Chemistry

Bachelor of Science

AIC’s Chemistry program provides a rigorous examination of the nature and significance of the chemical world.

In your studies, you’ll both explore the fundamental principles of chemistry and learn how to apply this knowledge safely and ethically through your work in a number of laboratory settings.

Chemistry is a broad science, one that supports and links to a number of other disciplines, including engineering, biology, manufacturing, and geology.

As a graduate of the program, you’ll have the skills and knowledge needed for a variety of advanced degree programs and careers, including:

  • Industrial laboratories
  • Clinical laboratories
  • Chemical, materials, and pharmaceutical manufacturers
  • Food and drug industries
  • Educational institutions
  • Medicine
  • Environmental science
  • Metallurgy
  • Pharmacology

Learning Outcomes for Chemistry

I appreciate the Chemistry program’s small class sizes at AIC. You really have a chance to get to know your professors, and they will go out of their way to help and support you in any way they can.

—Karlbuto Alexandre ’14 Chemistry Minor

In the classroom. In the workforce.

What you’ll learn

What you’ll learn

You’ll explore both the fundamental principles of chemistry 
and learn how to apply this knowledge safely and ethically through your work 
in a number of laboratory settings.

Future Studies

Future Studies

The program helps prepare you for a variety of graduate degree programs, including political science, sociology, or law.

Career opportunities

Career opportunities

As a graduate, you’ll be prepared to work in a variety of settings, including industrial laboratories
, clinical laboratories, chemical, and pharmaceutical manufacturers, food and drug industries, and educational institutions.

Major:

  • CHE1600: General Chemistry I, with review and laboratory
  • CHE1700: General Chemistry II, with review and laboratory
  • CHE2200: Introduction to the Scientific Literature
  • CHE2400: Organic Chemistry I, with laboratory
  • CHE2500: Organic Chemistry II, with laboratory
  • CHE2600: Analytical Chemistry, with laboratory
  • CHE3400: Physical Chemistry I, with laboratory
  • CHE3500: Physical Chemistry II, with laboratory
  • CHE4050: Instrumental Analysis, with laboratory
  • CHE4840: Senior Seminar
  • MAT2400: Calculus I
  • MAT2500: Calculus II
  • MAT2600: Calculus III
  • MAT2004: Biostatistics
  • PHY1600: General Physics I, with review and laboratory
  • PHY1800: General Physics II, with review and laboratory

Plus eight (8) credit hours from the following, including two (2) credits of laboratory:

  • CHE3600: Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
  • CHE3601: Advanced Inorganic Laboratory
  • CHE3650: Spectroscopy of Organic Compounds
  • CHE3651: Advanced Organic Laboratory Techniques
  • CHE4200: Biochemistry I, with laboratory
  • CHE4300: Biochemistry II, with laboratory
  • CHE4600: Physical Biochemistry, with laboratory

Minor:

  • CHE1600: General Chemistry I, with laboratory and review
  • CHE1700: General Chemistry II, with laboratory and review

Plus 12 credits from 2000-level chemistry courses that satisfy the chemistry major and include at least two credits of laboratory.

Course Descriptions

This course presents fundamental principles of chemistry, including a study of atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, and the states of matter. It is an introductory course for science majors, and is the course required for admission to medical school. It may also be used to satisfy the college’s general requirement in science. Co-enrollment in CHE211R (review) is required.

A continuation of CHE1600, this course includes a study of chemical kinetics, acids and bases, equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and the chemistry of aqueous solutions. Co-enrollment in CHE212R (review) is required

This course provides an introduction to the ways scientists communicate their theories and findings, including scientific journals, seminars, poster sessions, etc. Students will assess the quality of journal articles, write papers in the scientific idiom, and make oral presentations. The library and computer databases will be covered.

This course is an integrated study of the bonding and structure of organic compounds, with emphasis on reactions, reaction mechanisms, and synthesis, with an introduction to organic spectroscopy.

This course is a continuation of CHE2400.

This course presents a comprehensive examination of electrolytic solutions, including acid-base, oxidation-reduction, and solubility equilibria, and provides an introduction to modern analytical methods. The laboratory consists of analysis of representative inorganic unknowns by gravimetric, volumetric, and spectrometric methods. One three-hour laboratory session per week.

A mathematical approach to chemical laws and theories is presented, including a study of the properties of gases, chemical thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, phase equilibrium, and electrochemistry.

This course is a study of chemical kinetics and an introduction to quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics with applications to chemical systems.

Studies of atomic and molecular structure are applied to representative non-metal compounds and coordination compounds and topics of current interest such as inorganic reaction mechanisms, catalysis, solid-state, and bioinorganic chemistry.

This laboratory course is the study of the synthesis of inorganic compounds and characterization by chromatographic and spectrophotometric methods. One three-hour laboratory session with laboratory fees.

This course is a study of the modern spectroscopic techniques used to characterize organic compounds, including ultraviolet, infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectroscopy.

This laboratory course explores the synthesis, separation, purification, and characterization of organic compounds using advanced techniques. One three-hour laboratory session with a laboratory fee.

This course examines the theory and instrumentation of optical electro-chemical and chromatographic methods of chemical analysis in current use in industry and research. One three-hour laboratory session per week with laboratory fees.

This course examines the structure and function of the principal molecular components of living systems, including proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids. The study of enzyme function and catabolism is also included.

A continuation of CHE4200, this course examines the control of enzymes, biochemical signaling processes, and energy metabolism. Other topics may be explored such as photosynthesis, the physiology of fuel metabolism, and others.

The principles of physical chemistry will be applied to systems of biochemical interest, including a study of the solution properties, transport, and thermodynamic and optical properties of biochemical systems.

This course discusses limits, continuity, derivatives, maximum and minimum problems, related rates, and Mean Value Theorem. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of a graphing calculator and computer software.

This course includes the study of integration, applications of the definite integral, transcendental functions, and methods of integration. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of a graphing calculator.

This course includes the study of hyperbolic functions, polar coordinates, vectors and parametric equations, l’Hopital’s Rule, sequences, infinite series, limits, continuity, partial differentiation, optimization, and multiple integration for functions of several variables. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of a graphing calculator.

This course presents the principles of statistics as applied to the analysis of biological and health data. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, non-parametric statistics, and regression analysis. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of computer software.

This is a basic course that covers the fundamental principles of mechanics, vibration, and thermodynamics. Newton’s laws of motion will be applied to a broad range of practical problems involving real phenomena. The laws of thermodynamics will be utilized to study thermal processes and properties. Students will learn to develop working equations from basic concepts in order to solve problems. The course is taught without calculus.

This is a continuation of PHY1600 covering the fundamental principles of electricity, magnetism, light, and modern physics. The course is taught without calculus.

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