Interdisciplinary Science

Bachelor of Science

The bachelor’s degree in interdisciplinary science offers a student the opportunity to design an individualized, multidisciplinary degree program with a solid foundation in the natural sciences. A distribution of upper-division electives may include courses in biochemistry, biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will demonstrate familiarity with the knowledge base comprising their chosen field of science
  • Students will be able to effectively communicate scientific findings
  • Students will demonstrate familiarity with research skills used in scientific investigation

Major Requirements

  • BIO1400: Biology I, with laboratory
  • BIO1500: Biology II, with laboratory
  • CHE1600: General Chemistry I, with review and laboratory
  • CHE1700: General Chemistry II, with review and laboratory
  • CHE2400: Organic Chemistry I, with laboratory
  • CHE2500: Organic Chemistry II, with laboratory
  • PHY1600: General Physics I, with review and laboratory
  • PHY1800: General Physics II, with review and laboratory
  • MAT2004: Biostatistics

Choose one from the following courses:

  • BIO1300: Principles of Microbiology, with laboratory
  • BIO2430: Microbiology, with laboratory

And one from the following courses:

  • BIO2400: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy, with laboratory
  • BIO2410: Animal Histology, with laboratory
  • BIO3440: Ecology, with laboratory

Plus one from the following courses:

  • BIO4803: Senior Seminar in Biology
  • CHE4840: Senior Seminar in Chemistry

Additionally, all interdisciplinary science majors must complete two of the following:

  • MAT1840: College Algebra and Trigonometry
  • MAT2400: Calculus I
  • MAT2500: Calculus II, with laboratory

Plus a minimum of 15 credit hours in courses from the following:  BIO1200, BIO1210,  any 2000 or higher level in biology, chemistry, or mathematics, with the exception of
courses specified by each department.

Course Descriptions

This course is intended for students majoring in biology. It is an introduction to living organisms through the topics of molecular biology, biochemistry, cell biology, and genetics. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

This course is intended for students majoring in biology. It is an introduction to living organisms through the topics of taxonomy, evolution, the diversity of life, and physiology. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

This course presents fundamental principles of chemistry, including a study of atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, and the states of matter. It is an introductory course for science majors, and is the course required for admission to medical school. It may also be used to satisfy the college’s general requirement in science. Co-enrollment in CHE211R (review) is required.

A continuation of CHE1600, this course includes a study of chemical kinetics, acids and bases, equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and the chemistry of aqueous solutions. Co-enrollment in CHE212R (review) is required

This course is an integrated study of the bonding and structure of organic compounds, with emphasis on reactions, reaction mechanisms, and synthesis, with an introduction to organic spectroscopy.

This course is a continuation of CHE2400.

This is a basic course that covers the fundamental principles of mechanics, vibration, and thermodynamics. Newton’s laws of motion will be applied to a broad range of practical problems involving real phenomena. The laws of thermodynamics will be utilized to study thermal processes and properties. Students will learn to develop working equations from basic concepts in order to solve problems. The course is taught without calculus.

This is a continuation of PHY1600 covering the fundamental principles of electricity, magnetism, light, and modern physics. The course is taught without calculus.

This course presents the principles of statistics as applied to the analysis of biological and health data. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, non-parametric statistics, and regression analysis. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of computer software.

This course introduces the student to the biology of microorganisms and viruses. The course is geared toward students in the health science fields and covers human pathogens and their control and the immune response. Laboratory exercises cover microbial diversity and techniques used to identify bacteria. One 3 1/2-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

The student will study the biology of representative microorganisms and viruses with emphasis on prokaryotic structure, metabolism, genetics, and diversity. Food microbiology is also covered. The laboratory focuses on the diversity and identification of bacteria. One 3-1/2 hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

A comparative study of the classes of vertebrates, this course emphasizes the evolution of morphological characteristics. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

This course includes a comprehensive presentation of mammalian microscopic anatomy. The organization of tissues, organs, and organ systems will be examined. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee.

This course covers the fundamental concepts of how organisms interact with each other and with their environment. There is use of taxonomy and practice in finding key characteristics of organisms to focus on keying and identifying organisms in the lab and in the field. Also, quantitative analysis of data is performed regarding basic ecological concepts in the lab, in the field, and through the use of software. One three-hour laboratory period per week with laboratory fee and three field trips per semester.

The student will present seminars on current topics of biological research. Oral presentation techniques will be emphasized and a term paper is required.

In this course, each student conceives and develops a laboratory project. The investigation will be an extension of techniques and skills acquired in previous chemistry courses, ending with a written research paper and oral presentation. This course serves as the culminating experience for the biochemistry and chemistry majors.

This course is an in-depth survey of algebraic and geometric problem solving techniques, including solutions of polynomial equations and inequalities, curve sketching techniques, and trigonometry from the triangular and functional standpoint. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of both a graphing calculator and computer software.

This course discusses limits, continuity, derivatives, maximum and minimum problems, related rates, and Mean Value Theorem. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of a graphing calculator and computer software.

This course includes the study of integration, applications of the definite integral, transcendental functions, and methods of integration. The course will make active use of technology by requiring the use of a graphing calculator.

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