Occupational Therapy

Bachelor of Science/Master of Science (MSOT)

Whether it’s redesigning a play area for a child in a wheelchair, planning holiday shopping strategies for an adult with heart and breathing problems, or modifying job tasks so a returning veteran with a traumatic brain injury can return to work…OT’s make a difference in people’s lives.

Guided by a belief in the power of being physically, mentally, spiritually and socially active, OT’s assist people who are at risk for medical/psychological problems to prevent injury or health conditions by leading healthy and productive lives. From providing you with the foundations of professional occupational therapy to helping you with HIPAA training and examination, AIC’s MSOT program provides a comprehensive educational approach. For current undergraduates looking for more information, visit the OT page on myAIC. (Login may be required.)

If you can see yourself being a health professional who makes a difference, then the Master of Science in Occupational Therapy Program at AIC can help you get there.

Expand the link below to learn more about our program’s accreditation and licensure exam pass rates.

Accreditation and Pass Rates

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

Occupational therapy has been consistently rated as one of the top, recession-proof jobs. Learn more

What You'll Learn

What You'll Learn

You will gain the knowledge and skills to help individuals of all ages to participate in the activities that they want and need to do in their daily life.

Future Studies

Future Studies

The MSOT prepares you for practice in a wide variety of settings and provides you with the foundation to continue your studies at the doctoral level.

Please select either Track One or Track Two below.

Track One (BSOS/MSOT) - Year One

Track One (BSOS/MSOT) - Year Two

Track One (BSOS/MSOT) - Year Three

Track One (BSOS/MSOT) - Year Four

Track One (BSOS/MSOT) - Year Five

Track Two (MSOT) - Year One

Track Two (MSOT) - Year Two

Track Two (MSOT) - Year Three

Pre-Professional Foundation Phase

The First Year Seminar is an academic course designed around the core goal of helping students successfully transition to college by meeting their educational, career, and personal goals. Students will be provided with information, skills and strategies necessary to fully engage and participate in their learning experiences both inside and outside the classroom. Focus is given to the areas that are critical for success in college: academic and career preparation; understanding the learning and development process; adjusting to the responsibilities of being an active member of the AIC community.

English Composition 1201 is a writing-intensive course that prepares students for all levels of academic discourse. Emphasis is placed on the art of persuasion, on the development of students’ critical thinking skills, and on key rhetorical concepts such as audience, purpose, and voice. Students learn the various steps to the writing process, from brainstorming to final revision, and learn the importance of writing coherent, unified, and organized essays that are fundamentally and mechanically sound. Though primarily a writing course, English Composition 101 also helps students see the connection between reading and writing. In addition, students learn the art of academic research and documentation. ENG1201 is determined by performance on a placement test or by satisfactory completion of ENG1100.

ENG1202 is an advanced writing course and is designed to extend reading and writing skills developed in English 1201. Emphasis is placed on critical and analytical writing and the analysis and interpretation of texts. Students are exposed to a variety of texts from fields across the curriculum. They write essays in response to what they read by formulating and defending a thesis, by synthesizing sources, and by evaluating information and ideas from multiple perspectives. In addition, students demonstrate an ability to do research and to document their work in the major academic styles.

This course will provide students with the foundational knowledge and skills in the use of library resources and common computer tools. It will be broad enough in scope to enable students to continue learning independently as well as to build discipline-related knowledge and skills both within and beyond the college curriculum. Legal and ethical considerations will be addressed.

This course covers the basic principles of behavior, that make up the foundation of psychology. Emphasis is placed on the biological basis of behavior, sensation, perception, learning, language, memory, thinking, infancy, and childhood. The methods of inquiry used in psychology are also emphasized.

continuation of PSY1401, with an emphasis on the application of psychology to contemporary life. Topics include: motivation and emotion; social behavior; adolescence and adulthood; personality; abnormal behavior and psychotherapy; stress, health, and psychology of the workplace.

The purpose of this course is to examine the concepts of human development, from conception to old age. Specifically, the course looks at how physical, cognitive, and socioemotional factors interact to influence learning, intelligence, language development, and the growth of personality. Major theories and the research that supports or refutes them are examined.

This course examines the historical perspectives of abnormal behavior, and the nature, classification, etiology, and treatment of a variety of psychopathologies. Intended for majors in psychology, nursing, criminal justice, occupational therapy, physical therapy, special education, and human services.

This course is designed to acquaint the student with working knowledge of the concepts used by sociologists and with the well-established generalizations in the field. Topics include socialization, primary groups, stratification, population, and bureaucracy. This course is a prerequisite for all other sociology courses.

This course presents the basic patterns and organizational theories of the human body, including topics of interest for students seeking careers in the health sciences, using a systems approach from cellular levels and support systems to control and regulation. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

A conceptual approach is used to understand the human body as a living system governed by the basic laws of physics. Topics include forces exerted by muscles, circulation of blood, nerve conduction, vision, perception of sound, and effects of radiation. Lectures are augmented with demonstrations requiring student participation.

Students perform a series of experiments on force, torque, energy, heat, electricity, sound, and optics to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of the physical principle on which the human body functions. These experiments also include making EKGs, studying galvanic skin response, respiration, and pulse rates. One two-hour laboratory session per week with laboratory and breakage fees.

This course presents the principles of statistics as applied to the analysis of biological and health data. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, non-parametric statistics, and regression analysis. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of computer software.

This course presents the principles of statistics that are applied to the analysis of data pertinent to the field of occupational therapy. Topics include descriptive and inferential statistics, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, estimation, analysis of variance, non-parametric statistics, and linear regression analysis. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of computer software.

Professional Foundation Phase

This course introduces students to the foundational principles of occupational therapy practice including historical perspectives, the philosophical base and current research of the profession. The course will utilize the guiding documents of the American Occupational Therapy Association the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process, 2nd edition to promote students’ understanding of the meaning and dynamics of occupation and activity as a foundation of OT evaluation, intervention and outcomes. Roles and responsibilities of the occupational therapy practitioner will be explored utilizing the AOTA Standards of Practice and Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics and Ethics Standards. The course will promote development of values related to being an occupational therapist including cultural competency, client-centered, occupation-based and evidenced-based practice.

This on-line course utilizes an E-Textbook that is available at www. aicmedterm. com. This course is an on-line, computer-based course that is designed for occupational therapy students. The tutorial format has an 800 page online printable textbook. The E-Textbook includes 3000 color medical pictures that will visually assist students to understand why specific word parts were selected to form the thousands of specialized compound Medical & Scientific terms discussed in this course. In addition, the E-Textbook contains interactive audio-visual lecture pages that prepare each student for the 1000 self-testing flashcards and the 800 multiple choice self-test questions. Students are provided with an opportunity to study and replay the audio-visual online lectures and complete the self-testing activities at a convenient time and place.

This course is a specialized writing course that is focused on the writing skills necessary for clinical practice. This includes understanding the requirements of clinical documentation, and the mechanics of research writing. Students will learn how to research, outline concepts, document information, and cite sources using the American and Psychological Association (APA) format. Students will enhance their skills in observation and documenting observations, critically reading and interpreting information, comparing and contrasting written material, and comprehending quantitative vs. qualitative data. Students will experience multiple opportunities to practice and refine writing skills by using the language and terminology that is appropriate for screenings, evaluation, problem and goal statements, intervention plans, and progress notes.

This course provides students with an opportunity to survey and apply basic concepts, theories, and values that are the foundation of occupations in people’s lives from a global perspective and including concepts from sociology, psychology, and anthropology. Consideration of the occupational needs, history, and patterns of engagement of individuals across the life span will be studied in order to develop occupational profiles that include the influences of family, society, culture, and spirituality.

This course presents the neurological foundations of human performance, behavior, and emotion through a variety of formats. Students will gain an understanding of the structure, function, and development of the nervous system and its influence on human behavior throughout the lifespan. This course explores how the nervous system functions, how it develops, and how it controls thoughts, emotions, and actions. Content will include anatomy, physiology, and functioning of the central and peripheral nervous systems, including clinical examples illustrating the impact of disease, trauma, learning, and developmental change on the everyday activities of people of all ages.

Through active participation in activities, this course will develop skills in analyzing activities of daily living, work and productive activities, play or leisure activities, and social participation. The analysis will include the physical and environmental requirements to perform activities. It will identify facilitators and barriers to performance including performance skills, client factors, activity demands, and contexts. The coursework will explore the relationship of activities to broader areas of occupation. The course will offer the students an opportunity to begin to develop skills in teaching, collaborative planning, and goal writing.

This course will utilize the guiding documents of the American Occupational Therapy Association the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process, 2nd edition to promote students’ ability to apply their understanding of the meaning and dynamics of occupation and activity as a foundation of OT evaluation, intervention and outcomes. Students will learn how to explain and justify the importance of supervisory roles, responsibilities, and collaborative professional relationships between the occupational therapist and the occupational therapy assistant utilizing AOTA’s official documents, including AOTA’s Standards of Practice. The course will promote the development of values and professional responsibilities related to being an occupational therapist including cultural competency, client-centered, occupation-based and evidenced-based practice.

The course will explore the themes of building scientific knowledge as the basis for disciplinary development, using research evidence to answer clinical questions, and transforming clinical problems into researchable questions. The process of becoming a scholarly practitioner that utilizes research-based data to select assessment tools, develop goals, decide on intervention strategies, and measure outcomes will be discussed. The steps in the research process that includes generating a question, reviewing the existing literature, and designing a study that produces evidence to help answer the question, will be described and applied to learning activities. Course activities will include searching the literature using books, journals, and electronic databases; and analyzing peer-reviewed articles from occupational therapy and related journals to assess the validity and reliability of assessment instruments, the effectiveness of treatment interventions, and the use of statistics in testing and outcomes measurement.

Human gross anatomy is an examination of the structures of the human body. The course includes an in-depth presentation of the musculoskeletal system, with limited consideration of other body systems. The course material will be conveyed through lectures, laboratory experiences with human cadaver pro-sections, ADAM computerized dissections of the human body, audiovisual tapes, and anatomical models.

This course provides information regarding the theory of group dynamics that includes communication, group process, group development, leadership styles, and group roles and norms. Human occupation, cognitive, and developmental models are introduced. Students will be required to apply activity analysis and observation skills as both group leaders and members. Students will participate in a community group during the semester.

This course is an introduction to the study of the movements of the human body. Students examine the major joint complexes of the body, including the skeletal, muscular and neurological contributions to movement at each joint, and consider the physical forces that influence human movement. Students also observe, analyze, and document using SOAP format the skilled movement patterns needed for occupational performance in daily life. The course material is presented in lecture and laboratory format and is supplemented with hands-on sessions for practicing range of motion and manual muscle testing skills on peers. Skeletal and anatomical models and audiovisual materials will complement the instructional process.

CO-REQUISITES: OTR5150

This is the first course in the comprehensive exam series that addresses domain areas related to the foundations of occupational therapy. The course stresses developing critical reasoning skills within the context of the exam. Active learning is emphasized, with practice in reading, interpreting, and answering multiple choice and clinical simulation questions to help assess strengths and weaknesses.

Graduate Professional Phase

This course in the physical performance series addresses psychosocial development from birth to adolescence. Developmental theories and models of psychodynamics, cognition, behavior, and occupations are examined. The DSM-IV diagnostic categories for disorders of children and adolescents are included such as learning disabilities, pervasive developmental disorders, and anxiety disorders. Specific emphasis is on the emotional development, social interactions, and physical play environments of young children and adolescents. The effects of dysfunction on the occupations of the child/adolescent are studied including contextual effects on the family, and societal systems. Therapeutic assessment and intervention for occupational dysfunction in this age range will be explored. Level I Fieldwork is integrated within the course work affording the opportunity to apply classroom experiences to real life clinical experiences.

This course in the physical performance series addresses gross and fine motor development from birth to adolescence. Developmental theories and models of motor learning, sensory integration, acquisitioned, and perceptual motor are examined. Performance skills addressed include typical and atypical feeding patterns, postural development, mobility, and eye-hand coordination relative to development of self-care, educational, play, social, and pre-vocational occupations. Sensory motor dysfunction is addressed including but not limited to cerebral palsy, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, and congenital anomalies. The effects of dysfunction on the occupations of the child or adolescent are studied including contextual effects on the family, and societal systems. Therapeutic assessment and intervention for occupational dysfunction in this age range will be explored. Level I Fieldwork is integrated within the course work affording the opportunity to apply classroom experiences to real life clinical experiences.

This is the first of two courses examining the role of assistive technology in promoting optimal occupational functioning across the lifespan. This course will provide an introduction to the theories and principles of assistive technology intervention for occupational performance disruption during childhood and adolescence. Performance contexts and their impact on occupational performance and use of assistive technology will be examined. Various types of assistive technology used at home, in school, and in the community will be explored. Students will be required to apply activity analysis skills in problem solving and developing assistive technology interventions. Students will be introduced to the utilization of assessment data and assistive technology in the therapeutic process. Legal, ethical and funding issues will also be introduced. Student will participate in classroom activities and hands-on labs to construct simple assistive devices. Field trips and Level I Fieldwork observations and assignments will be used to apply classroom learning.

This course examines the continuum of care and methods of service delivery for pediatric populations in a variety of medical, educational, and social settings. Current issues affecting service delivery including access, quality, and cost will be identified and discussed. Students are challenged to recognize the influence of federal legislation and health care policy on current practice and to identify and analyze the social, economic, political, and demographic factors and trends that influence the delivery of pediatric practice in the United States. The occupational therapists emerging role within the context of health promotion, community, and public health will be discussed. Students participate in Level I Fieldwork experiences in pediatric/adolescent settings as part of this course.

As the second course in the research series, this course provides an opportunity for in-depth examination of the concepts, problems, needs, and issues involved in evaluating and conducting research in occupational therapy. The nature, relevance, and application of qualitative and quantitative research methods are examined as they relate to the development of an attitude of scholarly inquiry in this practice profession. The themes of evidence-based assessment and intervention, and outcomes measurement based in occupational performance resurface in the context of defining scholarship in occupational therapy. Students will develop beginning level research skills by initiating the development of a proposal for a scholarly project. Student outcomes will include the identification of a researchable problem/question and a review of the literature on a topical area.

This course explores psychosocial aspects of occupational performance among adult and older adult populations. Using the DSM-IV-R criterion, occupation and function are explored in varied contexts and phases of wellness, illness, and disability. With this fundamental knowledge, students will engage in clinical reasoning in the areas of evaluation, goal setting and treatment planning using a collaborative model and an emphasis on meaning and purposeful activity. The inter-relationship and inter-dependence of person, physical environment, and the larger social context will be reinforced through the application of theoretical principles. Assessment tools, theoretical approaches, intervention planning, and techniques appropriate to this age range will be explored. Level I Fieldwork is integrated within the course work affording the opportunity to apply classroom experiences to real life clinical experiences.

This course explores physical development and functioning as it relates to occupational performance from early to late adulthood. Changes in the human body affecting skeletal, muscular, neurological, cardiopulmonary, and sensory systems will be examined. Functional implications on development and maintenance of occupational roles will be analyzed, and the importance of purposeful activity to maintain wellness will be highlighted. The integration of person, environment, and occupation will be stressed when applying theoretical principles to pathologic conditions, and in developing support systems to enable optimal occupational performance throughout adult life. Therapeutic assessment and intervention for occupational dysfunction in this age range will be introduced. Level I Fieldwork is integrated within the course work, affording the opportunity to apply classroom experiences to real life clinical experiences.

This is the second of two courses examining the role of assistive technology in promoting optimal occupational functioning across the lifespan. Performance contexts and their impact on occupational performance and use of assistive technology with a focus on the occupations of adulthood will be examined. Assistive technology in the areas of ergonomics, environmental evaluation/adaptation and control, and community mobility will be addressed. Assistive technology interventions focused on increasing function and participation in home, work, school, and community contexts will be explored. Students will be required to apply activity analysis skills in problem solving and developing assistive technology interventions. Demonstration of competency in environmental evaluation, basic computer adaptations, and teaching compensatory strategies is expected by the end of the semester. Students will analyze the effects of technology on the lives of people with disabilities through readings, assignments, and Level I Fieldwork experiences.

This course examines the continuum of care for adult populations while exploring issues of service delivery within the medical and social systems. The class will focus on issues related to access, quality, and cost of health care. Students are challenged to recognize the influence of federal legislation and health care policy on current practice and to identify and analyze the social, economic, political, and demographic factors and trends that influence the delivery of health care in the United States. Students participate in Level I Fieldwork experiences in adult settings as part of this course.

This is the first course in the comprehensive exam series that addresses domain areas related to the foundations of occupational therapy. The course stresses developing critical reasoning skills within the context of the exam. Active learning is emphasized, with practice in reading, interpreting, and answering multiple choice and clinical simulation questions to help assess strengths and weaknesses.

This course is designed to prepare the student for supervision and management issues related to future clinical practice. The management portion of this course will present management theory pertinent to the occupational therapy/health care industry. Organizational behavior and structure will be discussed in relation to professional organizations that influence the delivery of occupational therapy services. Management principles and strategies involved in the managerial functions of planning, organizing, staffing, budgeting, directing, evaluating and marketing will be examined and applied during class and individual assignments. Classroom discussion topics will emphasize communication skills, supervision and professionalism.

This is the second course in the comprehensive exam series that addresses practice areas related to management and psychosocial occupations. The course stresses developing critical reasoning skills within the context of the exam. Active learning is emphasized, with practice in reading, interpreting, and answering multiple choice and clinical simulation questions to help assess strengths and weaknesses.

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