Muir, Rachel Carson, Edward Abbey, Annie Dillard, Aldo Leopold, Bary Lopez, Terry Tempest Williams, Al Gore, William Cronon, and Bill McKibben.

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eng3400

This course is a historical survey of American literature and its relation to American culture from its beginnings in 1492 through the Civil War. Authors studied may include Bradford, Bradstreet, Edwards, Franklin, Jefferson, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Douglass, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson.

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eng3410

This course is a historical survey of American literature and its relation to American culture from the Civil War through the present. Authors studied may include Twain, Chopin, Frost, Hemingway, Faulkner, O’Neil, Williams, Updike, and Walker.

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eng3430

This course surveys British and American women writers from the 19th and 20th centuries. Authors will include: Jane Austen, Emily Dickinson, Willa Cather, Virginia Woolf, Toni Morrison, and Maxine Hong Kingston.

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eng3380

This course is a study of some of the literary qualities of the Old and New Testaments, with added attention given to the historical development of the English Bible.

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eng3290

This course explores the short story genre through reading a wide variety of short fiction, beginning with innovators such as Edgar Allan Poe and continuing through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries with writers such as D. H. Lawrence, Joyce Carol Oates, James Baldwin, Alice Walker, and Nadine Gordimer. Short fiction from various cultures, both eastern and western, will be read. The elements, unique to the short story and the challenge the genre itself presents by virtue of its brevity will be the focus. The role of the short story within the context of the societies that produce it will be discussed.

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eng3377

This course is a study of representative poems by major British and American poets since 1860. Poets may include Dickinson, Whitman, Browning, Hardy, Yeats, Frost, Williams, Stevens, and Lowell as well as other major figures. Some attention will be given to important critical concepts about poetry.

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eng3280

This course is a study of representative novels by major British and American novelists since 1800. Novelists may include Austen, the Brontes, Eliot, Dickens, Melville, Twain, Lawrence, Woolf, Joyce, Hemingway, and Faulkner, as well as other major figures.

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eng3282

This course explores the ways words and images function as symbol systems. The class will look at the illuminated poetry of William Blake as one site where words and images work both together and against one another. The class will also look at words and images in comic books, on film, and on the web. In addition to several written projects, each student will design and present either a PowerPoint slide show or a web site.

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eng3210

This survey examines the genre of drama in western culture beginning with ancient Greece, followed by a study of Roman drama. The focus then moves to the morality and mystery plays of the Middle Ages. Representative plays from the Renaissance, the Neoclassical period, and the modern era including the Theater of the Absurd will complete the course, which will explore how drama shapes and is shaped by culture and how individual dramaturgy distinguishes one playwright from another.

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eng2520

This course surveys highlights of African American literature. Writers include Douglass, Washington, DuBois, Hurston, Toomer, Bontemps, Hughes, Walker, Wilson, and Morrison.

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eng2530

This course provides an overview of contemporary Spanish American writers who depict the character, philosophy, social problems, attitudes towards human dignity, and the respect for human rights in Spanish-speaking countries. Such widely known and respected writers as Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortazer, Juan Rulfo, Luisa Valenzuela, Rosario Ferre, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and others are studied.

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eng3200

A series of courses that concentrate on a single significant topic in literature. Representative topics include: In Search of the American Dream, Nobel Prize Winners in Literature, and the City in Literature.

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eng2430

This course provides a one-semester overview of American literature from the colonial period to the present. Authors studied may include Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Douglass, Melville, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Frost, Hemingway, Faulkner, O’Neil, and Williams.

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eng2500

This course includes selections of poetry, fiction, drama, and memoir – works from established and esteemed writers from around the globe: Eastern Asia, South East Asia, the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Each piece and its author are placed within the context of his/her culture.

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eng2510

This course provides a one-term overview of British literature from the medieval period to the twentieth century. Authors may include Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Swift, Wordsworth, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Auden, Yeats, and others.

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eng2420

This course surveys literature extending from Neo-Classical to modern literature. Selections include Racine, Moliere, Swift, Flaubert, Tolstoy, and Dostoyevski.

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eng2400

Through the study of a variety of works translated into English, the student wil lhave the opportunity to examine human behavior, motivation, and reasoning from the perspective of French writers. Selected works of Moliere, Voltaire, Flaubert, Zola, Camus, and Sartre will be the focus of discussion and written reflection. Please note that this course is conducted in English and will count toward the General Education literature requirement.

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eng2410

This meets the requirement as a writing intensive course in the major. This is a survey of outstanding literature of the Western World from Homer to the Renaissance. There will be selections from, as well as complete works of, such authors as Homer, the Greek dramatists, Virgil, and Dante.

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eng2213

This course provides practice in the construction of speeches, analysis of appeals to various audiences, and development of the speaking voice. It is a practical course offered to fit the needs of students in all fields. In cases of over-enrollment, seniors will be given preference.

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eng2280

This meets the requirement as a writing intensive course in the major. A comprehensive treatment of the theory and practice of business communication and the development of skills in presenting technical information, with emphasis on the effectiveness of expression through written correspondence, reports, technical manuals, and job resumes. Writing as a rewriting process will be stressed. Students will investigate the development of business and technical literature from idea to draft, to final product.

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eng1202

ENG1202 is an advanced writing course and is designed to extend reading and writing skills developed in English 1201. Emphasis is placed on critical and analytical writing and the analysis and interpretation of texts. Students are exposed to a variety of texts from fields across the curriculum. They write essays in response to what they read by formulating and defending a thesis, by synthesizing sources, and by evaluating information and ideas from multiple perspectives. In addition, students demonstrate an ability to do research and to document their work in the major academic styles.

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eng1601

This course is an accelerated version of ENG1201. Enrollment in ENG1601 is determined by high performance on a placement examination or invitation into the AIC Honors Program.

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eng1100

English 1100 is a course that helps students develop fluency and confidence in their writing in preparation for the demands of ENG1201. The course focuses on improving writing through application and practice with an emphasis on grammar, punctuation, mechanics, and other fundamentals. Students examine writing as a process and engage in activities such as brainstorming, drafting, revising proofreading. Enrollment in ENG1100 is determined by performance on a placement test.

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eng1201

English Composition 1201 is a writing-intensive course that prepares students for all levels of academic discourse. Emphasis is placed on the art of persuasion, on the development of students’ critical thinking skills, and on key rhetorical concepts such as audience, purpose, and voice. Students learn the various steps to the writing process, from brainstorming to final revision, and learn the importance of writing coherent, unified, and organized essays that are fundamentally and mechanically sound. Though primarily a writing course, English Composition 101 also helps students see the connection between reading and writing. In addition, students learn the art of academic research and documentation. ENG1201 is determined by performance on a placement test or by satisfactory completion of ENG1100.

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edu9982

This course focuses on developing an appropriate research design for each student’s dissertation proposal. It includes articulating the research questions, choosing the design and being able to articulate its appropriateness to the inquiry at hand, discussing the assets and limitations of the design, human subjects and other ethical concerns, and proposed methods of data collection and analysis.

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edu9973

This course provides an overview of action research theory and methods and describes how action research can be used in school improvement. The steps for conceptualizing, designing, implementing, and analyzing an action research project are explicated and examples of school-based projects will be explored.

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edu9980

This course focuses on an introduction to the selection and construction of a research design and choice of appropriate research methods for the educational inquiry to be undertaken. A variety of research methods will be reviewed. The design and collection of data, data analysis, and ethical issues related to research with human subjects will be explored.

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edu9981

This course provides an overview of action research theory and methods and describes how action research can be used in school improvement. The steps for conceptualizing, designing, implementing, and analyzing an action research project are explicated and examples of school-based projects are provided.

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edu9970

This course focuses on the concept of qualitative research. It will aid the student in developing an understanding of what qualitative research is, what the types of qualitative research are, when to use it, and how to develop a well-designed research study using qualitative research methods. The course will go on to help the student code the findings and write a dissertation using the qualitative method of data gathering and analysis.

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edu9971

This course provides a framework for using quantitative methods in educational research. The course will focus on a wide range of quantitative research methods including experimental, correlational and survey research among others. Additionally, students will review the different steps in quantitative research, the determination of different options for types of data collected and the ability to locate, select, and assess an instrument(s) for data collection. Specifying variables, reliability, validity, scales of measurement, scoring of the data, and selection of a statistical program will also be discussed.

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edu9952

This course focuses on the concept of qualitative research. It will aid the student in developing an understanding of what qualitative research is, what the types of qualitative research are, when to use it, and how to develop a well-designed research study using qualitative research methods. The course will go on to help the student code the findings and write a dissertation using the qualitative method of data gathering and analysis.

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edu9901

Until recently colleges, universities, or institutions of higher learning never sought nor needed counsel on retainer. Obviously that is no longer the case. This course will discuss current legal issues and equip future higher education administrators the tools to handle them. A variety of topics will be discussed, such as the current structure of the legal court system and their recent decisions affecting higher education, distinctions between private, public and quasi-public institutions; the granting of tenure; liability for student behavior and their well-being; limitations on the power of higher education to discipline students for behavior, academic, and professional misconduct; issues of student privacy; affirmative action and other attempts at creating diversity; sexual harassment; anti-discrimination, such as Title IX, ADA, etc; and what is the future for higher education and the law?

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edu9902

This course will help students examine how US colleges and universities are responding to the challenges of the 21st Century of internationalization and globalization. The readings will provide theory and practical information about the ways colleges and universities are international, which will include discussions with leaders in the various areas of US higher education internationalization.

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edu9951

This course provides a framework for using quantitative methods in educational research. The course will focus on a wide range of quantitative research methods including experimental, correlational and survey research among others. Additionally, students will review the different steps in quantitative research, the determination of different options for types of data collected and the ability to locate, select, and assess an instrument(s) for data collection. Specifying variables, reliability, validity, scales of measurement, scoring of the data, and selection of a statistical program will also be discussed

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edu9900

This course examines the governance and administration of higher and postsecondary education institutions in the United States with particular emphasis on providing an understanding of theoretical and practical approaches to leading institutions. Students will read about the functioning of higher and postsecondary institutions; the administrative practices of colleges and universities; organizational and administrative theory of higher and postsecondary education; and roles of governing boards, administrators, faculty members, and students in policy making.

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edu9549

Dissertation 3 is the final block of required dissertaion writing. It yiekds the last two chapters of the dissertaion (chapters four or five) and completes the document. Credit is awarded when the student successfully presents his/her research findings and recommendations and submits the fully edited and approved dissertation to his/her Dissertation Committee.

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edu9529

Dissertation 1 is the first in a three-course block of final required dissertation writing. It yields the first two chapters of the dissertation: Introduction and literature Review. Credit is awarded when the students submits the fully edited and approved version of these two chapters to his/her Dissertation Committee.

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edu9539

Course Dissertation 2 is the second of the three-course clock of final required dissertation writing. Dissertation research consists of conducting the approved research developed the individualized research design yields and the Research Methodology chapter of the dissertation (chapter three. Credit is awarded when the dstudent submits the fully edited and approved version ofthis chapter to his/her Dissertation Committee and receives their approva; for the completed data gathering.

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edu9499

This course provides a culminating experience that allows each student to reflect on his or his scholarly and professional growth over the program of study. In organizing the portfolio according to program competencies and values, the student provides evidence of his/her meeting those outcomes, as well as concentration-specific and individual goals laid out in the Degree plan.

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edu9509

Dissertation research 1 is the first of a two-block experience involving original doctoral research. In this course, the student will gather data to be reported in chapter four of the dissertation, using the research design developed in individualized research design.

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edu9519

Dissertation research 2 is the second of a two-block experience involving original doctoral research. In this course, the student will analyze his/her collected data, including re-engaging with the seminal scholarly literature presented in chapter 2. Data analysis will conform to the methods described in individual Research Design. In addition to analysis, the student will be able to discuss the scholarly and practitioner implications of his/her findings as well as directions for future research.

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edu8894

In these courses, a student pursues, in-depth, an individualized program of reading and/or research with supervision by first and second core faculty.

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edu8892

This course surveys the history of higher education in the United States with a focus on mainstream collegiate institutions and current non-traditional alternatives. The course will trace the development of traditional higher education from its liberal arts origins through the growth of the major research university. Additionally, it will explore how, over two centuries, various underrepresented groups (women, minorities, etc. ) have contended for places within higher education.

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edu8893

This course examines major events in the development of colleges and universities in the United States and the philosophical, historical, and social forces that have influenced this development. The course examines contemporary issues in higher education by exploring the intersections of historical, philosophical, and sociological forces that have shaped and continue to shape U. S. higher education, as well as the ways in which higher education has shaped society. International/comparative higher education is also introduced.

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edu8884

In these courses, a student pursues, in-depth, an individualized program of reading and/or research with supervision by first and second core faculty.

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edu8890

This course will examine issues related to equity, diversity, and their implications for educational settings. Personal and community biases will be scrutinized regarding: race, gender, socio-economic status, culture, sexual orientation, religion, second language learners, and persons with special needs. Through coursework, group work, and situational case studies, students will be challenged to examine their attitudes toward these critical issues and to become sensitive and proactively responsive to them. Students will learn of the leadership capacities needed to ensure access, and academic and social equity for all members of the extended school community.

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edu8891

This course Planning and Organizational Change draws on a number of academic disciplines that provide a theoretical as well as practical basis for understanding change at the community and school level. We will apply planning theory from traditions of sociology, political science, and psychology to real organizations in local communities, using theories of practice of community social work and action research.

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edu8882

The course focuses on the creation and maintenance of collaborative models of parent-school interaction that supports student achievement. Particular attention is paid to such issues as building effective partnerships with hard to reach parents, those who traditionally have been marginalized from schools, and non traditional families. It also explores issues such as parent-teacher conferences, parents as volunteers in schools, and maintaining parental involvement as students move into secondary schools.

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edu8883

This course focuses on an analysis of how the brain integrates, stores, and communicates information. It includes a review of research on how the brain functions and the link to effective teaching practices. The application of brain research to teaching strategies, lesson plans, and problem-solving activities will be stressed.

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edu8881

This course includes studies in the literature and research on encouraging teacher leadership at all levels of practice:classroom,school,district state and national leadership styles, recognizing oppurtunities for leadership within different forums in their professional lives,and collaborating with others to effect meaningful change.

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edu8874

In these courses, a student pursues, in-depth, an individualized program of reading and/or research with supervision by first and second core faculty.

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edu8880

This course provides advanced exploration of theory and research in human and institutional resiliency with an eye towards how such theory and research can be translated into educational practice. Factors that create risk and promote resiliency in students will be examined, as well as interventions to mitigate situations that put students at risk.

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edu8873

Administrators must know the laws that govern the operation and conduct of their organizations as they face a highly litigious society. This course will study the relevant legal principles that affect the operation, organization, and administration of schools. Students will gain knowledge about legal issues that will help them in effectively performing their professional duties within the boundaries of constitutional, statutory, and case law.

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edu8871

Leadership describes an individual’s ability to influence. This course is a survey of selected research that addresses the development of leadership skills, the academic field of leadership studies, the roles of leadership in education, including transactional, transformational, and post-modern theory. Leadership is examined, not only from the perspective of personal development, but also in the contexts of organizational and systems theories. Moreover, since the literature relating to leadership is varied, with approaches ranging from popular, “self-help” to serious academic scholarship, this course provides the opportunity to compare and contrast this wide range of leadership analysis.

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edu8872

Methods, theories, and research applying to the supervision and evaluation of classroom instruction; includes analysis and application of research in effective teaching practices, formative and summative evaluation, staff development, data collection techniques, and alternative feedback methods. This course will focus on the role of the district administrator in the supervisory process from the legal aspects to the coaching of principals.

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edu8870

The School Finance course is essential for the school administrator. Responsible for the ethical and strategic use of resources, the administrator cannot completely delegate financial responsibility to another office. Thus this course will cover a broad range of topics designed to acquaint the students with the knowledge of: funding formulas, accounting procedures, procurement regulations, taxation principles, fiduciary oversights, audits, and general management of state and local funding formulas. Emphasis will be placed on developing skills necessary to manage the financial program of a district and, in turn, a school.

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edu8862

This course focuses on promoting theoretical and applied understandings of school personnel management in an ever-changing professional educational environment. Emphasis will be placed on understanding effective ways of dealing with labor relations, personnel appraisal, communication, disciplinary procedures, leadership systems and designs, and compensation structuring. Focus will be on applicable laws and the roles and responsibilities of school leaders in the area of human resource management in educational settings will be examined.

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edu8863

Positive Organizational Scholarship (POS) focuses on the organic whole of leadership practices from a perspective of positive thinking. This course will challenge students to engage in the core topics and foundational theories of POS and positive psychology, and to investigate their interface. Positive Organizational Scholarship (POS) investigates collective and emergent processes of optimal functioning, at the levels of individual in organization, groups in organizations, and organizations as a whole. POS focuses on the generative dynamics in organizing that enable individuals and collective resilience, thriving, creativity compassion, and other indicators of human function. POS is not one particular theory; it does draw from the full spectrum of organizational theories. Positive psychology is a movement that challenges the field of psychology. It does not draw from the old model of deficient but instead encourages research on strengths, on building the best things in leadership practices as well as repairing the worst.

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edu8864

In these courses, a student pursues, in-depth, an individualized program of reading and/or research with supervision by first and second core faculty.

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edu8860

This course in curriculum will provide an introduction to the foundational areas that affect the design and development of curriculum. The course will include the history, social forces, philosophy, and psychology behind many of the curriculum practices and issues that exist in schools today as well as the nature of the curriculum development process. The focus of this course will be on the process of using knowledge about curriculum and evaluation in an imaginative, creative way. Ultimately, the educator will then be able to anticipate and plan for change in an active way, rather than falling prey to every bandwagon or societal pressure that affects the school curriculum.

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edu8861

This course will explore the complexity of evaluating student performance in a meaningful way. A variety of philosophies, templates, constructs, guidelines, artifacts, research findings and beliefs about collecting and using student performance data to improve instruction will be examined. The course also will explore how school reform efforts have influenced or been influenced by assessment practices.

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edu8852

This course is designed to help students develop an advanced understanding of how learning and developmental theories define the teacher’s role as an instructional leader, how students learn, what motivates learners, and the design and delivery of the curriculum is influenced by these factors.

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edu8853

This course allow for re-examination of one’s own motivation for entering the profession, what values guide current practice, and what inspires that practice. The notion of teaching as both an “art” and a “science” will be explored, along with research on effective teaching. The course also allows for consideration of what teaching models and philosophies are most meaningful at this point in one’s career.

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edu8851

This course focuses on theory and research about developing teacher competencies for motivating and increasing student learning through the advanced understanding of the interaction of classroom management and instructional planning. Topics include the creation of successful learning communities, approaches to discipline, and creative problem solving.

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edu8841

This course focuses on current trends and issues in the use of technology in K-12 schools. Among the topics covered are the use of technology as a tool for teaching and learning, making technologically-assisted learning meaningful, creating active learning through the use of technology, and the “digital divide” and its implications for schooling.

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edu8842

This course focuses on developing one’s understanding of the knowledge and skills necessary to increase effectiveness in meeting the needs of diverse learners through appropriate instructional, curricular, and behavioral strategies. It also aims to assist students in exploring the topics of race/ethnicity, religion, socioeconomic class, and language as they related to teaching to diversity.

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edu8850

This course focuses on developing one’s understanding of the knowledge and skills necessary to increase effectiveness in meeting the needs of diverse learners through appropriate instructional, curricular, and behavioral strategies. It also aims to assist students in exploring the topics of race/ethnicity, religion, socioeconomic class, and language as they related to teaching to diversity.

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edu8840

This course will encompass skill building strategies and exercises in critical thinking, listening, and identity based communication. We will explore how to negotiate, facilitate, and mediate global education. Our goal is to begin the process of understanding the theory, concepts, and skills necessary for developing the cultural mobility among participants required to successfully embrace globally diverse school populations that will yield effective value added relationships and outcomes.

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edu8520

A seminar course covering current trends in the research literature. Essentially, “whats happening now” in the field of learning disabilities. Presentations by students on individual topics will be covered in-depth.

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edu8806

This course provides field-based experience that allows students to apply theoretical knowledge to professional and scholarly objectives, and arrange supervision, where necessary. Faculty approval is required before the internship can commence.

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edu7761

This course introduces financial aspects of higher educational institutions with an emphasis on the use of financial information for decision making. Financial decision making describes in a way that is informative and useful so that higher educational leaders can effectively manage the allocation of financial resources. Specific topics will include financial analysis, budget creation and oversight. The emphasis is on using financial data for decision making related to resource allocation, forecasting, capital initiatives, and other future planning. THIS COURSE IS NOW ASSIGNED TO A DIRECTED STUDY.

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edu7762

This course examines the various ways in which social and cultural factors influence education. It will review sociological research findings on such topics as learning and social class, teacher and parental expectations, learning and gender, ethnicity, and the relation between learning and family rearing practices. In considering the cultural influences on contemporary education, students will study a variety of multicultural education models, the transmission of culture in a pluralistic society, and the role of education in the acculturation and assimilation process.

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edu7763

This course will provide students with an understanding of current learning styles research and how this research can influence positive student academic success. The course will also include research about teaching strategies that have proven to successfully accommodate different learning styles for the typical and atypical learner. THIS COURSE IS NOW ASSIGNED TO A DIRECTED STUDY.

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edu7753

This course focuses on developing one’s understanding of adult development throughout the life span and its implications for educational practice. Regardless of role and formal job description, all educators must interact with adults, and an appreciation for the developmental tasks of personal and career cycles is essential. Course content is designed to stimulate thinking about how to promote growth and transformation in one’s own life and with others.

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edu7760

Self-Renewal This course focuses on examining the use of reflective practice to improve instruction and leadership techniques and to engender professional dialogue among colleagues. Facilitating one’s own critical reflection, as well as encouraging that in others, is a key component of teaching, learning, and leading. The course content also explores the concept of self-renewal and resilience as indicators of health and wellness in individuals and educational institutions. The key role that mentoring can play in initiating novice educators into the profession, supporting individual growth and sustaining the enthusiasm of veteran educators also is addressed.

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edu7752

This course focuses on the premise that all educators, regardless of formal title, role or position, need to assume responsibility for leadership in service of improving their institution and its members. Further, all educators must be responsible for developing the leadership capacity of those in their care. The course content addresses various theories of leadership, finding one’s own leadership style, and thinking about leadership in such populations as teachers, staff, and students.

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edu7751

This course focuses on an examination of the ethical considerations of educational practice in contemporary society.

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edu7711

With the ongoing support of the research advisor, students will write a formal paper, in the form of a professional journal article, describing the project and reporting the results and conclusions, along with the implications for classroom practice. They will also prepare a presentation for a Professional Development Academy, and a separate document in which they focus on the potential impact on the home/school system as the insights and information gained from the project are fed back into the system.

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edu7750

This course focuses on examining the use of reflective practice to improve instruction and leadership techniques and to engender professional dialogue among colleagues. Facilitating one’s own critical reflection, as well as encouraging that in others, is a key component of teaching, learning, and leading. The course content also explores the concept of self-renewal and resilience as indicators of health and wellness in individuals and educational institutions.

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edu7703

This course is focused upon the development of a research problem and the completion of a literature search. Current issues in education will provide the context for individual projects that link important questions with professional practice. The course products will be a research question and a literature review; these products will provide the foundation for the rest of the program.

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edu7710

Students in this course work with the support of research advisors to develop a research plan for their action project, based on the products of EDU 7703. Students will secure the necessary permissions (including that of an IRB, if applicable), collect the data, and analyze the data according to the plan.

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edu7701

This course serves as an introduction to the process of action research, as well as to the PDARP program. Students will review the major techniques and paradigms in social science research, particularly as applied within education. Legal and ethical issues will be addressed, including those related to intellectual property and human subjects research. Examples of various types of research will be analyzed. Particular attention will be given to action research as presented and published. The application of research results and conclusions to the improvement of classroom practice will be addressed. An introduction to statistical analysis will be provided.

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edu7702

This course explores in more detail the research paradigms used in education research, with a focus on those most useful in action research. Students will develop hypothetical research protocols for several types of studies. They will also review the technological support for research and its dissemination, including the use of statistical software, rich media and submitting to on-line journals.

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edu6999

This activity is the culminating requirement for candidates seeking licensure as a School Administrator or Director. Students engage in a 300-hour activity in the schools, working with a principal or director in the level and role appropriate for their specialization area. Supervision is provided by college faculty during this activity.

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edu6890

This course will provide in-depth learning in a seminar format utilizing presentations, videos and experts in the field to enhance and advance the learning that has taken place through the coursework. This seminar will drill down into those issues that face the Superintendent in his or her daily work. The candidate will be able to undertake the position of Superintendent of Schools with a realistic idea of the expectations before them. This course will cover the myriad of legal, ethical and mandated regulations and will include: Facilities and Planning (working with the MSBA), The Politics of the Superintendency (Local, State and Federal Issues), Effective Communication with a variety of groups, Public Relations, Media Relations, Collective Bargaining, Strategic Thinking and Planning and Balancing a Professional and Personal Life. All topics will look at the range of conditions that can be dealt with in a variety of settings such as Urban, Suburban and Rural School districts.

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edu6979

Students majoring in one of the above specialty areas may opt for the appropriate field experience which will satisfy the degree requirement for a culminating experience. Candidates will have the opportunity to delve into data collection and analysis, designing program for diverse populations, technology, developing 21st century skills, as examples, and/or other principles learned in their coursework to the end of increasing student achievement in the classroom. An action based research project is the central activity for this course. Employed teachers may utilize their own classrooms for this culminating experience [40 clock hours per credit]. Students who complete their degree with this culminating project are not eligible for licensure as a teacher or administrator in Massachusetts nor will they receive the NASDTEC stamp for reciprocity with other states.

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edu6989

This activity is the culminating requirement for candidates seeking licensure as a School Administrator or Director. Students engage in a 300-hour activity in the schools, working with a principal or director in the level and role appropriate for their specialization area. Supervision is provided by college faculty during this activity.

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edu6869

The practicum requirement for initial licensure in MA for those employed as classroom teachers in the field in which they are seeking licensure. 150-300 full-role hours of teaching under the direction of a college supervisor and a supervising practitioner in a school setting. A program portfolio and additional paperwork to meet state regulations is required.

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edu6850

This course looks at the various ethnic and minority/majority cultures and populations attending U. S. urban schools today, including low income, and ELL. Students will explore social, behavior, and academic needs of the urban population through researching readings, articles, short fiction, childrens literature, autobiographical selections, and historical documents. The format of the class will be participatory.

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edu6859

For candidates seeking teacher licensure, this is the 300-hour practicum-equivalent for classroom teachers employed in the field in which they are seeking licensure. A minimum of 150 hours must be logged in the full-role of teaching. There is an application process. Students will be assigned a college supervisor. A portfolio and documentation for the Massachusetts Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education is required at the conclusion.

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edu6829

The practicum requirement for initial licensure in MA for those employed as classroom teachers in the field in which they are seeking licensure. 150-300 full-role hours of teaching under the direction of a college supervisor and a supervising practitioner in a school setting. A program portfolio and additional paperwork to meet state regulations is required.

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edu6839

The practicum requirement for initial licensure in MA for those employed as classroom teachers in the field in which they are seeking licensure. 150-300 full-role hours of teaching under the direction of a college supervisor and a supervising practitioner in a school setting. A program portfolio and additional paperwork to meet state regulations is required.

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edu6849

The practicum for initial licensure as a Reading Specialist in MA for those employed in the field involves 150 hours of teaching under the direction of a college supervisor and a supervising practitioner in a school setting. A program portfolio and additional paperwork to meet state regulations is required.

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edu6769

The practicum for initial licensure in MA involves 150-300 hours of observation, assisting and taking on the full role of classroom teacher under the direction of a college supervisor and a supervising practitioner in a school setting. A program portfolio and additional paperwork to meet state regulations is required.

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edu6819

The practicum requirement for initial licensure in MA for those employed as classroom teachers in the field in which they are seeking licensure. 150-300 full-role hours of teaching under the direction of a college supervisor and a supervising practitioner in a school setting. A program portfolio and additional paperwork to meet state regulations is required.

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edu6765

The essential question to be answered in this course is: What are the skills and knowledge required to be an effective Administrator of Special Education? This course is for prospective administrators of Special Education. Students will gain knowledge of state and federal legislation, budget development, programs and services, and technology related to special education. Parents and family involvement, educational leadership, special education program management, professional development, and equity in special education will be highlighted.

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edu6749

The practicum for initial licensure as a Reading Specialist in MA involves 150 hours of teaching under the direction of a college supervisor and a supervising practitioner in a school setting. A program portfolio and additional paperwork to meet state regulations is required.

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edu6755

The economics of education with regard to budget and finance at all levels of a school district will be studied. The focus will include revenue sources, state and federal school aid, budget preparation, use of technology in the budget process, school building construction and alternative funding. Use of data to support budgets and budget requests will be examined. This course is designed for future superintendents/assistant superintendents and principals/assistant principals. It provides administrators with the tools they need to carry out fiscal policy in the public school system.

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edu6759

The practicum for initial licensure in MA involves 150-300 hours of observation, assisting and taking on the full role of classroom teacher under the direction of a college supervisor and a supervising practitioner in a school setting. A program portfolio and additional paperwork to meet state regulations is required.

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edu6739

The practicum for initial licensure in MA involves 150-300 hours of observation, assisting and taking on the full role of classroom teacher under the direction of a college supervisor and a supervising practitioner in a school setting. A program portfolio and additional paperwork to meet state regulations is required.

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edu6745

The study and analysis of school law will be undertaken from both historical and current perspectives. Constitutional amendments will be studied as they relate to administrative practice. Federal, state and local laws and regulations will be analyzed with respect to their importance and impact on schools and districts. Emphasis will be placed on Massachusetts State Law. Local policy development and implementation will also be reviewed. Precedent-setting federal and state court cases will be studied including their philosophical underpinnings and their implications for a framework for administrative decision making. Technology will be used to research a variety of case law.

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edu6719

The practicum for initial licensure in MA involves 150-300 hours of observation, assisting and taking on the full role of classroom teacher under the direction of a college supervisor and a supervising practitioner in a school setting. A program portfolio and additional paperwork to meet state regulations is required.

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edu6729

The practicum for initial licensure in MA involves 150-300 hours of observation, assisting and taking on the full role of classroom teacher under the direction of a college supervisor and a supervising practitioner in a school setting. A program portfolio and additional paperwork to meet state regulations is required.

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edu6678

This course provides a study of mathematics curricula and various methods for planning instruction and evaluation in the secondary or middle school classroom. A survey of current textbooks, instructional materials, and testing materials will be included. Changes and developments in the area of teaching mathematics will be addressed through current professional literature. Field experience is required.

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edu6674

This course offers an analysis and a practical look at the most effective methods of planning and teaching in a middle and/or secondary classroom. The major emphasis of the course is the development of a subject-area instructional unit appropriate to their teaching situation (urban, suburban or rural) that will include activities and strategies is such areas as cross-curricular, differentiated instruction, cooperative learning, integration of technology and indirect teaching methods. Micro-teaching experiences within the student’s discipline area will focus on specific components of lesson planning and lesson presentation in keeping with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. Field experience is required.

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edu6675

This Course in intended to give the new school leader the skills and knowledge necessary to provide a supervision and instruction to faculty who are teaching students who are under the SEI umbrella. Changing demographic data, equity issues and legislative policies related to the English Language Leaner will be reviewed. The principles of Sheltered English Immersion(SEI)will be analyzed and applied in the candidate’s school environment. With successful completion of this course, participants will have fulfilled mandatory requirements for the Massachusetts Administrators SEI endorsement.

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edu6654

This course will examine the substantial variety of student-centered evaluation practices and their importance in instructional planning for diverse student populations. Beyond the consideration of various standardized measures and traditional classroom testing and grading techniques, students will study 21st century assessment practices such as performance-based assessment, formative assessment strategies, open-ended questions, portfolios, and affective assessment, all of which emphasize higher-order critical thinking. The development of checklists, rubrics, and other methods of data collection will be emphasized. This technology-intensive course requires a unit plan created according to the principles of backwards design.

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edu6664

This course addresses the developmental reading and language needs of the middle and high school student in the content area classroom spanning from “learning to read” to “reading to learn.” The strategic use of multiple texts, including 21st century technology literacies, will be presented using micro-teaching lessons to demonstrate effective practice. Using technology to access national and local assessment data, students will analyze and identify areas of need within the English language arts and their intended subject area to guide instructional decision-making. Instructional accommodations for diverse learners will explore methods in sheltered English language immersion, special education, gifted and talented enrichment, and compensatory strategies for rural and urban poverty populations. Field work experiences and a diagnostic case-study assignment will integrate all course components. On-line research of the National Reading Panel Report and other professional sources will be integral to course learning. Field experience is required.

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edu6669

Students majoring in one of the above specialty areas may opt for the appropriate field experience which will satisfy the degree requirement for a culminating experience. Candidates will have the opportunity to delve into data collection and analysis, designing program for diverse populations, technology, developing 21st century skills, as examples, and/or other principles learned in their coursework to the end of increasing student achievement in the classroom. An action based research project is the central activity for this course. Employed teachers may utilize their own classrooms for this culminating experience [40 clock hours per credit]. Students who complete their degree with this culminating project are not eligible for licensure as a teacher or administrator in Massachusetts nor will they receive the NASDTEC stamp for reciprocity with other states.

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edu6645

This advanced methods and portfolio course will focus on the participant’s deeper understanding of the Professional Standards for Teachers and their ability to demonstrate how this understanding translates into teaching practices used in their classrooms. Participants will increase their knowledge base for sharing best practices by reflecting on exemplars of quality lessons. The project-based assessment of evidence of their comprehensive knowledge and skills will be the creation and development of a Professional Portfolio. This course will guide participants to review, reflect and advance to a higher level of understanding and application in the following areas: using the MA Curriculum Frameworks and the Professional Standards for Teachers for effective planning and assessment of curriculum and methods of instruction, classroom management, the political culture of the teaching profession, professionalism, teaching philosophy, multicultural and equity issues. It is important that a teacher is constantly in touch with his/her philosophy as he/she plans, teaches, and assesses. This course will guide participants to further examine their belief systems within their teaching practice. Participants will write and revise a philosophy paper throughout this course that reflects their philosophy and belief system.

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edu6649

Students majoring in one of the above specialty areas may opt for the appropriate field experience which will satisfy the degree requirement for a culminating experience. Candidates will have the opportunity to delve into data collection and analysis, designing program for diverse populations, technology, developing 21st century skills, as examples, and/or other principles learned in their coursework to the end of increasing student achievement in the classroom. An action based research project is the central activity for this course. Employed teachers may utilize their own classrooms for this culminating experience [40 clock hours per credit]. Students who complete their degree with this culminating project are not eligible for licensure as a teacher or administrator in Massachusetts nor will they receive the NASDTEC stamp for reciprocity with other states.

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edu6640

Studying Skillful Teaching focuses on improving student learning and achievement by building capacity in three major areas: 1) teacher’s use of a varied and extensive professional knowledge base about teaching, 2) students’ and teachers’ beliefs about their own ability to learn, 3) schools and school systems’ ability to create and sustain professional communities characterized by shared goals, collaborative work, and shared accountability. During the course students examine and experiment with: Approaches to a) planning for mastery, b) monitoring learning and adjusting instruction and, c) providing feedback on work in a standards-based environment; Ways to frame learning and help students make connections; Matches between explanatory devices and questioning patterns and standards and objectives; Opportunities to send students clear expectation messages and to help students acquire the strategies and mindsets that characterize effective effort; Ways to link and capitalize on the knowledge of skilled individuals to build cultures that sustain learning achievement.

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edu6639

Students majoring in one of the above specialty areas may opt for the appropriate field experience which will satisfy the degree requirement for a culminating experience. Candidates will have the opportunity to delve into data collection and analysis, designing program for diverse populations, technology, developing 21st century skills, as examples, and/or other principles learned in their coursework to the end of increasing student achievement in the classroom. An action based research project is the central activity for this course. Employed teachers may utilize their own classrooms for this culminating experience [40 clock hours per credit]. Students who complete their degree with this culminating project are not eligible for licensure as a teacher or administrator in Massachusetts nor will they receive the NASDTEC stamp for reciprocity with other states.

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edu6630

Principles and practices utilized in the supervision of educational personnel and programs as defined by both traditional and current supervisory practices will be examined in this course. The impact of the Massachusetts Education Reform Act of 1993, the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Standards and Indicators for the Evaluation of Teachers and Administrators will be studied as part of institutional reform. Multiple approaches to classroom observations and evaluations that are both informative and instructive will be central to the course. Model supervision and evaluation district programs, consistent with state guidelines, will be reviewed. Attention will also focus on action plans developed by schools and school districts to address the achievement gap existing between and among high need student groups in the schools particularly gaps affecting SEI/ELL students, and other student subgroups. Educator improvement plans to address the effectiveness of teachers whose performance is less than satisfactory according to state and contractual guidelines will also be considered in depth. The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s five step continuous learning process will also be studied by class members. Enrollment in graduate program in School Leadership EDU5601

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edu6635

The course will prepare for the planning and operation of the personnel functions in a school district. Emphasis will be placed on practices and issues, system operations and effectiveness, and knowledge of the different aspects of the human resource system. This course will focus for individual and group functions in the administration of school personnel and provide theory and content of practices and issues applicable to personnel administration. Enrollment in graduate program in School Leadership EDU5601

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edu6629

Students majoring in one of the above specialty areas may opt for the appropriate field experience which will satisfy the degree requirement for a culminating experience. Candidates will have the opportunity to delve into data collection and analysis, designing program for diverse populations, technology, developing 21st century skills, as examples, and/or other principles learned in their coursework to the end of increasing student achievement in the classroom. An action based research project is the central activity for this course. Employed teachers may utilize their own classrooms for this culminating experience [40 clock hours per credit]. Students who complete their degree with this culminating project are not eligible for licensure as a teacher or administrator in Massachusetts nor will they receive the NASDTEC stamp for reciprocity with other states.

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edu6620

The seminar sequence is arranged across the culminating semester to integrate specific topics and competencies with the teaching experience. Various areas of study will include health, media and technology, education of diverse populations (including ELL), data collection and analysis, development and implementation of IEPs, and legal issues. There will also be opportunities for peer mentoring. Students will generate products for inclusion in their portfolios by extending seminar concepts into classroom applications. Two research papers and a powerpoint presentation are required.

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edu6625

This course will provide a comprehensive model for instruction for preparing teachers to work with English language learners, (preK-12) in all classrooms. Using a structured immersion approach (SEI), such as the SIOP Model, students will practice the cycle of assessment, lesson design and implementation of instructional strategies that provide access to grade level content for ELL learners. Students will plan, design and present a model lesson following the SIOP Model.

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edu6610

Students will engage in a survey of current practices of classroom management for regular and special needs students. Theory, materials, and practical applications will be included. Special attention is given to communication, observation, group and class management skills. Students will master terminology relative to cognitive behavioral programming and educational applications. Students will become familiar with classroom management techniques and demonstrate the ability to identify specific target behaviors, develop positively based programming strategies, establish manageable data collection methods, and analyze data using empirically based strategies. Federal and State regulatory mandates will be studied with a focus on the implementation of Functional Behavioral Assessments within the naturalistic setting. Students will become familiar with strategies that reduce or eliminate disruptiveness, aggressiveness, and defiance. They will learn practical ways of achieving better home-school relations and become familiar with services of the resource staffs as well as services provided by other (State and private agencies) in order to meet the needs of exceptional students.

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edu6619

The individual seeking Professional Teacher Licensure will work as a teacher-researcher in the classroom (school system) with the goal of improving students’ subject area learning and achievement based on specific, data and evidence collected in Professional Seminar I. The educator develops a research topic, creates a hypothesis, selects methods and materials for the intervention procedure, and carries out the research plan using a pre-post design. Data collection, control-group comparisons, observation and informal measures are used to analyze the results of the intervention. A formal, written research paper will be submitted documenting all phases of the research process.

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edu6595

This course examines a full range of effective early childhood programs and curriculum. State curriculum documents, along with a variety of assessments, materials and teaching strategies are examined for their effectiveness in addressing the diverse cognitive, language, and developmental characteristics of young learners. Particular consideration is given to special needs of children with limited English proficiency, cognitive or language deficits, learning disabilities, economic or social disadvantage, etc. A research paper and presentation designed around one exceptionality is required. The administration and interpretation of informal and formal screening and evaluation procedures will be used to assess individual students. Assessment findings are used to plan instruction for young children with and without special needs.

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edu6600

This course involves learning techniques for teaching and assessing students with special needs both in and out of the general education environment. Class sessions will be devoted to lectures, demonstrations, discussions, audio-visual material, and topics of particular interest within the area of assessment. Course content will focus on learners (PK through adults) who are not experiencing success within the standard academic situation and on identified special needs students in need of (re)evaluation. Students are expected to become familiar with standardized assessments, interpretation of evaluation data, and acquire an understanding of regulations governing the assessment and evaluation process. Students will demonstrate an understanding of laws, regulations, and ethical concerns related to services for special needs students and regular education students relating to assessment and evaluation. Students will become proficient in communicating assessment data fluently through oral and written forms. Students will use information relating to child and adolescent development to develop instructional recommendations and ensure appropriate assessment application. Knowledge of Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks will be used to construct and evaluate authentic classroom assessment(s). Application of evaluative information to the IEP process will addressed as related to determination of special education eligibility criteria as outlined in Massachusetts and federal regulations and construction of IEP elements. Course participants will be proficient in the areas of: identifications of Specific Learning Disabilities using methodology outlined in current State regulations. Field experience is required.

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edu6609

The Professional Seminar I is designed in conjunction with the Professional Seminar II as a culminating requirement for Professional Teacher Licensure. The development of an individual teaching philosophy emerges from a review of philosophical and theoretical positions. The educator conducts a self-assessment of subject matter knowledge and pedagogical skills based on professional teaching standards. An assessment of student learning and achievement must use current local, district and state assessment data to identify area(s) of student need. This analysis will include sub-group populations within the teaching district to include ELL, special education, low economic students among others. An action research topic and professional development plan emerges from these analyses. The educator designs a plan for professional development in the identified area of need to prepare for the research project. A site visit from the college supervisor will facilitate this process.

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edu6547

This course involves a general study of the field of literature for children and adolescents in addition to promoting students’ love of reading. Research theory related to engaging struggling or reluctant readers and increasing accessibility to literature for English language learners will be reviewed and applied while working on projects. Critical criteria for selection of picture books, multi-cultural literature and books from different genre will be studied. Texts will be discussed in terms of genre, literary elements, author’s craft, cultural themes and integration into the curriculum. Foundation knowledge from EDC 498 and EDC 545 related to English language learners, struggling readers and writers, comprehension, vocabulary, and using assessment data to determine reading level will be applied when discussing all topics. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of pairing expository texts with fiction and embedding instruction in reading comprehension strategies while exploring literature. Multi-cultural curriculum projects will require students to use Universal Design and to synthesize knowledge gained in current and prior courses. 21st Century inquiry and technological skills will be employed while utilizing website and Web 2.0 tools to deepen K-12 students’ engagement with text.

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edu6551

This course is a survey of the general field of learning disabilities. It will include current theories, definitions, and exclusions in the diagnosis and treatment of learning disabilities. In-depth studies of the various constructs proposed by leaders in the field will be pursued.

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edu6511

The objective of this course will be to focus on the foundations of content literacy and the literacy design principles as they impact teaching practices and student learning. Participants will familiarize themselves with literacy practices which connect to the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. Participants will explore, analyze, and discuss literacy practices through a series of readings and written responses and observe model lessons taught in major content areas. Participants will interact as learners as they work together in a small group format to plan units and lessons. Participants will use literacy practices in connection with the local school district lesson development materials provided to guide and deepen their knowledge of the district curricula and to improve teacher effectiveness and student achievement.

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edu6486

This course will develop a basis for creating a personal theory of instruction through knowledge of brain functions, cognitive functions, learning styles, and motivation. Skill will be developed in the use of formal and informal measures for diagnosing problems, prescribing learning tasks, and generating corrective means for solving them.

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edu6345

This course prepares students to plan specific practical strategies for challenging and extending student writing, spelling, and grammar usage. Students will be training in utilizing data from writing assessments in order to better plan instruction for diverse learners and for promoting 21st Century critical thinking and research skills when reading and writing. Specific consideration will be paid to instructional methods that are effective for English language learners including use of technology and Web 2.0 tools. The relationship between reading, language and writing skill development will be studied. Universal Design will be utilized when planning instruction for a case study student. Effective approaches for standards-based writing instruction will be studied. Students will be encouraged to use specific web-resources to expand their knowledge of the needs of writers from all grade level and to use technological resources to motivate student writers.

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edu6460

This course gives the classroom teacher a working knowledge of technology resources for designing lessons that will enhance student achievement throughout the curriculum. The course will include training in word processing, spreadsheet software, database software, presentation software, and more. Using content from the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, participants will explore hands-on applications with a variety of computer hardware, including hand-held computers, laptops, workstations, and projection devices. Experiences in a fully electronic classroom will be included. Teachers will leave with a portfolio of valuable lessons, hotlinks, and other technology tools suitable for a full range of learning styles and needs.

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edu6330

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the field of learning disabilities and acquaint graduate students with the various concepts of learning disability and the changing and developing perspectives during the past 20 years. Included will be a review and evaluation of the evidence for the existence of a social learning disability and nonverballearning disabilities. The evidence for a neurological basis of learning disabilities is explored. Definitions and terms are introduced and discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the concept that a learning disability is not a single entity that will respond to a single remedial strategy, but exists rather as a multi-dimensional phenomenon basically occurring in the context of school-related tasks.

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edu5913

Students will analyze and critique current developments in research and theory in Science and Technology/Engineering content and pedagogy, and relate these changes to their population of practice and to broader changes in education. The course will emphasize the Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas published by the National Research Council. Pedagogical strategies, such as discourse, modeling, representation, scientific investigations, and engineering design will be emphasized as means to facilitate students’ conceptual development.

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edu6244

This course prepares students to assume responsibilities for literacy programs in K-12 diverse school districts. Study will include research-based approaches that will help literacy leaders train teachers and administrators to better meet the needs of English language learners, special education students and other diverse learners. Training in the development of effective differentiated professional development programs will include Universal Design curriculum development, 21st Century inquiry approaches and ways to maximize participants’ learning while working in study groups that analyze student work and data. Theory and training related to being an effective literacy supervisor, consultant, in-service trainer, coach and mentor will be utilized during case study work throughout the course. Effective methods for supporting school-wide literacy improvement, evaluating literacy programs and assessments and implementing RtI (Response to Intervention) will be presented. Use of technology will be required as part of the students’ final project.

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edu5725

A survey of current research and theories of literacy development will be presented. An in-depth study of scientifically-based instruction related to vocabulary, fluency and comprehension will be presented and the relationship between effective language and writing development and reading will be explored. This course provides the student with knowledge of significant programs and practices for teaching reading and language arts to diverse populations including English language learners, young children, adolescents and students with special needs. Students will gain proficiency in using specific reading strategies through modeling lessons and analyzing student work. Screening and diagnostic assessments will be used to identify specific strengths and weaknesses of struggling, proficient and advanced readers by analyzing and utilizing collected data. 21st Century inquiry approaches will be emphasized when teaching comprehension and writing connections and specific Web 2.0 tools will be recommended to aid remediation. The selection and use of appropriate programs, materials, and technology will be central to addressing the diverse needs in today’s classroom.

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edu5815

Through use of informal and formal assessments, students will learn how to effectively collect, analyze, and interpret data, as well as plan appropriate programs for diverse populations such as special needs students, English language learners and struggling readers. RtI, intervention approaches and progress monitoring strategies are studied in light of scientifically based reading research on effective literacy instructional practices for struggling readers. Training will include methods to evaluate and select the best literacy assessments to diagnose specific reading difficulties and ways to use technology to aid in data collection and analysis. While working on case studies, students will learn how to develop a hypothesis, develop assessment and progress monitoring plans and analyze data. Using Universal Design, students will create an instructional plan which includes a method to determine their students’ responses to intervention.

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edu5850

This course prepares students to assume literacy coaching responsibilities in a school. Research theory related to effective models for coaching teachers, school reform and professional development will be applied throughout the course as students plan literacy professional development modules designed to improve student achievement and teacher capacity to meet the needs of all learners.

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edu5703

This course provides an overview of literacy development for K-12 students. Current research related to the five components of reading and effective literacy instruction for English Language Learners (ELLs) will be reviewed. Potential impact of poverty on students’ readiness for learning to read will be discussed. Issues related to brain-based reading and language development and acquisition will be introduced. An in-depth study of scientifically-based instructional approaches and assessment practices related to phonological awareness, phonics and advanced decoding will be presented and will serve as the foundation for designing differentiated instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners. Students will be required to collect, analyze and interpret data for their case study students using specific literacy assessments appropriate for first and second English language learners. Using the Universal Design Model, students will develop an instructional plan for their case study students. 21st Century internet research approaches will be presented to hone students’ understanding of how to implement effective instruction for primary, elementary and adolescent readers.

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edu5715

Course materials relate to each of the components of reading and to the writing process. Research-based language and literacy instructional approaches will be studied. Stages of first and second language development will be presented and special attention will be paid to the needs of English language learners and diverse populations in relation to each of the elements of language (phonetics, morphology, semantics, syntax, discourse and pragmatics). Language-based disabilities will be studied in terms of their impact on literacy development. Assessment approaches will be presented as they relate to diagnostic techniques and remedial instructional strategies. Program development and evaluation will be discussed in terms of language and literacy components. Issues related to the historical roots of English and dialect will be explored in terms of their potential impact on student performance. Students will utilize recommended websites while studying language development and literacy connections. Using Universal Design methods, they will apply their newly gained knowledge as they develop instructional plans for students who need reading remediation due to language difficulties that relate to literacy.

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edu5669

As part of the SILO program, this is the 150-hour practicum for licensed teachers wishing to complete the requirements for an initial license in a new licensure field.

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edu5624

In an era of standards-based instruction, administrators must have a sound working knowledge of the principles of curriculum design, development, and implementation. Administrators must make important decisions regarding the content of curriculum, the selection of appropriate instructional materials, and the modification of teaching strategies to accommodate the needs of ALL learners. Educational Leaders must also be skilled in the ability to disseminate that information to the stakeholders in the educational community. This course will examine curriculum content, models of design, development, and implementation. Students will critically evaluate existing curricula and develop recommendations that respond to contemporary educational needs, new developments in knowledge and information, and new trends in teaching and learning. Significant elements of the Practicum experience will be infused throughout the course.

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edu5602

This course will expand upon the learning and applications that took place in EDC 601 – Introduction to School Administration and Management. The candidates will be able to utilize research skills and technology to gather data, analyze data and draw conclusions using the data to understand and solve educational issues. This will be the first phase of the seminar. The students will then apply the knowledge gained in the collection of data from EDC 601 to the work in this course for the development of an Entry Plan. The candidates will present their work to a target audience role played by the classmates. In this seminar fifty hours are embedded during which the candidates will be able to utilize their skills as a developing administrator to write an Entry Plan.

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edu5612

The essential question to be answered in this course is: What are the qualities and skills needed to become effective leaders? This course is for prospective administrators. Students will gain knowledge that will prepare them for the important role of change agents in a school or district. A critical examination is made of the typical organizational structures found in organizations today, especially in regards to leadership and ways in which the educational leader can facilitate meaningful change. This course specifically addresses Standard 1. Instructional Leadership and Standard 4. Professional Culture.

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edu5618

This course emphasizes the knowledge, skills, techniques and approaches needed by administrators to promote the growth of staff in ways leading to the establishment or continued development of a professional learning community. Leadership practices and strategies consistent with research on successful professional learning communities will be examined. Staff and student safety and well-being will be reviewed as one major component of a legally and ethically comprehensive professional development program. Laws, regulations, policies, practices and research will be examined with respect to enhancing school, family, and community relations, with a particular emphasis on practices leading to greater participation of all constituencies regardless of race, color, gender, religion, national origin, sexual orientation or disability. Field experiences will include the collection and review of data applicable to administrative leadership that is expected to lead to recommendations for modifications of teaching techniques and strategies to improve student achievement. The provision of appropriate programs for more fully addressing the educational experiences of English Language Learners and Special Education students will be reviewed and analyzed. Enrollment in graduate program in school leadership EDU5601

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edu5541

An introduction to basic issues of intercultural communication, with emphasis on their applicability to educators. Topics include: Communication and Intercultural Competence, Cultural Differences in Communication, Coding Intercultural Communication and Communicating in Intercultural Relationships. Relationships with students, parents and community stakeholders, as well as implications for learning and teaching expectations as they relate to cultural background will be explored.

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edu5601

The course is designed to provide the student with an introduction to the perspectives of elementary/middle/secondary school and central office administration and management, as well as historical and current theories and practices in the field. Readings, case studies, on-site visitations, analysis of current legislative reform and situational discourse are part of the course activities. State Curriculum Frameworks will be reviewed in light of Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment in a Learning Community. Coursework will reflect upon the Professional Standards for Administrators which are embedded in the course expectations and will be demonstrated in the pre-practicum/practicum experiences. The school administrator has many roles within the school community and the community at large. The person holding this position is expected to be knowledgeable about curriculum, instruction, and assessment, to be a leader with vision and the skills to work collaboratively with many different constituencies. In addition to those rigorous expectations, the administrator must successfully manage the day-to day operations of the building. School administrators must be knowledgeable about current legislative changes including the Education Reform Act of 1993 (MA); the federal ESEA / No Child Left Behind Law, 2001; Closing the Achievement Gap, (MA) 2010; Race To The Top Initiative. Significant elements of the pre-practicum experience will be infused throughout the course. Students will use readings, review of research, data collected from the field, case studies, class discussions, and personal reflections to analyze the work of the school administrator. The final project for the course will integrate the knowledge and skills acquired through EDC 601, Introduction to School Administration and Management for the 21st Century. This course requires 25 hours of Field Based/Pre-Practicum Experience through Observing and Assisting an administrator in his/her daily tasks up through the development of the Data Analysis Project.

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edu5540

This course will examine the basics of a multisensory, structured language curriculum for teaching reading, writing, spelling, comprehension and composition to diverse groups of students including those with reading problems, language disorders, cognitive disabilities, mild and moderate specific learning disabilities, and English Language Learners. There will be hands-on experience as well as exemplary lessons exploring best practice strategies to facilitate the development of reading and language skills. The students will learn how and where the sounds of English are made; how to introduce phonemic awareness activities; and how to teach sound-symbol associations in a logical, scientific way according to latest research. Students explore the qualities of children’s and adolescent literature, including the various genres, meaning, voices, and visual elements that are central to engaging learners through literature. Students will become proficient with regard to terminology relating to instructional standards and techniques in the areas of reading, written language, and content areas such as Science and Social Studies. They will become familiar with the use of identified best practice strategies for use in both specialized and the general education inclusive settings.

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edu5532

Like the SEI Teacher Endorsemtn course, the Short Bridge Endorsement Course focuses on current theories and evidence-based instructional practices related to the teaching of ELLs. This course is designed to promote continuous improvement in educator practice and to build teachers’ confidence and familiarity with research-proven practices for working with ELLs. Throughout the course, teachers have opportunities to practice effective, research-based strategies, to analyze their practice, to provide and receive feedback, and to reflect on their experiences. Though this cycle of reflective practice, teachers build on the skills, knowledge, and dispositions necessary for the education of English learners that they gained in the Category trainings. Assignments are designed to reinforce key concepts and practices. As participants proceed through the course, assignments will include a paper drawing on classroom data and information, classroom tryouts of modeled strategies which teachers will assess using a tool provided for the purpose; and the developement, implementation, and presentation of instructional segments. Throughout, participants will be asked to reflect upon the impact of the course material and activities on their practice.

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edu5533

The purpose of this course is to prepare the Commonwealth’s teachers with the knowledge and skills to effectively shelter their content instruction so that our growing population of English language learners (ELLs) can access curriculum, achieve academic success, and contribute their multilingual and multicultural resources as participants and future leaders in the 21st century global economy.

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edu5530

Prospective educators will examine theoretical and developmental models of mathematics instruction in order to plan and implement effective instruction based on the diverse cognitive, language, and developmental needs of students. Using technology to access national and local district assessment data, students will analyze and identify areas of need within the mathematics curriculum and engage in instructional decision-making. Demonstrations and micro-teaching will reference the Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Framework and the NCTM standards. Field experience is required.

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edu5520

A survey of theories, practices, and techniques of reading instruction for children in grades preK-8. Various methods and materials used in the teaching-learning process will be examined, including the informal diagnosis and assessment of reading skills. The Massachusetts English Language Arts Curriculum Frameworks, as well as related documents for English language learners and guidelines for special education students will be central to developing and presenting reading strategy lessons. Instructional accommodations for diverse learners will explore methods in sheltered English language immersion, special education, gifted and talented enrichment, and compensatory strategies for rural and urban poverty populations. Field work experiences and a diagnostic case-study assignment will integrate all course components. On-line research of the National Reading Panel Report and other professional sources will supplement course learning. Field experience is required.

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edu5523

This course is designed to give the students general knowledge of the typical course of development in children and adolescents in the major areas: physical, cognitive, and social-emotional. The ages from 3 to 21 will be the focus of the information provided in this course since teachers, school counselors, and school psychologists work within this age group primarily. The relative contribution of heredity and environment are considered when describing and explaining behavior. Specific focus is on the impact of early childhood education, poverty, abuse, and technology on development as well as on the educational process. Cultural, English language learning and socioeconomic factors are also addressed within the context of contemporary times.

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edu5410

The purpose of this course is to investigate developmental factors and influences that impact child growth and learning for the special needs child. The course will provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to identify those children who have special needs and study the ways and means that may be used to aid these children. Students will explore current early identification strategies and techniques as well as Response To Intervention (RTI) procedures used to facilitate struggling learners in the educational setting. State regulations (Chapt. 766) and Federal requirements (IDEA) will be covered in depth, as well as information about services provided and/or available to students by other agencies. An analysis of local/district/state data will be included. Students will acquire knowledge of how to use technology and assistive technology with special needs students and its curriculum implications. This includes Autism and Attention Deficit Disorder (w/wo hyperactivity). Course participants will gain an understanding of the educational problems which mild, moderated or severe handicaps imposes on a special needs child or youth and how this applies to the preparation and implementation of the Individual Educational Plan (IEP).

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edu5100

In an era of standards-based instruction, administrators must have a sound working knowledge of the principles of curriculum design, development, and implementation. Educational leaders will gain knowledge on how to make important decisions regarding the content of curriculum, the selection of appropriate instructional materials, and the modification of teaching strategies to accommodate the needs of ALL learners. 15 hours of pre-practicum fieldwork is required.

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edu5400

Candidates for initial teacher licensure will examine the dispositions, knowledge and skills of the 21st century educator. A study of American education will explore the historical, economic, and political trends underpinning our current approaches to instruction, curriculum and assessment. Diversity in the classroom and the implications for teaching students with special needs, English Language learners, and students from low income families will be studied. A related investigation of district-based demographic and assessment data will be conducted, followed by the analysis current practices, such as, inclusion, differentiated instruction, and response to intervention. The Common Core Curriculum Frameworks (MCF) will be incorporated into instructional mini-lesson demonstrations. A concentrated ELL module will develop in-depth understanding of the demographic, cultural, language and educational characteristics of these unique learners. Lesson plan development with instructional considerations for ELLs will align with ELL case study activities. Field experience required.

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edu5030

The course is designed to study the philosophical, sociological, historical, and psychological domains and basic issues facing education today by applying this knowledge to such issues as regular, vocational, business, technical, compensatory, and special education. Researching a current educational issue is required. Pre-practicum exercises are embedded within the assignments. 15 hours of pre-practicum fieldwork is required.

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edu5010

This course focuses on the elements of effective teaching: theories of learning, practical applications for educating all children, meeting the emotional needs of children, understanding the different learning styles, instructional planning, strategies for teaching, classroom management, and student assessment.

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edu4341

This course examines a full range of effective early childhood programs and curriculum. State curriculum documents, along with a variety of assessments, materials and teaching strategies are examined for their effectiveness in addressing the diverse cognitive, language, and developmental characteristics of young learners. Particular consideration is given to special needs of children with limited English proficiency, cognitive or language deficits, learning disabilities, economic or social disadvantage, etc. The administration and interpretation of informal and formal screening and evaluation procedures will be used to assess individual students. Assessment findings are used to plan instruction for young children with and without special needs.

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edu4320

This course addresses the developmental reading and language needs of the middle and high school student in the content area classroom spanning from “learning to read” to “reading to learn.” The strategic use of multiple texts, including 21st century technology literacies, will be presented using micro-teaching lessons to demonstrate effective practice. Using technology to access national and local assessment data, students will analyze and identify areas of need within the English language arts and their intended subject area to guide instructional decision-making. Instructional accommodations for diverse learners will explore methods in sheltered English language immersion, special education, gifted and talented enrichment, and compensatory strategies for rural and urban poverty populations. Field work experiences and a diagnostic case-study assignment will integrate all course components. On-line research of the National Reading Panel Report and other professional sources will be integral to course learning. Field experience is required.

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edu4302

This course will examine the basics of a multisensory, structured language curriculum for teaching reading, writing, spelling, comprehension and composition to diverse groups of students including those with reading problems, language disorders, cognitive disabilities, mild and moderate specific learning disabilities, and English Language Learners. There will be hands-on experience as well as exemplary lessons exploring best practice strategies to facilitate the development of reading and language skills. The students will learn how and where the sounds of English are made; how to introduce phonemic awareness activities; and how to teach sound-symbol associations in a logical, scientific way according to latest research. Students explore the qualities of children’s and adolescent literature, including the various genres, meaning, voices, and visual elements that are central to engaging learners through literature. Students will become proficient with regard to terminology relating to instructional standards and techniques in the areas of reading, written language, and content areas such as Science and Social Studies. They will become familiar with the use of identified best practice strategies for use in both specialized and the general education inclusive settings.

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edu4311

This course provides a study of secondary and middle mathematics curricula and various methods for planning instruction for all learners and evaluation in the classroom. A survey of current textbooks, instructional materials, and testing materials will be included. Changes and developments in the area of teaching mathematics will be addressed utilizing the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and current professional literature. Field experience is required.

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edu4301

Prospective educators will examine theoretical and developmental models of mathematics instruction in order to plan and implement effective instruction based on the diverse cognitive, language, and developmental needs of students. Using technology to access national and local district assessment data, students will analyze and identify areas of need within the mathematics curriculum and engage in instructional decision-making. Demonstrations and micro-teaching will reference the Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Framework. Field experiences are required for initial licensure.

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edu4300

A survey of theories, practices, and techniques of reading instruction for children in grades preK-8. Various methods and materials used in the teaching-learning process will be examined, including the informal diagnosis and assessment of reading skills. The Massachusetts English Language Arts Curriculum Frameworks, as well as related documents for English language learners and guidelines for special education students will be central to developing and presenting reading strategy lessons. Instructional accommodations for diverse learners will explore methods in sheltered English language immersion, special education, gifted and talented enrichment, and compensatory strategies for rural and urban poverty populations. Field work experiences and a diagnostic case-study assignment will integrate all course components. On-line research of the National Reading Panel Report and other professional sources will supplement course learning. Field experience is required.

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edu3210

This course is an introduction to the study of the child from conception to the onset of adolescence. Basic concepts of child development, especially those related to learning and social development are stressed, with special emphasis on pre-school and kindergarten age groups.

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edu3321

The purpose of this course is to investigate developmental factors and influences that impact child growth and learning for the special needs child. The course will provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to identify those children who have special needs and study the ways and means that may be used to aid these children. Students will explore current early identification strategies and techniques as well as Response To Intervention (RTI) procedures used to facilitate struggling learners in the educational setting. State regulations (Chapt. 766) and Federal requirements (IDEA) will be covered in depth, as well as information about services provided and/or available to students by other agencies. An analysis of local/district/state data will be included. Students will acquire knowledge of how to use technology and assistive technology with special needs students and its curriculum implications. This includes Autism and Attention Deficit Disorder (w/wo hyperactivity). Course participants will gain an understanding of the educational problems which mild, moderated or severe handicaps imposes on a special needs child or youth and how this applies to the preparation and implementation of the Individual Educational Plan (IEP).

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edu3201

An introduction to teaching that examines the dispositions, knowledge and skills of the 21st century educator. An overview of American education will focus on historical and contemporary trends in teaching, learning, and curriculum. Diversity in American classrooms, including students with special needs, limited English proficiency, economic or social disadvantage, gifted and talented, etc., will be examined in keeping with current practices such as, inclusion, differentiated instruction, ELL support, and response to intervention. Students will engage in initial lesson plan construction selecting topics in science, Massachusetts geography and social studies. Reference to the principles and learning standards of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks (CCSS) is required. Field experience required.

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edu3200

An introduction to teaching that examines the dispositions, knowledge and skills of the 21st century educator. An overview of American education will focus on historical and contemporary trends in teaching, learning, and curriculum. Diversity in American classrooms, including students with special needs, limited English proficiency, economic or social disadvantage, gifted and talented, etc., will be examined in keeping with current practices such as, inclusion, differentiated instruction, ELL support, and response to intervention. Students will engage in initial lesson plan construction selecting topics in science, Massachusetts geography and social studies. Reference to the principles and learning standards of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks (CCSS) is required. Field experience required.

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edu2102

A one-credit course offered for sophomores (and junior transfer students) in the fall for undergrad Education minors. This course is designed to introduce students to public school settings in suburban and rural locations. Partnerships are established with five school districts and students will take fieldtrips to the various locations for classroom observations (early pre-practicum fieldwork). A lab fee will be charged to cover transportation costs.

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edu2103

The MTEL preparatory course is a seven-week, one-credit course that prepares students for the communication and literacy portion of the Massachusetts Test for Educator Licensure (MTEL). While the course focuses on writing, reading, and the various types of MTEL questions, emphasis is placed on writing fundamentals (grammar, mechanics, punctuation) and on reading comprehension. Students write and edit essays, read and summarize passages, learn test-taking strategies, and take practice exams. Students take the Communication and Literacy MTELs at the conclusion of the course. Lab fee is charged.

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eco5234

This course presents an economic analysis of the revenue and expenditure activities of governments. Emphasis is placed on the effects of government policies of expenditure, budget, and debt on the performance of the economy.

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eco5000

Topics include essentials of microeconomics and macroeconomics as an explanation of how contemporary free enterprise systems function. Students will also learn about the development of an understanding of major concepts, and their analysis and relevance to the real world of economic activity.

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eco5210

This course reviews major topics in microeconomics in combination with recent mathematical developments examined as aids to the decision maker in the solution of problems faced by both public and private enterprise. It introduces to the student to an analysis of demand, supply cost, prices and market structure from the point of view of the firm and the industry operating in a mixed enterprise system. The principles of intelligent economic planning involving the determination of the most economical combination of productive inputs and outputs are examined in detail.

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eco4200

The course introduces the student to the practice of economic reasoning in the solution of real world managerial decision problems. In addition to developing the theoretical and analytical tools of economic decision making, this course enables students to develop judgment skills required in the application of managerial economics. Emphasis is placed on the use and application of economic analysis in clarifying problems, in organizing and evaluating information, and in comparing alternative courses of action.

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eco4220

The purpose of this course is to introduce the theory and practice of econometric analysis to undergraduate students. Topics include basic probability theory and statistics, distribution theory, estimation and inference, bivariate regression, introduction to multivariate regression, introduction to statistical computing (using Excel).

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eco3800

This course covers a study of the forces causing fluctuations in business activity. Possible devices to stabilize the economy will be explored. Also, the course will explore ways used by economists to attempt to predict the level of economic activity.

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eco3810

This course presents an introduction to the economic analysis of the revenue and expenditure activities of governments. Emphasis is placed on the effects of government policies of expenditure, budget, and debt on the performance of the economy.

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eco3500

The purpose of this course is to analyze a set of challenges that developing countries experience today, and the successes and failures of programs designed to address these challenges. Topics include health, nutrition, education, inequality, land reform, gender, corruption and infrastructure development.

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eco3430

This course conducts a thorough study of the effects of monetary management upon economic activity in theory and practice. Recent developments in central banking policy are examined. In addition, the interdependence of financial markets, the implications of U. S. Federal Reserve policy for domestic and foreign economic activity, and the effect of government debt policy are discussed.

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eco3300

This course covers the theory and applications of the economics of urban areas and regional forces. The importance of economic factors working to shape the physical environment is emphasized, using modern tools of economic analysis in an applied setting, with special emphasis on the Springfield area and New England in historical and modern contexts. Case studies of urban economic growth, urban planning, urban renewal, and financing of urban services are discussed.

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eco3320

This course presents a study of the most important individuals in the development of modern economic thought. Both early and contemporary economists will be discussed, and their specific contributions will be related to current economic theory and practice.

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eco3210

This course allows the student an opportunity to develop a thorough understanding of the macroeconomy through an analysis of the effects of fiscal and monetary policy on aggregate output, interest rates, the price level, and inflation in the domestic economy and abroad. Special emphasis is placed on recent U. S. experience with inflation and unemployment, and several new proposals designed to counter cyclical behavior and stagnant growth in the mature U. S. economy.

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eco3250

This course is designed to develop comprehensive understanding of the economics of such political environments as communism, Marxism, modern socialism, fascism, and market-directed socialism. The economic systems of selected emerging countries are discussed, including the modern Russian and Eastern European economy, China, and Cuba. Comparisons are drawn with modern mixed-capitalist economic systems in the U. S., Japan, and Hong Kong and selected countries in Western Europe.

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eco2600

This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of general theory and practice, with emphasis upon those principles common to all special fields: property, life, disability, liability, workers’ compensation, fidelity, and automobile insurance. Accounting majors may take this course for economics credit.

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eco2613

This course provides the student with an opportunity to develop a thorough analysis of demand, supply, production and cost relationships, monopoly, competition, oligopoly, labor markets, and the operation of industry in the modern American economy. Individual decisions of consumption, production, and labor supply are emphasized.

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eco3200

The course presents the essentials of money and banking with special reference to developments of recent years. Balanced emphasis upon both theoretical and practical aspects of the subject is the basis for interpretation of problems such as inflation, recession, the interest rate structure, and national debt.

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eco2440

This course examines the existence and impact of concentration of economic power in the U. S. business community, and the role of the public sector in the control of influence of concentration. Special emphasis will be placed on legislative enactments, judicial enforcement of antitrust law, and the impact of government regulation on the dispersion and decentralization of economic power and influence.

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eco2480

This course allows students to apply economic knowledge and reasoning to a wide variety of important issues. Both domestic and international topics of major importance can be considered; for example, urban decay, pollution, the re-industrialization of American industry, women in the workforce, international conflict resolution through trade, and the history of minorities in U. S. economic development.

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eco2420

This course is a survey of U. S. economic history from its colonial beginnings to the present, with emphasis on the interaction of economic forces and historical development. Basic economic innovations, ranging from the utilization of unique forms of U. S. transportation to the innovative American system of manufacturing, will be analyzed. The importance of immigration policy and the status of minorities in the development of the American economy will also be examined.

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eco1402

This course examines individual decision making in various applied economic environments. Areas of application include international trade, market structures, labor markets, and various U. S. institutional environments, both public and private. Basic emphasis is on the microeconomic approach.

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eco2210

This course studies the economic principles of labor markets, and human resource economics. Issues concerning labor supply and demand, wage differentials, the role of education, investment in human capital, unemployment, discrimination, income inequality, and labor unions are discussed, with emphasis on application to the U. S. institutional framework.

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eco2400

This course provides an analysis of economic relationships among countries, including studies of the balance of payments, the international currency system, government adjustment policies, the pure theory of international trade, and international financial markets, as well as an examination of recent issues of national industrial trends towards protectionism.

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eco1010

The course provides a systematic framework for understanding the contemporary world that we now live in. It is a world of interconnecting countries possessing special combinations of natural, cultural, social, political, and economic environments. The course will help the student to develop an appreciation of these countries and their individual impact on the rest of the world. This will lead to a better understanding of not only the old world order but, more importantly, the new world now evolving. The course breaks the world down into 12 geographical realms, each of which will be reviewed in detail.

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eco1401

This course is devoted to the study of the fundamental principles and processes of an economic system, with special emphasis on the coordination and control of the United States economy. Emphasis is on the macroeconomic approach.

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eco1000

This is a survey course developed for the non-economic and non-business school major, designed to explore in a non-technical manner economic issues of importance to both the macro and micro economy. Potential topics to be covered include: an examination of the workings of a market system, inflation, economic growth, unemployment, fiscal and monetary policy, international trade, consumer demand, market structure and firm theory, income distribution and poverty, and antitrust, agricultural, and environmental policies.

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crj5610

This course looks at the behavior of people in the system and seeks to help students better understand their own values and behaviors. Coverage will include the behaviors of professionals in the courts, corrections, law enforcement, probation, and parole. An important segment of the course will deal with causes of criminal behavior especially as to the causes of child abuse, domestic violence, and rape.

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crj5660

This course examines the impact of drugs and alcohol use/abuse on individual, society and the criminal justice system. The course will focus on various categories of abusable substances, their physical and psychological effects, and the continuum of treatment modalities used in combating chemical dependency. Since drug and alcohol use account for the single largest category of criminal arrests and convictions in the United States, specific focus will be on the criminal justice’s responses to drug/alcohol related crimes: law enforcement, innovative treatment approaches and drug testing technologies.

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crj5510

The course is designed to give an overview of legal principles, which provide a framework for the criminal justice system. An analysis of cases and statutes, pertinent to areas under consideration, is emphasized together with instruction in fundamental aspects of legal research. Areas covered include investigation, initial appearance, arraignment, preliminary examination, trial, guilty pleas or conviction, sentence, and release.

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crj5310

An examination of domestic violence and its interaction with the criminal justice system. Areas of focus include causative factors, legal issues, substance abuse correlations, and victim advocate and behavior modification programs. Particular emphasis will be placed on in-depth chronic offender profiles.

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crj5410

This course is designed to explore various ethical dilemmas facing the criminal justice professional. The content will focus on applying various theories of moral decision making, including moral rationalism, utilitarianism, and Kant’s categorical imperative to hypothetical situations confronting the criminal justice practitioner.

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crj5420

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of counseling theory and specific skills as they relate to criminal justice professionals. The focus will be on the use of these skills with offenders who have been referred to agencies as an alternative to incarceration. Emphasis will be placed on rapport development, listening skills, and communication skills. Consideration will be given to problem-solving strategies, decision making, and stress management. Some attention will be given to a review of vocational tests and interest inventories with emphasis on proper interpretation and use of results.

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crj4979

This meets the requirement as a writing intensive course in the major. A supervised work experience for majors in criminal justice. Students will have the opportunity to observe professionals in action and to take part in the activities of the agency, thereby utilizing and improving skills learned through that observation along with those from classroom study.

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crj5240

An in-depth look at the juvenile justice system from its historical origins to current practices. Special emphasis is placed on juvenile justice terminology, landmark legal cases and procedures used with juveniles and their families.

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crj4880

An individualized program of reading, library research, and interviewing, under direction of a faculty member.

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crj4539

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of counseling theory and specific skills as they relate to criminal justice professionals. The focus will be on the use of these skills with offenders who have been referred to agencies as an alternative to incarceration. Emphasis will be placed on rapport development, listening skills, and communication skills. Consideration will be given to problem-solving strategies, decision making and stress management. Some attention will be given to a review of vocational tests and interest inventories with emphasis on proper interpretation and use of results.

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crj4860

This meets the requirement as a writing intensive course in the major. A course designed as a culminating experience for criminal justice majors. Students will be involved in library research and discussion of critical aspects of the criminal justice system. Position papers on various questions will be prepared, presented, and defended in the course of the semester.

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crj4438

This course looks at the behavior of people in the system and seeks to help students better understand their own values and behavior. Coverage will include the impact of roles played by people in courts, corrections, law enforcement, probation, parole, and rehabilitation. An important segment will deal with the developing use of hypnosis in recall enhancement. As time permits, issues such as child abuse and rape will be included.

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crj3842

This course examines the nature and complexity of crime as a social problem. The measurement, techniques of data collection, and patterns of crime are explored as well as various classical, biological, psychological, and sociological theories of crime causation. Throughout the course, policy implications of the content matter will be considered.

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crj3844

The ethics curriculum is designed to further the goals of professionalization of the criminal justice system. The course is designed to lay a foundation for our students to better make moral decisions as they face inevitable ethical dilemmas as practitioners in the field of criminal justice. Students will first be required to analyze various theories of moral decision making, including, but not limited to, the theories of moral imperativism and utilitarianism. Throughout the semester, students will be applying these theories to practical situations. This will be accomplished by presenting hypotheticals to the class, and requiring the class to analyze the hypotheticals individually and in-group discussions.

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crj3636

A course designed to explore the interpersonal expectations and relationships between criminal justice practitioners and community members. The content will focus on basic psychological and sociological principles (including attitudes, perception, self-image, stereotypes, subcultures, and rumor), as well as discretion, and their application to the interaction between criminal justice practitioners and community members.

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crj3641

This meets the requirement as a writing intensive course in the major. This course compares the U. S. criminal justice system with selected foreign systems. A cross-cultural overview will study the nature, theories, and mechanisms for fighting crime and dealing with criminals in different societies. An end goal will attempt to discover innovative ways that may deal with crime in the United States.

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crj3632

A course designed to explore the roles of women in the system. Study will focus on the theories and myths about women as criminals, as victims, and as criminal justice professionals.

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crj3520

The course will introduce the student to basic criminal investigation theories and techniques. The development of contemporary criminal investigation and criminalistics will be examined, as well as crime specific investigative technology.

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crj3530

This course focuses on the plight of victims and witnesses of crime from legal, social, and psychological perspectives. Topics include the history of victimology, victim experiences, victim’s rights, and official criminal justice system responses to victims and witnesses. Restorative justice concepts are explored throughout this study.

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crj3441

This course explores the body of written law that defines crimes and specifies punishment. Substantive criminal law emphasizes the nature, history, and purpose of criminal law; its constitutional limits; general principles of criminal liability; the defenses of justification and excuse; and the specific elements of crimes.

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crj2451

The course is designed to give an overview of legal principles, which provide a framework for the criminal justice system. An analysis of cases and statutes, pertinent to areas under consideration, is emphasized together with a coverage of fundamental aspects of legal research. Areas covered include investigation, initial appearance, arraignment, preliminary examination, trial, guilty pleas or conviction, sentence, and release.

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crj3240

This course examines the rights of those accused of criminal wrongdoing, from the time they become suspects, through incarceration. Topics covered include issues surrounding search and seizure, right of counsel, right against self-incrimination, use of force, right to medical treatment, sentencing guidelines, identification procedures, and protection from cruel and unusual punishment. Additionally, topics include court rules governing trial procedures and the roles the defense and prosecuting attorneys play in the adjudication of criminal cases.

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crj3434

An examination of domestic violence and its interaction with the criminal justice system. Areas of focus include causative factors, legal issues, substance abuse correlations, victim advocates, and behavior modification programs. Particular emphasis will be placed on in-depth chronic offender profiles.

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crj2350

This course introduces students to scientific methodology as it is related to criminal justice, in order for students to become sophisticated research consumers and producers. This course provides students with an understanding of the methods of research available to criminologists, the connection between theory and data, and the ability to comprehend the logic behind statistical tests of significance. Understanding the development and testing of hypotheses, data collection, data analysis, and presentation of findings according to professional standards is the underlying theme of the course.

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crj2421

An in-depth look at the juvenile justice system from its historical origins to current practices. Special emphasis is placed on juvenile justice terminology, landmark legal cases, and procedures used with juveniles and their families.

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crj2426

This meets the requirement as a writing intensive course in the major. The course examines the development and professional practice of federal and state probation and parole systems. Emphasis is placed on organization, roles, and responsibilities of these systems, as well as the significant impact of court decisions on delivery of services.

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crj2302

This course is an introduction to statistical methods as they are used in the social sciences. Both descriptive and inferential statistics are covered, including sampling, probability, and hypothesis testing. Specific parametric and non-parametric analyses include analysis of variance, the t-test, Chi-square, and correlation.

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crj2322

This course presents an overview of the development of law enforcement within the criminal justice system. Study and discussions will focus on such topics as roles and responsibilities, departmental organization, and in-depth consideration of the law enforcement functions associated with modern enforcement agencies.

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crj2224

This meets the requirement as a writing intensive course in the major. An overview of the correctional system. Topics for study and discussion include historical development, theories of punishment, sentencing structures, the functions of different types of institutions, management techniques, and problems in today’s correctional operations.

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crj2295

This course examines the impact of drugs and alcohol use and abuse on the individual, society, and criminal justice system. The course will focus on the various categories of abusable substances, their physical and psychological effects, and the continuum of treatment modalities used in combating chemical dependency. Because drug and alcohol use account for the single largest category of criminal arrests and convictions in the U. S., specific focus will be on the criminal justice system’s responses to drug and alcohol related crimes; law enforcement; innovative treatment approaches; and drug testing technologies.

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crj1400

An introductory survey course designed to provide the student with an overview of the system. Theories of criminal behavior, criminal law, and procedures are introduced and studied as they apply to the criminal justice components of law enforcement, the courts, and corrections.

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com4470

Development of radio and television scripts and storyboards for advertising and promotional commercials. Research data and information for assignments provided by national TV and radio industry sources. Students will gain experience using accepted commercial formats and prepare broadcast “spots” that comply with professional standards and contemporary practice. Student teams will prepare television/radio campaigns for national brands. Students will also conduct audience research to identify targeted demographics and underlying social attitudes using national research such as NORC. Laboratory fee charged.

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com4899

One of the strengths of the communication program is the close relationship the program enjoys with the local, regional, and national media. Communication students are required to take at least three credits of professional learning experience in the media and are encouraged to take as many as 12 credits. Students document their professional learning through a compilation of published stories, radio air checks, and television demo tapes; this, combined with their resume and a practice interview, are the basis of the student capstone learning experience in communication. Students have completed internships at 91.9, WAIC, WWLP TV-22, WGGB TV-40, WAQY Rock 102, WHDH and WBZ in Boston, and NY1 in New York City. Summer internships can be arranged so that students continue their professional growth during recess, and the program already has a proud record of graduates being placed in media jobs.

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com4400

This course is an upper level seminar focused on emerging communication technologies and their potential applications. Students will engage in self-driven investigations of emergent technologies and their attendant social consequences. Students will use research tools such as secondary analysis of social surveys, interviews, focus groups, and experiments to develop presentations, debates, and discussions centered on the increasing significance of communication technologies in modern life as well as concerns about dependence on and access to theses technologies.

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com3695

Periodically, the department offers special seminars in specific timely subject areas. Typically, these are film courses that focus on a special topic such as Independent Films, Documentaries and Film Noire. Although other seminars have been offered from African Music to Women’s issues. Students can take different seminars for credit.

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com3830

This course provides an introduction to the convergence of video, audio and computers and wireless and other transmission methods. The course covers the technical and creative aspects of digital video photography, editing and sound, emphasizing the potential of multiple platform presentation including television, cable, video on demand, the web and fixed and emerging media. Compression, non-linear editing, burning to media such as DVD or CD and developing seamless interfaces are also taught. Laboratory fee charged.

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com3682

Expanding on the theoretical background provided in COM1281, the students will consider current topics in mass media effects such as violence, mean world syndrome, gender and race portrayals, the breakdown of regional diversity in the 3623U. S., and international media trends. In addition to the dominant role played by television in contemporary American society, emerging technologies such as the Internet and interactive media will be explored.

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com3662

This course will give students hands-on experience in the design and production of newspapers, newsletters and magazines. In addition to the basics of layout and design, desktop publishing, headline writing and the selections of graphics and images for publication will be discussed.

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com3670

Students will create, write, produce and edit video content for television and the web.

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com3680

This course explains the basic concepts of media research. Included are measurement and methodologies for measuring the effectiveness and impact of mass mediated messages (from radio, newspaper and TV to web site hits). Recognition tests, recall and association tests, opinions and attitude ratings, projectile methods, laboratory testing, and content analysis are each explained and studied. Research applications focus mainly, but not entirely, on consumers of mass media. Quantitative as well as qualitative methods are discussed in detail.

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com3661

Building on the skills learned in COM1212, students will write, produce and edit short narrative films, documentaries and feature length, broadcast quality video productions.

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com3650

This course introduces a model of the IMC (integrated marketing communications) planning process and the steps taken in developing a marketing communications program. Research-based examinations of organizations needs for programs that can meet the global challenges and their impact. Promotions Management, Communication Process, and Ethical Issues will be discussed.

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com3660

Expanding upon the basic video skills learned in COM3661, students will produce television news segments. Special emphasis will be placed on news judgment, script writing, production values such as sound and lighting, and the use of maps, graphics and video footage to enhance reportage. Students will gain practical experience behind and in front of the camera in the College’s state-of-the-art digital television production facility. Students will learn how to direct and produce television news segments, write scripts and, ultimately, produce a half-hour television news broadcast. Laboratory fee charged.

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com3623

This course acquaints students with the sports marketing field, with emphasis on marketing mix and basic marketing functions as they apply to the sports industry. Specific strategies in sports promotion, sporting goods, and health and fitness markets are explored.

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com3631

An advanced course in targeting music programming to specific demographic groups. Student will assess actual and hypothetical markets, target opportunities for new stations and using Pandora, actually create a new radio station with promos, liners and a music play list based on the audience research and listenership goals. Students will gain experience interpreting ratings.

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com3632

An advanced course in targeting broadcast news and informational programming to specific demographic groups. Student will assess actual and hypothetical markets, target opportunities for new programs and develop research based pitches for their programming projects. Laboratory fee charged.

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com3600

The department offers a wide range of special interest seminars on topics in Communication ranging from African roots in contemporary music to the role of Women in media.

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com3601

The department offers a wide range of special interest seminars on topics in Communication ranging from African roots in contemporary music to the role of Women in media.

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com3493

The cinema has emerged as one of the most powerful socializing forces in modern society. This survey course traces the development of modern film in the 20th Century.

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com3500

Students will learn to critique television, film, theater, music, dance, art and photography. Students will review plays, movies and television programs or other art and entertainment forms each week, developing the skills needed to write professional reviews. In addition to learning the necessary terminology, print and media reviews will be analyzed.

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com3492

This course considers the idea that media is a teacher of social ideas and behavior. Specifically considered in this course is the presentation of Italian-Americans in gangster films ranging from Public Enemy to the Godfather series. Other genres of film, Nature films for example, may also be offered if they consider the topic of representation in film.

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com3411

This course is and advanced level course for students who want to pursue in-depth photography projects. The interdisciplinary projects combine image making with areas of student academic focus. The projects often include documenting comminity activities and organizations. Final work will be presented in a variety of digital and analog formats. Lab fee charge.

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com3461

Students will learn how to find news stories, cover the issues and present the results. From creating single images with captions to photo-essays with text, students will combine the disciplines of photography and journalism to become visual storytellers. Ethics, integrity and accuracy will be emphasized, along with creating content for The Yellow Jacket. Lab fee charged.

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com3462

This course cultivates the development of a student’s personal photographic style. Students will consciously explore a range of genres, such as nature photography, abstract photography, commercial photography and landscape photography. Students will also investigate a variety of tools, ranging from shooting film to using studio lighting. Culminating projects that benefit the college community will be created. Lab fee charged.

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com3410

This course presupposes the student’s ability to write clear and concise stories of publishable quality under deadline pressure. Topics covered include the elements of a good sports story, newspaper, television and radio coverage, and developing sources of sports information. Topical sports issues such as salary caps, women’s sports, and pseudo-sports such as the WWF will be discussed. Students will also explore participatory sports such as fishing and are free to pursue their own sports interests in print and broadcast media.

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com3402

Students learn how to research and write investigative journalistic pieces. Particular attention will be paid to sources, public records and global searches, as well as privacy and ethical issues. Students will be required to write a lengthy investigative reporting project.

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com3403

This course is an introduction to writing the various journalistic forms that express personal opinions, including news analysis editorials and personal opinion columns. Current examples from local and national press will be discussed.

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com3400

Students will learn the basics of managing a commercial radio station. Among the topics to be covered will be traffic, promotions, programming and ratings and administration of various radio station departments.

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com3401

Students will learn to write feature stories for newspapers and magazines. In addition to learning the elements of good feature writing, this course shows how to take story ideas and turn them into published articles for newspapers, magazines and literary journals. Current feature stories will be discussed.

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com3290

One approach to cinematic studies is to consider the films of certain recognized great directors. Among the directors to be considered in this course are Alfred Hitchcock, Spike Lee and Francois Truffaut.

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com3260

This course will teach students how to write screenplays. Topics covered include plot and story development, concept, and character. Students will be required to complete the first act of a feature length screenplay as part of their course work. Other topics include writing for television and marketing screenplays.

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com3261

Digital multimedia projects in mass communication will be developed from among advertising, journalism, public relations, radio and television genres. The purpose of this course is for students to produce multimedia projects. In the process, students will use their individual writing, reporting, photographic and audio/video skills to develop a concept, produce separate elements and finally assemble the project. This project, whether burned to a DVD or posted on the web, will include text, graphics, photos, audio and video. Laboratory fee charged.

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com3280

This course studies major theorists in interpersonal communication. The course establishes communication as the process by which individuals define themselves and by which they are defined. Focus will be on such theorists as Sapir, Worf, Phillipsen and Hymes.

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com3201

Students will explore theories of Public Opinion, Mass Communication and Audience Research and apply that learning toward creating targeted messages in media such as print, direct mail, broadcast and cable television, web and mobile phone applications.

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com3202

Emphasis is placed on practical use of advertising in the operation of the ordinary business, including the study of the various media available and their use. Sufficient time is spent on the role of advertising in the marketing mix and its effects upon our economy. Included is the study of the fundamentals of advertising creation: research, appeals, copy, illustration, layout, and reproduction. A study of the advertising agency includes analyses of current advertising campaigns and types of media chosen for such campaigns.

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com3240

This course covers the rights and responsibilities of mass media practitioners such as reporters, editor, etc., as well as the impact of conglomeration on mass media. This course looks at the values of those who work in the news business and the moral dilemmas they face in an increasingly complex and litigious society. The course includes lectures, case studies and guest speakers. Topics covere include privacy and an overview of libel law and the impact of conglomeration on the news business in general.

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com3200

In this course, the basis of our study is comprised of the careful viewing and detailed intensive analysis of five (5) contemporary American classics. Students analyze technique and content, as well as artistic vision, linking dramatic action to technical elements that define film as an art form.

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com2870

This course examines television comedy with an emphasis on writing scripts for half hour sitcoms and shorter format comedies.

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com2890

This course addresses critical issues in sports media in a number of different collegiate sports. Students will discuss the differences between sport and mediated sport and the symbiotic relationship between sport and media. Students participate in college sports web casts and broadcasts operating cameras, editing clips and telescopes, creating dynamic audience driven promotions and understanding the relationship between communities of fans and conventional and new media. In their final project, the student will be required to plan, produce and deliver a professional sports broadcast and/or webcast. Laboratory fee charged.

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com2840

A production course that focuses on social aspects of Internet communication and the implications of digital media on the World Wide Web. Students explore the history, structure, function and social impact of the Internet and the web. Students will critique web sites, learn Hypertext Markup Language and other appropriate codes, construct simple web pages and integrate multimedia and streaming media into their websites.

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com2630

An introduction to the basic principles and techniques of writing for the media. Formats include informational, persuasive and entertainment content for a variety of audiences across multi-media – traditional media like radio, TV and print as well as web sites, bulletin boards and even e-mail and text messages. Students will write copy for news (print and broadcast), the web, advertising, public relations, television and the screen as well as personal and professional correspondence.

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com2503

This laboratory is designed to facilitate hands-on training using various forms of media technology. This lab will support department efforts related to non-traditional media outlets. This course may be taken three times.

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com2603

Students sharpen their public speaking and radio and television speaking skills using digital audio technology. Students participate in a range of activities from simple ‘stand ups’ in videos, newscasts for radio and television and even doing play by play or color for the over 100 webcasts of AIC sporting events the department produces each year.

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com2500

Students will learn the skills necessary to produce editions of the college newspaper (bi-monthly) as well as additional publications including the Criterion literary magazine, print flyers and advertising utilizing the Mac In Design package which includes Photoshop, In Design (lay out and design) and other graphic applications. This course would be required for students working on the Yellow Jacket.

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com2501

Students will learn the skills necessary to produce television and other video projects at professional standards. The college is aggressively pursuing opportunities to broadcast and/or cablecast college events ranging from sports, campus events, video on demand, as well as developing additional TV content. Students will participate in these projects as videographers, writers, editors, directors, and lighting and sound technicians. No more than 3 credits of tis course may be applied towards the Communication or New Media Major.

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com2502

Students will learn the skills necessary to produce professional quality radio programming including production values, building personality through bumpers, liners and station IDs; as well as practice in digital audio editing.

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com2402

This course provides students with the production techniques and programming applications necessary to work at a news/talk/sports broadcasting. In addition to learning different news, sports and talk formats, students will gain hands-on experience on the air at 91.9 WAIC. Student training includes writing and producing programming using state-of-the-art digital audio editing systems. Students will also participate in live AIC Sports and Talk programming.

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com2411

This course builds on and deepens work with the fundamental visual art principles introduced in Digital Photography I. Students will employ advanced techniques using digital cameras and the college’s digital darkroom (Adobe Photoshop). Students will enhance their online portfolios, as well as create hands-on communication projects that benefit the college community. The framework for analyzing and evaluating images will be expanded.

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com2460

This course is a survey of photojournalism, tracing the development from Civil War origins to contemporary practice. Changes in photographic technology and the resulting impact on the craft will be examined. Students will discuss the role of photojournalists who record history in a society built on images.

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com2401

This course provides students with the production techniques and programming applications necessary to work at a music radio station. In addition to learning different music programming formats, students will gain hands-on experience on the air at 91.9 WAIC. Student training includes writing and producing station liners, stagers and positioning statements using state of the art digital audio editing systems, producing live broadcasts and phone drops, as well as discussion of taste and sensibility issues, FCC requirements, interpreting ratings data and developing an on-air personality.

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com2200

This course will provide students with the foundational knowledge and skills in the use of library resources and common computer tools. It will be broad enough in scope to enable students to continue learning independently as well as to build discipline-related knowledge and skills both within and beyond the college curriculum. Legal and ethical considerations will be addressed.

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com2220

An appreciation and examination through lecture and discussion of classic science fiction, horror and supernatural/occult films. Will focus on legendary directors, actors, composers and special effects technicians from the 1920’s through recent release. Screened films will include: ‘The Lost World’ (1925), ‘King Kong’ (1933), James Whale’s ‘Frankenstein’ (1931), ‘The Invisible Man’ (1933), Todd Browning’s ‘Dracula’ (1931), and ‘Freaks’ (1932), ‘Nosferatu’ (1922), ‘The Thing’ and ‘The Day the Earth Stood Still’ (both 1950’s), ‘The Ghost and Mrs. Muir’ and ‘Blithe Spirit’ (both 1940’s), ‘M’ (1931), ‘The Cabinet of Dr Caligari’ (1919), ‘Rosemary’s Baby’ (1968), The British classic thrillers, ‘Rebecca’ (1940) and ‘Dead of Night’ (1945) and ‘Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde’ with Barrymore, March or Tracey.

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com1400

The Communication Department programs and operates 91.9 WAIC FM as a learning laboratory for our students. This course provides an overview of the broadcasting business and provides training in various aspects of broadcasting, including scheduling, traffic, advertising and ratings, basic engineering, announcing and practice in news and informational radio.

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com1410

Fundamental visual art principles constitute the basis of effective visual communication. The course explores these fundamentals while applying the creative approaches unique to digital photography. Students will use the college’s digital darkroom (Adobe Photoshop) to refine and enhance the images they create for weekly assignments. In addition, students will develop a framework to analyze and evaluate photographs, whether created by themselves or others.

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com1281

Students will study theories of mass communication and the role that mass communicators play in modern society. The rise of print and electronic media will be discussed in detail. Special attention will be given to the rights, responsibilities and practices of mass media and merging trends.

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com1201

An introduction to the basics of print Journalism, including reporting, editing, newsroom management, news judgment, news writing and an overview of ethical and legal concerns. Students will analyze the way different local media cover breaking and feature news. The course provides the basic skills required for identifying, gathering, writing and editing news stories for newspapers. CO-REQUISITES: ENG1201 or ENG1601 or permission of intructor

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com1202

Building on the skills taught in COM1201, students will learn to develop news sources, cover beats, such as the courts and local politics, and write feature length news stories including breaking news, obituaries, and government. Students will learn the rights of reporters and use of the Freedom of Information Act to gain access to public records.

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chn1202

An introduction to Mandarin Chinese. This course emphasizes an integrated approach to basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Reading and writing skills are developed to a greater extent.

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chn1201

This course emphasizes an integrated approach to basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The Pinyin Romanization, basic grammar, and the development of reading skills of simple texts and character writing will be covered.

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che4899

Student internships provide professional learning experiences in positions relevant to the field of chemistry. Credit assignments will be determined on an individual basis.

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che4900

This course is designed for a student, working with a faculty member, to develop, plan, and execute an individualized laboratory research project in biochemistry or chemistry. The student and faculty member will hold, minimally, one meeting per week to discuss the student’s progress on the project. At the end of the semester, the student will submit a written research paper and give an oral presentation to the members of the department. The course may be taken a maximum of two times for a maximum of 6 total credits. Lab fee required.

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che4601

This laboratory course involves the experimental study of the structure and physical properties of biochemical systems through techniques such as absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, optical rotation, gel chromatography, electrophoresis, osmosis, and viscosity measurements. One three-hour laboratory session per week with laboratory fees. CO-REQUISITES: CHE4600

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che4698

The student will conduct individual laboratory or theoretical work under the supervision of a staff member. Laboratory hours and fees will be arranged on an individual basis.

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che4840

In this course, each student conceives and develops a laboratory project. The investigation will be an extension of techniques and skills acquired in previous chemistry courses, ending with a written research paper and oral presentation. This course serves as the culminating experience for the biochemistry and chemistry majors.

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che4301

A continuation of CHE4201 students gain a greater command of the laboratory techniques they have been studying by starting with a bacterial culture and isolating, purifying, and characterizing the kinetics and inhibition of the organism’s enzymes. Other experiments will cover methods for studying the metabolism of intact cells and cell organelles. Laboratory fee charged.

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che4600

The principles of physical chemistry will be applied to systems of biochemical interest, including a study of the solution properties, transport, and thermodynamic and optical properties of biochemical systems.

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che4300

A continuation of CHE4200, this course examines the control of enzymes, biochemical signaling processes, and energy metabolism. Other topics may be explored such as photosynthesis, the physiology of fuel metabolism, and others.

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che4200

This course examines the structure and function of the principal molecular components of living systems, including proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids. The study of enzyme function and catabolism is also included.

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che4201

This course is an introduction to methods of studying biomolecules. Techniques for the purification and analysis of DNA, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids are explored along with some chemical reactions commonly used to manipulate these molecules. One three-hour laboratory session per week with laboratory fees.

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che3650

This course is a study of the modern spectroscopic techniques used to characterize organic compounds, including ultraviolet, infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectroscopy.

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che3651

This laboratory course explores the synthesis, separation, purification, and characterization of organic compounds using advanced techniques. One three-hour laboratory session with a laboratory fee.

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che4050

This course examines the theory and instrumentation of optical electro-chemical and chromatographic methods of chemical analysis in current use in industry and research. One three-hour laboratory session per week with laboratory fees.

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che3601

This laboratory course is the study of the synthesis of inorganic compounds and characterization by chromatographic and spectrophotometric methods. One three-hour laboratory session with laboratory fees.

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che3501

This laboratory course is a continuation of CHE315L. One three-hour laboratory session per week with a laboratory fee.

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che3600

Studies of atomic and molecular structure are applied to representative non-metal compounds and coordination compounds and topics of current interest such as inorganic reaction mechanisms, catalysis, solid-state, and bioinorganic chemistry.

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che3401

The student will conduct experiments that illustrate the application of fundamental laws to actual systems. Formal reports are required. One three-hour laboratory session per week with a laboratory fee. CO-REQUISITES: CHE3400

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che3500

This course is a study of chemical kinetics and an introduction to quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics with applications to chemical systems.

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che3400

A mathematical approach to chemical laws and theories is presented, including a study of the properties of gases, chemical thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, phase equilibrium, and electrochemistry.

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che2600

This course presents a comprehensive examination of electrolytic solutions, including acid-base, oxidation-reduction, and solubility equilibria, and provides an introduction to modern analytical methods. The laboratory consists of analysis of representative inorganic unknowns by gravimetric, volumetric, and spectrometric methods. One three-hour laboratory session per week.

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che2401

This laboratory course discusses basic techniques for the preparation and identification of organic compounds, followed by experiments dealing with mechanistic aspects of organic reactions, and qualitative organic analysis. One three-hour laboratory session per week with a laboratory fee. CO-REQUISITES: CHE2400

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che2501

This laboratory course is a continuation of CHE2401, including qualitative organic analysis. One three-hour laboratory session per week with a laboratory fee. Breakage charges will be assessed on an individual basis. CO-REQUISITES: CHE2500

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che2400

This course is an integrated study of the bonding and structure of organic compounds, with emphasis on reactions, reaction mechanisms, and synthesis, with an introduction to organic spectroscopy.

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che2200

This course provides an introduction to the ways scientists communicate their theories and findings, including scientific journals, seminars, poster sessions, etc. Students will assess the quality of journal articles, write papers in the scientific idiom, and make oral presentations. The library and computer databases will be covered.

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che1700

A continuation of CHE1600, this course includes a study of chemical kinetics, acids and bases, equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and the chemistry of aqueous solutions. Co-enrollment in CHE212R (review) is required

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che1701

This laboratory course is a continuation of CHE1600. One three-hour laboratory session per week with a laboratory fee. CO-REQUISITES: CHE1700

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che1601

This course covers the basic laboratory techniques in chemistry and illustrates chemical principles through laboratory experiments. One three-hour laboratory session per week with a laboratory fee. CO-REQUISITES: CHE1600

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che1600

This course presents fundamental principles of chemistry, including a study of atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, and the states of matter. It is an introductory course for science majors, and is the course required for admission to medical school. It may also be used to satisfy the college’s general requirement in science. Co-enrollment in CHE211R (review) is required.

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che1200

This course surveys the fundamentals of chemical science, including the structures of elements and compounds, states of matter, properties of some important substances, and the chemistry of aqueous solutions. The laboratory introduces the use of basic chemical apparatus in observing chemical phenomena and making scientific measurements. One three-hour laboratory per week with laboratory fee. This course is not accepted toward a science major.

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che1210

This course provides the very basic principles of inorganic and organic chemistry and an in-depth understanding of the basic biological molecules that make up the cell and the biochemical reactions that allow it to function. General chemistry topics include ionic and molecular compounds, properties of liquids and solutions, and acids and bases. The organic chemistry material includes the basic principles of the major families of organic compounds, their properties, nomenclature and chemical reactions. The biological portion presents proteins and amino acids, enzyme and coenzyme chemistry, carbohydrates, and lipids. This is a one-semester course intended primarily for nursing majors. One three-hour laboratory per week with laboratory fee.

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che1110

This course is an introduction to some basic concepts in chemistry in the context of major issues of concern in today’s world. Topics related to the health and well being of humans will be covered and include plastics and polymers, nutrition, medicines and drugs, genetic engineering and DNA, forensic chemistry, and art and science. The laboratory presents experiments that support the topics discussed in class to illustrate how chemistry is practiced and to demonstrate how chemists solve problems. One two-hour laboratory session per week with laboratory fee. The course is intended for non-science majors and may be used to satisfy the general education requirement for scientific awareness.

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bus3000

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of law and the legal system as these apply to business transactions. Specific topics covered in the course are: contracts, agency, intellectual property rights, negotiable instruments, forms of business ownership, personal property, and real property.

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che1100

This course is an introduction to some basic concepts in chemistry in the context of major issues of concern in today’s world. Topics related to the environment will be covered and include: the chemistry of air pollution, ozone depletion, the greenhouse effect and climate change, energy, acid rain, and water pollution. The laboratory presents experiments that support the topics discussed in class to illustrate how chemistry is practiced and to demonstrate how chemists solve problems. One two-hour laboratory session per week with laboratory fee. The course is intended for non-science majors and may be used to satisfy the general education requirement for scientific awareness.

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bio4833

Biology majors will have the opportunity to conduct supervised research on individual research problems or to assist staff members in their research. Laboratory hours, credits, and fees will be determined on an individual basis. A research paper and presentation is required.

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bus1407

This course provides students with the tools and techniques to effectively communicate and present reports and ideas in the business environment. Included in the course is the proper construction of business reports, letters, memos and other communiques. Also included is the proper construction of a business presentation complete with visual aids (presentations tools such as PowerPoint). The course also provides the student with the use of information research techniques to find, analyze, and evaluate published business information and properly cite references. The student is given the opportunity to develop a recommendation to a business scenario and present it both in writing and orally.

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bio4803

The student will present seminars on current topics of biological research. Oral presentation techniques will be emphasized and a term paper is required.

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bio4804

The student will present seminars on current topics of biological research. Oral presentation techniques will be emphasized and a term paper is required.

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bio4350

Mechanisms of variation and adaptation in individuals and populations will be examined, with emphasis on historical and current concepts of speciation and systematics.

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bio4698

Students wishing to pursue directed study in advanced or specialized areas in any of the 300-level courses may do so with departmental permission. A thesis and final oral presentation is required. Laboratory work within the area of independent studies may be pursued under the provisions of BIO4833 or BIO4834 with laboratory fee.

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bio4210

An in-depth review of anatomical and physiological adaptations is comparatively applied to a study of the mammalian orders. The evolution, geographic distribution, and taxonomy of local mammals are emphasized, and topics of particular interest to students will be examined. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

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bio4220

This course involves the in-depth study of the classes of vertebrates, with emphasis placed on morphological and physiological grades of organization. The evolution, geographic distribution, and taxonomy of local vertebrates are also stressed. Independent student investigations will be designed, performed, and presented. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

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bio4200

This course will introduce the student to the biology of wildlife management, including a brief history of conservation management and current issues in wildlife management. The primary emphasis is on techniques used in the study of vertebrate populations and their interactions with humans. Principles of vertebrate population ecology/dynamics will be investigated.

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bio3800

This course would provide an opportunity for the Biology department to present varied topics of interest in modern biological science. It would also allow for an advanced treatment of topics introduced in foundation coursework. The course is listed for variable credit to allow for flexibility of topic selection, and the option to run the course with a laboratory component. It is likely to run most frequently as either a 3 credit lecture/discussion or a 4 credit lecture/discussion/lab course.

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bio4030

This course explores the foundations of molecular biology, and surveys many applications of molecular biology in academic, medical, industrial, and agricultural fields. Throughout the course, ethical and social concerns related to these applications are highlighted. The laboratory portion of the course emphasizes hands-on training in recombinant DNA techniques and computational analysis of data. Recent advances in large-scale genomic sequencing, whole-genome functional analysis, computational molecular biology, and bioinformatic topics are also covered. A laboratory fee is charged.

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bio3460

A study of the activities, interactions, and distribution of microorganisms in the environment, this course emphasizes the biogeochemical cycles, importance of microorganisms in ecosystems, and microbial biodegradation of pollutants and other substances. The laboratory will introduce students to the techniques of isolation, identification, and enumeration of microbes from nature. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

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bio3440

This course covers the fundamental concepts of how organisms interact with each other and with their environment. There is use of taxonomy and practice in finding key characteristics of organisms to focus on keying and identifying organisms in the lab and in the field. Also, quantitative analysis of data is performed regarding basic ecological concepts in the lab, in the field, and through the use of software. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee and three field trips per semester.

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bio3450

This course covers the principles of genetics from Mendel to modern genetic techniques used in biotechnology. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

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bio3430

Physiological control mechanisms are examined on cellular and organismal levels. The laboratory includes experiments and exercises illustrating principles of homeostasis, muscle action, nerve transmission, and sensory function. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

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bio3420

This course presents the general principles and concepts of comparative vertebrate embryology accompanied by an evaluation of pertinent advances in developmental biology. One 3 1/2-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

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bio3410

The principles of immunology are presented, including the general properties of the immune response, lymphocyte specificity and activation, immunogenetics, antigen-antibody interactions, congenital and acquired immunodeficiencies, the functions of cytokines and serology. The laboratory includes exercises and experiments illustrating the lecture topics. One 3-1/2 hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

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bio3150

This course is designed as a review of basic sciences topics for students who intend to apply to a health professional school, including medical school, dental school, veterinary school, physician’s assistance programs, and graduate programs focusing on a field with impacts on human health. The intent of the course is to provide a refresher course for advanced students who may require knowledge of basic science in order to advance to professional school. This course is recommended to juniors and seniors who have completed at least two years of introductory science courses and intend to enter the health professions.

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bio2430

The student will study the biology of representative microorganisms and viruses with emphasis on prokaryotic structure, metabolism, genetics, and diversity. Food microbiology is also covered. The laboratory focuses on the diversity and identification of bacteria. One 3-1/2 hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

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bio2420

This is an introductory course in botany and includes study of algal, fungal, and plant diversity, as well as plant physiology. Laboratory sessions investigate taxonomic diversity, anatomy and physiology, and experiments in plant growth and reproduction. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee, and one required field trip.

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bio2410

This course includes a comprehensive presentation of mammalian microscopic anatomy. The organization of tissues, organs, and organ systems will be examined. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

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bio2400

A comparative study of the classes of vertebrates, this course emphasizes the evolution of morphological characteristics. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

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bio1850

This course is designed to instruct students in how to write well on their application essays when they apply to a post-graduate school in the health professions and to learn the types of writing that are normally part of a career in that profession. This course is recommended to sophomores intending to enter the health professions.

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bio2200

A study of concepts and information about disease as it occurs in the individual, this course involves the study of pathologies pervading all systems, and those unique to specific organ systems.

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bio1400

This course is intended for students majoring in biology. It is an introduction to living organisms through the topics of molecular biology, biochemistry, cell biology, and genetics. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

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bio1500

This course is intended for students majoring in biology. It is an introduction to living organisms through the topics of taxonomy, evolution, the diversity of life, and physiology. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

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bio1300

This course introduces the student to the biology of microorganisms and viruses. The course is geared toward students in the health science fields and covers human pathogens and their control and the immune response. Laboratory exercises cover microbial diversity and techniques used to identify bacteria. One 3 1/2-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

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bio1210

This course continues the systematic exploration of the human body, including clinical considerations of the endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

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bio1200

This course presents the basic patterns and organizational theories of the human body, including topics of interest for students seeking careers in the health sciences, using a systems approach from cellular levels and support systems to control and regulation. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

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bio1130

This is an introductory course that emphasizes the biological aspects of environmental science. It is usually taken by non-science majors to meet the general education requirement for scientific awareness, or by students who would like to consider the biology major and are interested in an ecology/environmental science focus. The course examines how ecosystems function, and covers the issues of natural resource management, population dynamics, and pollution control throughout the world.

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bio1131

Students who need to fulfill their lab science requirement should take this lab in conjunction with BIO1130. Laboratory exercises will emphasize appreciation of the natural world, acquisition of basic biology lab skills, critical thinking, environmental problem solving, and use of experimental techniques in environmental biology. One two-hour laboratory period per week. Laboratory fee charged. CO-REQUISITES: BIO1130

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bio1150

This course is designed to instruct the student in the options available as the student considers postgraduate training for a career in the health professions, including medical school, veterinary school, dental school, physician’s assistant programs, optometry school, podiatry school, or even a graduate program with application to human health. Emphasis will be placed on maximizing the resources available at AIC to develop a resume and academic preparation. This course is recommended to freshmen intending to enter the health professions.

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bio1111

A continuation of BIO1101, this laboratory course emphasizes the microscopic and macroscopic examination of mammalian organ systems. One two-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

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bio1120

This course presents human biology and current biological concerns, including biological organization, investigation of selected organ systems, diseases, and current issues of human health and function. This course is intended for non-science majors and may be used to satisfy the general education requirement for scientific awareness. One two-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

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bio1121

Laboratory exercises will emphasize normal and abnormal anatomical and physiological complexes in man, including the heart and circulation systems, the digestive system, respiration and reproductive systems, and genetics. Topics on diseases, blood typing, DNA typing, forensics, and effects of drugs will be investigated. One two-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee. CO-REQUISITES: BIO1120

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bio1101

Basic laboratory techniques in biology will be stressed to illustrate chemical principles, cellular concepts, parasitism, modern genetics, and principles of plant biology and ecology. One two-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee. CO-REQUISITES: BIO1100

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bio1110

The basic concepts of BIO1100 are used as background to develop an understanding of the structure and function of mammalian organ systems and their evolutionary development. One two-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee. This course is intended for non-science majors and may be used to satisfy the general education requirement for scientific awareness.

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bio1040

This course continues an investigation into the principles of biological science. Topics covered include animal organization and diversity, microbial and plant biology, ecology, and the relationship of organisms to the environment. The relevance of biology to everyday life will be emphasized. This course is intended for non-science majors, and does not satisfy the general education laboratory science requirement for scientific awareness.

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bio1050

This couse investigates a variety of topics that are applicable to everday life. Environmental issues will be analyzed with a focus on how different fields of study play a role in determining outcomes. Scientific background presented includes: the scientific method, basic chemistry and physical science, basic ecology. Topics covered wil include: populations, communities, ecosystems, energy, water, soil and air as well as the legislation that exists pertaining to topic areas. This course is intended for non-science majors. This couse has no lab component and does not satisfy the general education requirement for scientific awareness.

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bio1100

This is a survey course of the basic physical and chemical principles essential to an understanding of molecular biology and its applications to the basic concepts of cellular morphology, physiology, cellular behavior, modern genetics, evolution, and ecology. One two-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee. This course is intended for non-science majors and may be used to satisfy the general education requirement for scientific awareness.

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bio1020

This course covers the animals of Massachusetts with a focus on the mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians, as well as some freshwater fishes. The species found in western Massachusetts are emphasized. Diversity, conservation, and human interactions with these animals are investigated. The laboratory will consist of viewing sample specimens of animals found in Massachusetts, learning about their characteristics and natural history, and may include outdoor field work to locate species or evidence of their existence. One two-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fees.

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bio1030

This course provides an introduction to the principles of biological science. Topics covered will include the process of scientific inquiry, cell chemistry, cell structure and function, genetics and inheritance. The relevance of biology to everyday life will be emphasized. This course is intended for non-science majors, and does not satisfy the general education laboratory science requirement for scientific awareness.

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asm4800

A weekly seminar for American Studies majors, with readings, discussion, and research/writings on topics that explore the interdisciplinary connections among the various courses taken for the program during individual semesters. Course is repeatable for additional credit when topics vary.

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bio1010

This course studies the life cycle of HIV Retrovirus, its transmission, immunological consequences, clinical effects, control, and epidemic potential. The biology of other sexually transmitted diseases such as Gonorrhea, Syphilis, Genital Herpes, Candidiasis, and their consequences will be explored. This course does not satisfy the general education requirement for scientific awareness.

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asl1201

An introduction to American Sign Language and deaf culture. The course will emphasize basic ASL communication skills, vocabulary, and grammatical structures, as well as applications in daily commerce.

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art1203

The course is designed to teach students different perspective techniques, 3-D illustration and photorealism using different media such as; black and white pencils, color pencils, pen and ink and paint. In addition, it provides an opportunity for students to learn scientific illustration ; specifically in the field of biology, botany and taxonomy wher such skill are often helpful. For all levels. Supply list provided.

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art1120

This is a course that develops an appreciation of the arts from the aesthetic and contextual appreciation of the utilitarian, practical, and sometimes not so practical, objects most frequently referred to as crafts. The course will examine the relationship of fine art to craft, the craft object as product of particular cultures, the utilitarian and ritual purposes to which these objects are put to use and how their creation corresponds to these purposes. The course will demonstrate how craft reflects the age in which it was created and craft as it relates to industry and contemporary society. There will be opportunities to learn how these crafts are made through hands on practice. Lab fee required.

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art1200

Train your eye to see and foster the ability to represent the 3-dimentional wourld on flat surface. Learn how to create the illusion of spatial depth and develop techniques for creating a protfolia of beautiful drawings. To the first class, bring charcoal pelcil,and pad of drawing papter, 12″x9″ or larger – Canson or Strathomer brands recomnended. Supply list provided at registration.

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art1030

This introductory course in art appreciation examines markmaking as the essential and primary means of expression. Lecture, visual aids, research writing and units of drawing explore the creative impulse of artists like Leonardo da Vinci, Paul Klee, Pablo Picasso and untrained outsider artists. The student will develop a primary vocabulary of form, materials, and methods for creative expression through studio work. Creativity and creative problem solving strategies are considered in the context of everyday life. Lab fee required.

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art1100

This course considers painting as it has developed from the early 19th century to the present through text, written assignments and studio exercises. Visual aids, slides and other resources familiarize the student with various Modernist artistic movements and individual artists. Studio work allows the student to better understand the formal principles of design, the nature of paint as a medium and the characteristics of creative endeavor. Field trip and Lab fee required.

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art1110

This is a studio arts course wherein the student will develop technical and expressive skills in the medium of acrylic paint. The student will explore realistic and conventionalized rendering in a pop idiom. They will gain understanding of the creative processing of an idea to result in a tangible product. Background information on pop art will be provided through slides, visual aids, and video from which the student will develop their own ideas. Students will learn about the relationship of pop art to commercial culture and the postmodern age in which we live. Lab fee required.

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art1000

This course traces world cultural development through the arts of architecture, sculpture and painting. The emphasis is on the social, economic, political, and geographic influences on the stylistic characteristics, subject matter and art forms of various world sites from the earliest prehistoric through the Modernist eras. The cultures of Africa, Australia, Oceania, the Near East, Greece, Rome, India, China, Japan, Europe (England, Ireland, Germany, Austria, Netherlands, France, Spain, Italy) and the Americas will be considered. Field Trip and fee required.

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art1010

The 1010 Aesthetic Experience of Contemporary Art Students will study the changing definitions of art and artists over time and the role of art as it relates to philosophical, ethical and societal issues. The course also examines the formal elements of art and the standards by which a work of art is examined and judged. Other unit topics include aesthetic philosophy or the changing philosophy of beauty, identity, ritual, racism, sex/gender, politics, commerce and societal responsibility as demonstrated by art historical examples concentrating on contemporary arts. Students will have written course work and studio work. Lab fees and Field trip required.

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aic1120

This course meets one hour per week for one semester and is intended for adult learners who are returning to college to complete their degrees and for certain non-traditional transfer students. The course is intended to help students readjust to academic pursuits. Skills to be reviewed include, but are not limited to: time management, note-taking, reading and study systems, test-taking, organization, and paper-writing. It will also familiarize new students with some of the academic resources and facilities available to them on campus. Open to Continuing Education and non-traditional transfer students upon recommendation of the appropriate dean.

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aic1130

This course will focus on career planning and decision making for students who are undecided as to a major. It is designed to engage students in goal setting and self-assessment of interests, values and skills. The course will introduce students to activities related to the exploration of career choices, the job outlook in specific career fields, and the professionalism required for the world of work.

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aic1140

The First Year Seminar is an academic course designed around the core goal of helping students successfully transition to college by meeting their educational, career, and personal goals. Students will be provided with information, skills and strategies necessary to fully engage and participate in their learning experiences both inside and outside the classroom. Focus is given to the areas that are critical for success in college: academic and career preparation; understanding the learning and development process; adjusting to the responsibilities of being an active member of the AIC community.

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acc6999

This course familiarizes the student with the resources available to the professional in the areas of financial reporting and taxation. The hierarchy of the sources of generally accepted accounting principles is discussed in the financial reporting area, while the Internal Revenue Code, regulations, rulings, and court cases are covered in the taxation area. The primary focus of the course is the completion of a major research project to serve as a capstone to the students study in the Master of Science in Accounting and Taxation program.

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aic1100

This course is designed to help facilitate your success in college by helping you master the skills necessary to reach your personal and educational goals. The opportunity is provided to enhance your ability to participate in and benefit from your total college experience. Learning Objectives: 1) Acquire effective learning and study skills such as time management, note taking, reading and study systems, test-taking skills, library research and writing skills, listening and communication skills. 2) Applying strategies that facilitate making a successful adjustment to college life such as understanding developmental tasks in college, understanding campus culture, policies and procedures, clarifying personal values and beliefs, understanding civility and civic responsibility, exploring educational and career interests, developing stress management skills and making healthy choices, understanding and appreciating individual and group differences, exploring other issues of importance to college students.

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acc6630

This course is a study of the function and approach to the problems of collecting, analyzing and presenting information to be used by corporate executives in making decisions governing company plans and policies. It shows how the controller can supply a reliable fact basis for the planning, direction, coordination, and control of the company organizations.

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acc6640

This course enables the student to understand current accounting and reporting systems of various countries. The international dimensions of accounting for multinational organizations and attempts to harmonize diverse accounting and reporting systems will be discussed.

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acc6650

This course will examine the various types of fraud that involve accounting information, financial fraud related to major business processes, as well as the common techniques used to assess the risk of financial statement fraud. Specific topics may include off balance sheet financing, fraudulent sales, asset valuations, conditional sales, understatement of liabilities, income-smoothing and expense capitalization.

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acc5610

Types of controls are identified and their effectiveness is evaluated. Emphasis is on the prevention and detection of both intentional and unintentional computer abuse. Existing and proposed legislation in this area will be discussed.

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acc6610

This course is designed to give the student a comprehensive understanding of business valuation processes through top to bottom analysis of firm characteristics using various valuation techniques. These include the income, asset, and market approach. The course will also cover capital budgeting techniques as they apply to the valuation process. These include weighted average cost of capital, the capital asset pricing model, and the build up method. The course will use case studies and current examples of valuations to illustrate current trends in this field.

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acc6620

Not-for-profit activities are a significant portion of the economy of the United States. This course discusses the accounting of the activities for federal, state and local government units, as well as colleges and universities, hospitals, and voluntary health and welfare organizations. The list of nonprofit organizations also includes social clubs, philanthropic foundations, civil and religious groups, and professional organizations.

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acc5520

This course is a study of the federal system of estate and gift taxation. Topics include calculation of the gross estate, utilization of the unified credit, wealth transfer planning, income taxation of estates and trusts, and the responsibilities of executors, administrators, and trustees.

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acc5605

This course will develop an understanding of the elements of fraud and financial crimes, including fraud prevention, detection and investigation. It will examine consumer fraud and fraud against organizations.

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acc5505

This course examines the various forms of business entity and the tax implications of each. Covered forms of business include C Corporations, S Corporations, Partnerships and Limited Liability Companies. The course also covers the formation, operation and liquidation of each, with particular emphasis on comparing and contrasting the strengths and weaknesses of each.

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acc5510

This course brings out the interrelationships between business operations and tax liability. Emphasis will be placed on an understanding and appreciation of tax factors in everyday decision making, tax planning, and possibilities of legitimate tax avoidance. Topics also include: definition of a corporation for tax purposes; tax problems incident to the formation of a corporation; survey of tax problems; and planning in the areas of nonliquidating distributions, redemptions, liquidations, accumulated earnings, compensation and fringe benefits, and gratuitous transfers of property.

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acc5515

This course is an introduction to the tax treatment of deferred compensation arrangements covering the formation and operating requirements of pension, profit sharing and stock option plans. Qualified plans, including Defined Benefit and Defined Contribution, are covered as well as 401(K), SIMPLE, and Simplified Employee Plans, as are non-qualified deferred compensation arrangements. Individual Retirement Accounts, both Roth and regular, are also discussed.

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acc5305

This course examines the Federal Income Tax Law and Regulations as they relate to individuals. Topics covered include calculation of gross income, business and personal deductions, tax computations and tax credits. Practical problems and preparation of returns are also discussed.

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acc5325

This course continues the study of the Federal Income Tax Law and Regulations. Topics covered include basis and determination of gain or loss, capital gains and losses, regular and S corporations, partnerships and research methods in taxation.

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acc5205

This course is a study of advanced accounting principles and practices. Topics include mergers and acquisitions, partnerships, international accounting and foreign currency transactions, and other topics of an advanced nature.

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acc5225

This course further studies advanced accounting principles and practices as they relate to nonprofit entities, including municipal governments, hospitals, universities, and voluntary health and welfare organizations. Current topics in accounting are also discussed.

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acc5300

This course studies accounting as it pertains to the needs of management; principally planning, controlling and decision making. Topics covered include: financial statement analysis; funds flow; cost terms, concepts, classifications, and behavior patterns; cost-volume-profit relationships; job order, process and standard costing; flexible budgets, profit planning, non-routine decision-making; pricing; and capital budgeting.

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acc5010

This course covers detailed accounting principles and practices in the areas of investments in stocks and bonds, plant assets, intangible assets, current and long-term liabilities, and stockholders equity. Other areas covered in detail include financial statement analysis and the statement of cash flows.

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acc5013

This course examines the fundamental theory, primary objectives, and working procedures of auditing. This course is designed to familiarize the student with the ethics and duties of the independent certified public accountant. The major course focus centers around the examination of financial statements, their supporting accounts and financial records, and the rendering of the audit report.

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acc5020

This course covers the study of accounting as it serves the needs of management, principally in planning, controlling, decision making, and determining product cost for pricing, inventory valuation and income determination. Course emphasis is on the use of this information by those seeking careers in management accounting. Topics covered include cost terms, concepts and classifications; job-order costing; process costing; cost behavior analysis and use; cost-volume-profit relationships; profit planning with the master budget; standard costs; flexible budgets and overhead analysis; measuring managerial performance; pricing and services; and relevant costs for decision making.

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acc5000

This course continues the study of basic concepts and principles, as well as accounting for the partnership and corporate forms of business organizations; coverage of plant assets, intangible assets, and current liabilities, long-term liabilities, and investments in stocks and bonds; a study of financial statement analysis, and the Statement of Cash Flows. Lecture classes and laboratory sessions meet at least four times per week. Laboratory fee.

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acc5001

This course includes a more comprehensive study of the principles and practices of accounting, a review of the accounting process, and a study of the design and content of financial statements. Detailed coverage is given to the areas of cash, receivables, and inventories.

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acc4403

This course is an advanced consideration of auditing procedures. Topics include: study of statistical sampling and electronic data processing and their impact on the audit; further coverage of audit reporting; practical use of audit programs and preparation of working papers; references to publications of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and to materials from the Uniform CPA examination. Offered periodically.

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acc4875

This course familiarizes the student with the resources available to professionals in the fields of financial reporting, auditing, and taxation. Topics discussed include Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, Generally Accepted Auditing Standards, the Internal Revenue Code, Internal Revenue Regulations, Revenue Rulings, and court cases. The primary focus of the course is the completion of a major research project to serve as a capstone to the student’s study in the accounting program.

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acc4899

This program will provide business majors with the opportunity to gain practical experience in the operations of accounting/business. The student will participate in managerial activities under the supervision of experienced executive and managerial personnel. Upon completion of the program, students must participate in a terminating seminar and submit a written report. An evaluation of the student’s effort will be obtained from the supervisor in the organization where he or she interned.

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acc3520

This type of white-collar crime is also known as “cooking the books” where various schemes are used to manipulate, misstate, or omit financial information to deceive financial statement users. This in depth study focuses on the detection and investigation of revenue-based, asset-based, liability-based, and other financial statement fraud, schemes, as well as the auditor’s liability in these criminal activities.

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acc3611

This course continues the study of the Federal Income Tax Law and Regulations. Topics covered include basis and determination of gain or loss, tax credits, capital gains and losses, regular and “S” corporations, partnerships, and research methods in taxation.

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acc4010

This course is an orientation to the Uniform Examination for Certified Public Accountants. Topics include: the structure and content of the examination; coverage of suggested examination approaches and techniques to maximize potential for successful results; review of multiple-choice questions, essay questions, and problems from past examinations, including the unofficial answers provided by the examining organization.

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acc3440

This course reviews the Federal Income Tax Law and Regulations as they relate to individuals. Topics covered include calculation of gross income, business and personal deductions, tax computations, and tax credits. Practical problems and preparation of returns are also discussed.

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acc3510

This interdisciplinary course begins with the exploration of te nature of fraud, its costs, and why it occurs. Emphasis then shifts to the analysis of the accounting and legal procedures used to fight or prevetnt the different types of fraud such as detection, investiation, and the dispositions or resolutions available.

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acc3422

This course focuses on advanced accounting principles and practices. Topics covered include mergers and acquisitions, partnerships, international accounting and foreign currency transactions, and other topics of an advanced nature.

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acc3431

This course continues the study of advanced accounting principles and practices as they relate to nonprofit entities, including municipal governments, hospitals, universities, and voluntary health and welfare organizations. Current topics in accounting are also discussed.

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acc3350

Types of controls are identified and their effectiveness is evaluated. Emphasis is on the prevention and detection of both intentional and unintentional computer abuse. Existing and proposed legislation in this area will be discussed.

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acc3402

This course examines the fundamental theory, primary objectives, and working procedures of auditing. The course is designed to familiarize the student with the ethics and duties of the independent certified public accountant. The major focus of the course centers around the examination, review, and compilation of financial statements and their supporting accounts and financial records, and the rendering of an accountant’s report.

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acc3411

This course is a study of accounting as it serves the needs of management, principally in planning, controlling, decision making, and determining product cost for pricing, inventory valuation, and income determination. Course emphasis is on the use of this information by those seeking careers in management accounting. Topics covered include cost terms, concepts, and classifications; job-order costing; process costing; cost behavior analysis and use; cost-volume-profit relationships; profit planning with the master budget; standard costs; flexible budgets and overhead analysis; measuring managerial performance; pricing and services; and relevant costs for decision making.

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acc2401

This course expands on the topics of elementary accounting with a more comprehensive study of the principles and practices of accounting. It includes a review of the accounting process and a study of the design and content of financial statements. Detailed coverage is given to the areas of cash, receivables, and inventories.

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acc2601

This course provides further detailed coverage of accounting principles and practices in the areas of investments in stocks and bonds, plant assets, intangible assets, current and long-term liabilities, and stockholders’ equity. Other areas covered in detail include financial statement analysis and the Statement of Cash Flows.

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acc1201

Topics include: the basic structure, principles, and practices of accounting; the nature and classification of accounts; the accounting cycle and the preparation of financial statements for both service and merchandising enterprises; design of accounting systems, including special journals and subsidiary ledgers; and coverage of cash, receivables, inventories, deferrals, accruals, plant assets, intangible assets, and current liabilities. Lecture classes and laboratory sessions meet at least four times per week. Laboratory fee.

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acc1601

This course continues the study of basic concepts and principles, as well as accounting for the partnership and corporate forms of business organizations; coverage of plant assets, intangible assets, and current liabilities, long-term liabilities, investments financial statement analysis, and the Statement of Cash Flows. Lecture classes and laboratory sessions meet at least four times per week. Laboratory fee.

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acc2016

This course is designed to provide the student with a working knowledge of the use of microcomputers in accounting. Topics covered include an introduction to operating systems, bookkeeping, and computerized tax preparation. Computer accounting systems and the audit of such systems are discussed. Offered periodically.

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acc2210

This course is a study of accounting as it serves the needs of management, principally in planning operations, controlling activities, and making decisions. Course emphasis is on the use of accounting by those seeking careers in other areas of business. Topics covered include cost terms, concepts, and classifications; job-order costing; process costing; cost behavior analysis and use; cost-volume-profit relationships; profit planning; standard costs; flexible budgets and overhead analysis; and relevant costs for decision making.

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acc1012

The primary focus of this course is the preparation of federal and state income tax returns for the individual. Topics covered include calculation of gross income, deductions, tax computations, and tax credits. Practical problems and preparation of returns are emphasized so as to give the student a working knowledge of the field. Offered periodically. For non-accounting majors.

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acc1100

Topics in this course include: basic structure and principles of accounting; the nature and classification of accounts; the accounting cycle and the preparation of financial statements for both service and merchandising enterprises; and coverage of accounting systems and practices. Offered periodically.

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NUR4999 – Capstone Seminar (3)

This course provides the student the opportunity to synthesize previous knowledge and skills in a supervised practicum experience with the guidance and approval of the faculty. The clinical project provides students with the opportunity to explore a problem or issue of particular personal or professional interest that is related to one of the following nursing competencies: patient-centered care, teamwork/collaboration, evidence based practice, quality improvement, safety or informatics (QSEN: http://www. qsen. org). PRE-REQUISITE(S): RN to BSN Students Only and 4600

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NUR4941 – Nursing Leadership (6)

Focus on the leadership process and development of the leadership role of the professional nurse. Students apply the nursing process in primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention. Students analyze leadership and management functions, characteristics, styles, and roles. Interpersonal communication, staff development, change theory, and assertiveness skills are applied. PRE-REQUISITE(S): NUR4940

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NUR4600 – Leadership and Management in Nursing (3)

Synthesis of theories and concepts related to leadership and management such as, critical thinking, clinical judgment or reasoning, change theory, conflict resolution, delegation, and changes that impact the health care delivery system is discussed. The aspects of the role of the nurse as leader and manager are explored in depth, with a special emphasis on the role of the nurse as change agent. The course will provide practical information for the practicing nurse to strengthen problem solving, decision- making, and critical thinking abilities, which are all vital in today’s rapidly changing health care delivery systems. PRE-REQUISITE(S): RN to BSN Students Only and NUR4400 and NUR4200

 

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NUR4540 – Trends and Issues in Nursing (3)

Increases the student’s ability to synthesize the knowledge, skills, concepts, and theories essential for effective professional nursing practice. Students examine issues that affect clients and healthcare systems. Consideration is given to the impact of cultural, economic, ethical, legal, political, professional, and social issues upon nursing practice.

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NUR4532 – Senior Seminar I (1)

This course will assist the student in preparing for the Nurses (NCLEX-RN) Examination. The student will be required to complete content modules and attend computerized practice sessions in prepartion for a culminating computerized exit examination and success on the NCLEX-RN examination.

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NUR4400 – Evidence-based Practice (3)

This course focuses on the development of nursing knowledge and the improvement of nursing practice through current relevant evidence. Research methods are examined and current issues are analyzed in relation to the implementation of evidence-based practice in selected settings. Content includes identification of clinical questions, analysis of evidence for potential solutions/innovations, planning and implementing practice changes, evaluating outcomes and identifying gaps in nursing knowledge.  Process for leading and managing practice changes through the use of evidence based research to promote effective or positive patient outcomes are explored.

  1. Summarize the history of nursing and evidence based practice
  2. Identify the basic elements of the research process and levels of research evidence
  3. Differentiate between qualitative, quantitative and outcomes research (1, 2, 3)
  4. Identify data collection methods and procedures for qualitative, quantitative and evidence based practice
  5. Analyze evidence for validity and reliability in application to practice
  6. Describe the nurse’s role in implementing and disseminating research and EBP
  7. Demonstrate quality improvement skills as they relate to patient centered outcomes in practice
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NUR4351 – Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing (6)

Develops knowledge and skills in applying the nursing process with individuals and families experiencing stressors affecting psychosocial needs. Students expand previous knowledge of human behavior and interpersonal relationships. Behavior is viewed on a continuum from healthy, adaptive responses to unhealthy, maladaptive responses. Therapeutic use of self as a nursing approach is emphasized in providing care in day treatment and inpatient settings. Students investigate selected mental health issues and analyze professional roles within the context of primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention. PRE-REQUISITE(S): NUR3940, NUR3941, NUR3942

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NUR4340 – Community Focused Nursing (6)

Synthesizes nursing and public health principles as applied to assessing, promoting and preserving the health of populations. Assists students to conceptualize the complexities of community dynamics (cultural, economic, political, and social) as they impact on the health of the community. Students apply the nursing process in primary, secondary and tertiary levels of prevention. PRE-REQUISITE(S): NUR3940, NUR3941, NUR3942

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NUR4250 – Global Issues in Nursing Practice (3)

This course introduces global health care systems and models and their influence on health disparities in the delivery of healthcare. Content provides a foundation to examine factors influencing the health of communities and populations locally, nationally and globally. Basic public health principles and sciences are used to identify factors that influence promote and maintain health of populations. The use of epidemiological data and knowledge of environmental health, social determinants of health, genetics/genomics, and the influence of culture on health behaviors will be discussed. PRE-REQUISITE(S): RN to BSN Students Only and NUR4200

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NUR4200 – Health Promotion and Care of Vulnerable Populations (3)

This course will examine the role of nursing in providing care to vulnerable populations within the community. Theories of community health and nursing practice will be discussed as well as concepts of health promotion and preventative care for vulnerable individuals, families, groups and communities. Content focuses on risk reduction, health maintenance, and promotion of high level wellness to individuals, families, and groups of all ages throughout the health continuum. PRE-REQUISITE(S): RN to BSN Students Only and NUR3650

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NUR3942 – Family Centered Nursing Process (2)

Analyzes the family system as it responds to stressors throughout the life cycle. A variety of approaches to family analysis are considered throughout the course. Students apply the nursing process in studying the roles, functions, values, and communication patterns within family. Teaching-learning principles are implemented in completing a health teaching project in the community. Students apply the nursing process in primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention. PRE-REQUISITE(S): NUR3740, NUR3540 CO-REQUISITES: NUR3940, NUR3941

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NUR3940 – Family Centered Nursing (10)

Focuses on the role of the professional nurse in assisting the family and its individual members to adapt to stressors of the childbearing and childrearing phases of the life cycle. Students learn to apply the nursing process to meet the needs of families along the health-illness continuum. Clinical experiences include nursing care of the antepartal, intrapartal, and postpartal woman and her newborn, well and hospitalized children, and their families. Health teaching activities occur in various healthcare settings. PRE-REQUISITE(S): NUR3740, NUR3540 CO-REQUISITES: NUR3941, NUR3942

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NUR3740 – Adult Medical Surgical Nursing (9)

Provides students with the opportunity to continue application of the nursing process. Emphasis is placed on assessment and diagnosis, expansion of planning and implementation, and beginning use of evaluation. In acute care settings, students provide health care to adults experiencing stressors affecting biophysical needs. Students apply the nursing process in primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention. PRE-REQUISITE(S): NUR2740, NUR2840, NUR2302

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NUR3680 – Applications of Statistics for Health Professionals (3)

This course is designed to assist the students to acquire an understanding of the applications of statistical methods as a basis for identifying research problems, planning and implementing a research plan. The focus of the content is on the knowledge and skills to use, and interpret output from, statistical analysis techniques that are frequently encountered in the clinical literature of nursing, medicine, psychology and epidemiology, and other health related disciplines. Emphasis is placed on application and solid conceptual understanding of statistical inference with different study designs. PRE-REQUISITE(S): RN to BSN Students Only

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NUR3650 – Advanced Concepts in Nursing Practice (3)

Building on previous knowledge and skills applicable to the practice of professional nursing, this course enhances the transition of registered nurses to the baccalaureate prepared professional nurse role. Emphasis is on the challenging role of the nurse in today’s global healthcare system. Content focuses on the interrelated concepts of nursing theory, models of health and illness, evidence-based practice, critical thinking, and clinical judgment. Changes in the health care environment and the impact on the professional nurse’s role as part of the interprofessional healthcare team are discussed. PRE-REQUISITE(S): RN to BSN Students Only

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NUR3600 – Ethics and Law of Health Care for Nursing (3)

The legal and ethical aspects of the nurse’s role in leading and managing safe and effective patient-centered care are examined in this course The ethical responsibilities of the nurse as well as decision-making models related to health care situations will be discussed. The content focuses on the identification and analysis of legal and ethical concepts and principles underlying nursing practice and health care. Topics include an exploration of current ethical and legal issues that impact professional nursing and health care practice. PRE-REQUISITE(S): RN to BSN Students Only

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NUR3540 – Nursing Research (3)

Includes discussion of nursing theories and research methods. Emphasis is placed on critical analysis of published nursing research. Attention is paid to ethical issues and the contribution of research in developing nursing theory and improving nursing practice. PRE-REQUISITE(S): All prerequisites for NUR206; CO-REQUISITES: NUR206. RN Students: NUR2740, NUR2840, PSY2302

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NUR2840 – Fundamentals of Professional Nursing Practice (6)

Introductory concepts of the art and science of professional nursing practice are presented and integrated into clinical practice. Gordon’s Functional Health Pattern is introduced as the fundamental assessment tool. Selected nursing skills and physical assessment are presented in lecture, practiced in the Nursing Learning Laboratory, and applied in providing care to adults in the clinical setting nursing practice focuses on all aspects of the nursing process, and utilizes the three levels of prevention (primary, secondary, and tertiary) to facilitate adaptive responses to stressors affecting physiological and safety needs. PRE-REQUISITE(S): NUR2540, BIO2200, PSY2450, CHE1210

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NUR2740 – Pharmacology (3)

This course provides the student with a foundation for application of concepts of pharmacology in nursing practice. Drugs will be presented by classification, groups and prototypes. Principles of drug action, including pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, nursing considerations and client teaching for each prototype will be emphasized. PRE-REQUISITE(S): NUR2540, BIO2200 PSY2450

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NUR2731 – Pathophysiological Foundations for Nursing Practice (3)

This course will examine the concept of human disease states and their clinical management from a nursing perspective. This course will help the pre-clinical nursing student apply knowledge of anatomy and physiology to the study of adaptive and maladaptive processes that lead to illness. Specific physiologic concepts will be discussed, including cellular adaption, inflammation, tissue oxygenation and perfusion, fluid and electrolyte balance and the body’s defense system. Alterations of the major body systems will be emphasized, including cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurologic, renal, hematological and endocrine systems.

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NUR2540 – Introduction to Professional Nursing (3)

Introduces the components of the organizing framework of the nursing major. Various theories, e. g., health-illness continuum, Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, developmental, communication, and crisis, are presented and discussed as they relate to individual systems (client, family, community). Explores the history, definition, philosophy, and role of professional nursing. The role of the professional nurse is identified as keeping the client system stable by intervening at primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention levels. Environmental forces, e. g., socioeconomic and cultural, that impact on nursing practice are presented. Selected ethical and legal aspects of nursing practice are identified. The laboratory experience introduces computational concepts required for professional nursing practice. Concepts include (but are not limited to) systems conversion, ratio and proportion, dosage calculations, and intravenous calculations supported with a computerized assisted learning program. PRE-REQUISITE(S): BIO1200, BIO1210, BIO1300; PSY1401; SOC1100; ENG1100; ENG1202 and CHE1210 may be taken concurrently.

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