Social Science

Bachelor of Arts

The Bachelor of Arts in Social Science is conferred upon students who have satisfactorily completed a minimum of 120 semester hours of academic work. This program is designed to meet two major objectives: to provide students with a solid introduction to the social sciences and to allow students (through judicious use of their electives) the flexibility to combine those studies with their vocational or avocational interests. This joining of diverse fields of study is at the heart of the traditional liberal arts curriculum, a curriculum which seeks to lead the student to develop a broad information background, an ability to make sense out of a complex world, and to articulate clearly and succinctly one’s thoughts to others, both orally and in written form.

Learning Outcomes
  • Articulate concepts from a broad background of information in liberal arts
  • Identify, describe, and analyze key concepts of behavior, social influences, and societal issues in the study of human sciences
  • Compare and contrast key concepts in a complex world and identify interdependencies
  • Articulate clearly and succinctly one’s thoughts to others, both orally and in written form

Major Requirements

Students select three areas of concentration from the following areas:
Economics, history, political science, psychology, sociology

  • Concentration I: Twelve (12) credits in selected social science
  • Concentration II: Twelve (12) credits in selected social science
  • Concentration III: Six (6) credits in selected social science

Course Descriptions

This is a survey course developed for the non-economic and non-business school major, designed to explore in a non-technical manner economic issues of importance to both the macro and micro economy. Potential topics to be covered include: an examination of the workings of a market system, inflation, economic growth, unemployment, fiscal and monetary policy, international trade, consumer demand, market structure and firm theory, income distribution and poverty, and antitrust, agricultural, and environmental policies.

The course provides a systematic framework for understanding the contemporary world that we now live in. It is a world of interconnecting countries possessing special combinations of natural, cultural, social, political, and economic environments. The course will help the student to develop an appreciation of these countries and their individual impact on the rest of the world. This will lead to a better understanding of not only the old world order but, more importantly, the new world now evolving. The course breaks the world down into 12 geographical realms, each of which will be reviewed in detail.

This course is devoted to the study of the fundamental principles and processes of an economic system, with special emphasis on the coordination and control of the United States economy. Emphasis is on the macroeconomic approach.

This course examines individual decision making in various applied economic environments. Areas of application include international trade, market structures, labor markets, and various U. S. institutional environments, both public and private. Basic emphasis is on the microeconomic approach.

This course studies the economic principles of labor markets, and human resource economics. Issues concerning labor supply and demand, wage differentials, the role of education, investment in human capital, unemployment, discrimination, income inequality, and labor unions are discussed, with emphasis on application to the U. S. institutional framework.

This course provides an analysis of economic relationships among countries, including studies of the balance of payments, the international currency system, government adjustment policies, the pure theory of international trade, and international financial markets, as well as an examination of recent issues of national industrial trends towards protectionism.

This course is a survey of U. S. economic history from its colonial beginnings to the present, with emphasis on the interaction of economic forces and historical development. Basic economic innovations, ranging from the utilization of unique forms of U. S. transportation to the innovative American system of manufacturing, will be analyzed. The importance of immigration policy and the status of minorities in the development of the American economy will also be examined.

This course examines the existence and impact of concentration of economic power in the U. S. business community, and the role of the public sector in the control of influence of concentration. Special emphasis will be placed on legislative enactments, judicial enforcement of antitrust law, and the impact of government regulation on the dispersion and decentralization of economic power and influence.

This course allows students to apply economic knowledge and reasoning to a wide variety of important issues. Both domestic and international topics of major importance can be considered; for example, urban decay, pollution, the re-industrialization of American industry, women in the workforce, international conflict resolution through trade, and the history of minorities in U. S. economic development.

This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of general theory and practice, with emphasis upon those principles common to all special fields: property, life, disability, liability, workers’ compensation, fidelity, and automobile insurance. Accounting majors may take this course for economics credit.

This course provides the student with an opportunity to develop a thorough analysis of demand, supply, production and cost relationships, monopoly, competition, oligopoly, labor markets, and the operation of industry in the modern American economy. Individual decisions of consumption, production, and labor supply are emphasized.

The course presents the essentials of money and banking with special reference to developments of recent years. Balanced emphasis upon both theoretical and practical aspects of the subject is the basis for interpretation of problems such as inflation, recession, the interest rate structure, and national debt.

This course allows the student an opportunity to develop a thorough understanding of the macroeconomy through an analysis of the effects of fiscal and monetary policy on aggregate output, interest rates, the price level, and inflation in the domestic economy and abroad. Special emphasis is placed on recent U. S. experience with inflation and unemployment, and several new proposals designed to counter cyclical behavior and stagnant growth in the mature U. S. economy.

This course is designed to develop comprehensive understanding of the economics of such political environments as communism, Marxism, modern socialism, fascism, and market-directed socialism. The economic systems of selected emerging countries are discussed, including the modern Russian and Eastern European economy, China, and Cuba. Comparisons are drawn with modern mixed-capitalist economic systems in the U. S., Japan, and Hong Kong and selected countries in Western Europe.

This course covers the theory and applications of the economics of urban areas and regional forces. The importance of economic factors working to shape the physical environment is emphasized, using modern tools of economic analysis in an applied setting, with special emphasis on the Springfield area and New England in historical and modern contexts. Case studies of urban economic growth, urban planning, urban renewal, and financing of urban services are discussed.

This course presents a study of the most important individuals in the development of modern economic thought. Both early and contemporary economists will be discussed, and their specific contributions will be related to current economic theory and practice.

This course conducts a thorough study of the effects of monetary management upon economic activity in theory and practice. Recent developments in central banking policy are examined. In addition, the interdependence of financial markets, the implications of U. S. Federal Reserve policy for domestic and foreign economic activity, and the effect of government debt policy are discussed.

The purpose of this course is to analyze a set of challenges that developing countries experience today, and the successes and failures of programs designed to address these challenges. Topics include health, nutrition, education, inequality, land reform, gender, corruption and infrastructure development.

This course covers a study of the forces causing fluctuations in business activity. Possible devices to stabilize the economy will be explored. Also, the course will explore ways used by economists to attempt to predict the level of economic activity.

This course presents an introduction to the economic analysis of the revenue and expenditure activities of governments. Emphasis is placed on the effects of government policies of expenditure, budget, and debt on the performance of the economy.

The course introduces the student to the practice of economic reasoning in the solution of real world managerial decision problems. In addition to developing the theoretical and analytical tools of economic decision making, this course enables students to develop judgment skills required in the application of managerial economics. Emphasis is placed on the use and application of economic analysis in clarifying problems, in organizing and evaluating information, and in comparing alternative courses of action.

The purpose of this course is to introduce the theory and practice of econometric analysis to undergraduate students. Topics include basic probability theory and statistics, distribution theory, estimation and inference, bivariate regression, introduction to multivariate regression, introduction to statistical computing (using Excel).

Selected readings chosen in accordance with the student’s interests.

An introductory survey of the historical evolution of Western civilization from its ancient origins to AD 1500. This course introduces students to methods of and issues in historical investigation. Its comprehensive approach includes the study of social and economic elements, religion, philosophy, literature, art, politics, and institutional developments.

An introductory survey of the historical evolution of Western civilization from AD 1500 to the present. This course introduces students to methods of and issues in historical investigation. Its comprehensive approach includes the study of social and economic elements, religion, philosophy, literature, art, politics, and institutional developments.

This course will provide a survey of World History from the origins of humanity to the Fifteenth Century, just before the European “voyages of discovery” that brought the Americas and Pacific into contact with the rest of the world. It will focus on the development of major civilizations around the globe with a special interest in the political, economic, cultural and other ties between these civilizations.

This course will provide a survey of World History from the Fifteenth Century to the present. It will focus on the global contacts and connections created since Columbus’s voyage in 1492 as well as on important political, economic, social and cultural trends that have contributed to the creation of the modern world.

A one-semester, sophomore-level survey of world history, comprehensive in both chronology and geography. Principal concepts in geography, political science, economics, and the history of science will be featured. Designed specifically for Massachusetts state teacher certification needs, this course will emphasize Western civilization, including United States history and Massachusetts state history.

A survey of the evolution of the United States from its colonial origins to the end of Reconstruction, this course explores the significant social, economic, intellectual, and political developments, including state history of Massachusetts.

A survey of the evolution of the United States from the late 19th century to the early 21st, this course explores the significant social, economic, intellectual, and political developments during “the American Age” of global history, including state history of Massachusetts.

The powers, function, and inherent conflicts of the Congress and the presidency are examined with emphasis placed on the historical development of institutions.

A survey of major themes in the cultural history of the Ancient Mediterranean world, beginning with the near east and continuing through Greek and Roman civilization. These cultures were remarkable for the scope of their intellectual achievements, ambition and power. As a result, the study of classical civilization is the traditional basis of a liberal education, providing a vital understanding of the moral and intellectual roots of current ideas on morality, politics, language and literature. This course explores the history of the Mediterranean world from the time of Homer to the fall of the Roman Empire. Topics include: Greek and Roman mythology, the philosophy of Plato and Aristotle, Greek and Roman theater, Latin classics (Seneca, Cato, Caesar, Tacitus, Livy) and major styles of art and architecture.

This course examines the structure of both presidential and congressional elections and the resultant consequences of those structures. The historical development of elections is emphasized. A case study of either the presidential or congressional midterm election will be analyzed with special attention given to campaign strategies.

A study of medieval Europe. This course will focus on the institutional, intellectual, and cultural aspects of the period, especially as they became the foundation for the Western heritage of today’s world. Covering from late antiquity to the Italian Renaissance, the topics will include social and economic study as well.

This course will explore the topic of European integration from a variety of perspectives, including those of history, political science and sociology. The first half of the course will concentrate on the pre-history and history of the European communities leading to the creation of the European Union in November 1993. Then, it will look at the European Union’s institutions and how they function, the relationship between the member states and the EU, and special issues that face the EU today.

This seminar will introduce students to the basic issues and methods involved in the academic discipline of history. It will require them to write a paper based on independent research on a topic related to the theme chosen by the instructor for the seminar.

A systematic examination of world history from the international rivalries leading to World War I through the early twenty-first century. Emphasis will be on the political, economic, and cultural evolution of global society and the forces that unify as well as fragment that society.

This course will examine immigration and ethnicity in American history and life. In order to do so we will examine successive waves of free and forced immigration from Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas, from the 1600s to the 2000s. Particular attention will be paid to the nature of the immigrant experience and the regulation of immigration.

The First World War was arguably the most important event of the twentieth century. It had a profound impact on international relations, political ideas, the conduct of war, the global economy, Western society, and culture and the arts. It altered the map of both Europe and the Middle East and set the stage for another world war as well as for decolonization. We are still living with many of its legacies today. This discussion-based course will begin by reviewing the nineteenth century international system and discuss the reasons why the war broke out in August 1914. It will then examine the course of the war on all its fronts as well as its effects on the home fronts of the belligerent countries, including on the arts and literature. Finally, it will consider the Paris Peace Settlement of 1919 and war’s long term consequences, including its place in historical memory around the world.

The Second World War was the bloodiest conflict in recent history. It had a profound impact on our world. This discussion-based course will explore the international system in the 1920s and 1930s and the various factors that led to the outbreak of the conflict in Europe and Asia. It will then examine the course of the global war itself, including its impact on civilians. Finally, it will consider the consequences of the war and how it is remembered in various countries today.

This course will examine the international history of the Cold War. Special emphasis will be placed not only on the rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union, but also on how the entire world between 1945 and 1991 was influenced by the competition between the different ideologies and socio-economic systems that those countries represented. It also will suggest how the Cold War has continued to influence our present era.

This course will focus on German history from the late nineteenth century to the present. Topics covered include the creation of a German nation state in the form of the Second Empire in 1870-71; politics and society in imperial Germany; the origins of the first world war and the collapse of the empire in 1918; Germany’s first experiment with democracy between 1918 and 1933; the rise of national socialism with its devastating consequences; the era of two German states after 1945, one on each side of the Cold War; and the unexpected peaceful reunification of 1989-90.

A study of the cultural movement known as the Renaissance. Focus is on the Italian version of this movement; specific features to be examined include humanism, “new” scholarship, literature, and art. Though medieval in its origins, the Italian Renaissance marks the beginning of modernity; emphasis will be on its heritage today.

A general survey of the practices and purposes of war through the ages. Special attention will be given to theories of aggression and to reasons for war. Tactics, strategy, and major battles of great military commanders will be covered.

This course will examine the nature and significance of the American radical tradition from the American Revolution to the present-day. Among the radical philosophies and movements to be covered will be the American Revolution; abolitism; utopian experiments; womens rights; the labor movement; populism; socialism and communism; civil rights; Black power; feminism; the New Left; environmentalism; the gay and lesbian movement; and the global justice movement. Examination of the American radical tradition suggests that radicalism has been a persistent and significant feature of American history.

An offering of topics that vary. Examples of past or anticipated future subjects include: Classical Mythology; Augustine to Chaucer; Medieval Literary Culture; Three Crowns: Dante, Bocaccio, and Petrarch; Women in Medieval and Renaissance Italy; The Scientific Revolution; The History of Italy.

This course will introduce students to the theory, methodology and practice of oral history research. As the primary requirement for the course students will record an interview with a family or community member using a standard oral history questionnaire and then transcribe and analyze their interview. With the permission of the interviewee the recording and transcribed interview will be donated to an oral history archive to be housed in the college library.

Topics to be examined will include slavery and racism, abolitionist and antislavery movements, Civil War and Reconstruction, Jim Crow, the Great Migration, the Depression and New Deal, World War Two and Cold War, Civil Rights and Black Power, and the impact of de-industrialization, unemployment and incarceration. Emphasis will be placed on the experience of African-Americans and their contributions to the development of a democratic society. Course readings will consist of relevant primary sources and recent secondary scholarship.

The course will examine the African American experience from 1400 to 1877. Topics will include African Slavery, the rise of the Transatlantic Slave Trade, Slavery and racism in Colonial America, the American Revolution and Slavery, Antebellum Slavery in the South, Abolitionist and Antislavery movements in the North, the Civil War & Emancipation, and Reconstruction. Emphasis will be placed on the African and African-American experience and the contributions of African-Americans to the growth of democracy. Readings will consist of the recent secondary scholarship and primary sources.

Topics to be examined will include the origins of the Cold War, the post-World War Two economic boom, the liberal and radical movements of the Sixties, the Conservative revival of the Seventies and Eighties, the end of the Cold War, and the impact of globalization and terrorism. Emphasis will be placed on the experience of ordinary men and women and their contributions to the development of a democratic society. Course readings will consist of relevant primary sources and recent secondary scholarship.

A study of the historical role of the U. S. Supreme Court and its impact on American society, including an examination of issues of political theory and major court cases.

Topics to be examined will include Progressivism, World War One, the Twenties, the Crash and Great Depression, New Deal and World War Two. Emphasis will be placed on the experience of ordinary men and women and their contributions to the development of a democratic society. Course readings will consist of relevant primary sources and recent secondary scholarship.

An analysis of the Holocaust, including examination of its causes and the conduct of it. Emphasis will be on the political, social, and moral issues involved in war and on the impact of the Holocaust on today’s Jewish experience worldwide.

An examination of the evolution of the United States from the late 19th century through the early 21st, this course explores significant social, economic, intellectual, and political developments during “the American Century” of global history.

This course surveys the ideas of leading political thinkers from ancient times to the Renaissance. Figures such as Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, St. Thomas, Ibu Khalduhn, and Machiavelli will be discussed.

This course is a study of the evolution of American political thought from 1776 to the present day, with special reference to the liberal tradition. Among the figures surveyed are Hamilton, Madison, Calhoun, Sumner, Dewey, Santayana, Skinner, Marcuse, and others. This course is not open to freshmen.

Designed as a reading seminar, participants will read some material in common at the beginning of the semester in order to provide a basic body of knowledge. The emphasis of the course will be independent readings on chosen topics within twentieth-century world history, to be reported on in open discussion with other participants throughout the semester. This course is repeatable for credit with an appropriate change of individual topics.

This course is the capstone experience for all history majors. They will select a topic in conjunction with the instructor and write a substantial paper on it based on independent research. It is offered every semester and may be taken either in the fall or spring of the senior year.

Students may pursue supervised reading and/or research in topics they find especially interesting, for one, two, or three credit hours. Advance arrangement and permission of the department chair required.

This course allows history majors to enhance their knowledge of historical research or of public history by designing their own internship at a local museum, archive, or similar institution. They will be required to work a regular number of hours (usually ten) each week during the semester. Besides fulfilling the expectations of their on-site supervisors, they must also write regular reports for their faculty supervisor. This course is offered every semester. It also may be taken over the summer if the internship opportunity is located outside of the greater Springfield area. In this case, it is expected that the participant will work a full-time schedule covering at least several weeks for their sponsoring institution. Students may take it only once for academic credit.

This course provides an overview of the discipline of political science, including its division into the four fields of political theory, American Politics, comparative politics and international relations. Students will learn basic concepts in politics and analyze governmental types, forms of political participation, and political socialization.

This course provides an overview of American politics and government, focusing on Constitutional principles, national institutions of governance, and politics actors, such as political parties and the media.

This course provides acomparative examination of governmental and political systems, with the American system considered as point of comparison in some cases. The corse will focus on one or two areas of the world, such as the Middle East or Europe.

This course focuses on the politics, institutions, and policy processes of state and local governments. State and local governments provide essential services, suchas education and policing, and are considered the building blocks of democracy. In this course, comparisons will be made among states but much attention will be paid to the state of Massachusetts and city of Springfield.

This course is a study of the international community and of the forces that determine political relations among the nation states it comprises. Consideration is given to the character of the nation state, the nature and determinants of political power in a multistate system, and the conduct of diplomacy.

The powers, function, and inherent conflicts of the Congress and the presidency are examined with emphasis placed on the historical development of institutions.

This course is a study of the organizations, characters, bases, and operations of party systems with emphasis on the United States. The historical development of the parties is investigated.

This course examines the structure of both presidential and congressional elections and the resultant consequences of those structures. The historical development of elections is emphasized. A case study of either the presidential or congressional midterm election will be analyzed with special attention given to campaign strategies.

The student will study political concepts, institutions, and processes in the Middle Eastern political systems.

This course examines the role of the media in political life, considering its roles in polling, setting the agenda, and providing political information. The structure of the media, including its ownership, will be studied as will its influence as an interest group.

This course will explore the topic of European integration from a variety of perspectives, including those of history, political science and sociology. The first half of the course will concentrate on the pre-history of the European communities leading to the creation of the European Union in November 1993. Then it will look at the European Union’s institutions and how they function, the relationship between the member states and the EU, and special issues that face the EU today.

This course is the study of nature, function, and power of the Supreme Court in the American political system via study of its decisions. Emphasis is placed on cases about separation of powers, federalism, and economic liberties.

effectiveness of the legal system in protecting and promoting individual rights are examined and discussed via a reading of constitutional case law. Special attention is given to rights of the accused, freedom of speech and religion.

The First World War was arguably the most important event of the twentieth century. It had a profound impact on international relations, political ideas, the conduct of war, the global economy, Western society, and culture and the arts. It altered the map of both Europe and the Middle East and set the stage for another world war as well as for decolonization. We are still living with many of its legacies today. This discussion-based course will begin by reviewing the nineteenth century international system and discuss the reasons why the war broke out in August 1914. It will then examine the course of the war on all its fronts as well as its effects on the home fronts of the belligerent countries, including on the arts and literature. Finally, it will consider the Paris Peace Settlement of 1919 and war’s long term consequences, including its place in historical memory around the world.

The Second World War was the bloodiest conflict in recent history. It had a profound impact on our world. This discussion-based course will explore the international system in the 1920s and 1930s and the various factors that led to the outbreak of the conflict in Europe and Asia. It will then examine the course of the global war itself, including its impact on civilians. Finally, it will consider the consequences of the war and how it is remembered in various countries today.

A study is made of the politics and problems of implementing governmental policies with particular emphasis on organization, management, personnel, finances, responsibility, and bureaucracy.

This course will examine the international history of the Cold War. Special emphasis will be placed not only on the rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union, but also on how the entire world between 1945 and 1991 was influenced by the competition between the different ideologies and socio-economic systems that those countries represented. It also will suggest how the Cold War has continued to infulence our present era.

In this course a study is done of the aims, instruments, and conduct of American foreign relations, with particular reference to contemporary problems. Students will participate in case studies.

The impact of international organizations on relationships among nations is examined and discussed. There will be special focus on the role of major institutions such as the United Nations, World Bank, International Monetary Fund, World Trade Organizations, European Union, OAS, NATO, and OPEC.

This course consists of an analysis of contemporary problems in the world community in light of the theories and concepts of international politics.

This course will examine the nature and significance of the American radical tradition from the American Revolution to the present-day. Among the radical philosophies and movements to be covered will be the socialism and communism; civil rights; Black power; feminism; the New Left; environmentalism; the gay and lesbian movement; and the global justice movement. Examination of the American radical tradition suggests that radicalism has been a persistent and significant feature of American history.

A study is made of the fundamental concepts of international law and diplomacy. Particular attention will be devoted to the significance and application of these concepts in international relations.

In this course, an inquiry is made into the role of multinational corporations in international relations. A broad range of ideas and issues are explored, including; an analysis of states and corporations as juristic entities; business transactions and world politics; corporate interest and national interest; multinationals as precursors of integrated global system; role of international law and diplomacy; and multinationals’ impact on national employment, taxation, and balance of payments. This course is not open to freshmen.

A study of the historical role of the U. S. Supreme Court and its impact on American society, including an examination of issues of political theory and major court cases.

Organized thematically, this course explores diverse issues current in modern political thought and pertinent to contemporary governments and societies.

This course surveys the ideas of leading political thinkers from early modernity through to the present day. Figures such as Bodin, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Burke, Hegel, Marx, and Mill will be discussed.

This course surveys the ideas of leading political thinkers from ancient times to the Renaissance. Figures such as Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, St. Thomas, and Machiavelli will be discussed.

This course studies American political thought from its Puritan origins to present day. The course is organized around defining moments of political thought, such as the Revolution, Constitutional Founding, Civil War, Great Depression, and Civil Rights Movement, with selections from mainstream and radical voices in each period. Readings include selections from James Madison, John Adams, Abraham Lincoln, Emma Goldman, Eugene Debs, and Martin Luther King, Jr.

In this course, students will learn the research process. Special emphasis will be placed on research design. At a minimum, students will conduct a literature review, formulate a research question, and choose the appropriate research methods to answer that question. It is expected that students’ topics will flow from their course work in political science.

An internship in a government office, social agency, or research department is required.

This is a series of independent readings to be conducted under the instructor’s supervision.

During the spring semester, students participate in a formal internship program at the New York State Assembly in Albany. The program includes completion of an academic course, a four-day orientation about the state legislative process, and seminar discussions. Students work 30 hours per week for a member of the assembly, doing legislative research, constituent relations, and other administrative tasks. Students must be accepted into this program to participate.

This course covers the basic principles of behavior, that make up the foundation of psychology. Emphasis is placed on the biological basis of behavior, sensation, perception, learning, language, memory, thinking, infancy, and childhood. The methods of inquiry used in psychology are also emphasized.

continuation of PSY1401, with an emphasis on the application of psychology to contemporary life. Topics include: motivation and emotion; social behavior; adolescence and adulthood; personality; abnormal behavior and psychotherapy; stress, health, and psychology of the workplace.

This course is an introduction to statistical methods as they are used in the social sciences. Both descriptive and inferential statistics are covered, including sampling, probability, and hypothesis testing. Specific parametric and non-parametric analyses include analysis of variance, the t-test, Chi-square, and correlation.

This course is a study of adolescent behavior, including current theories concerning the nature of adolescence. Emphasis is placed on physical, emotional, and cognitive forces, and how they interact to shape the adolescent personality.

Life cycle studies have recently focused upon the middle and older years of the life span. These studies have revealed that the declines in aging aren’t as universal, precipitous, nor inevitable as previously thought; indeed, each decade in middle years has its theme and task. It has also been found that many of the changes we associate with old age actually began during earlier periods of life. The focus in this course is on the origin and nature of these individual changes and phases.

Human sexuality is examined from biological, cultural, and psychological perspectives. Topics include sexual anatomy, childbirth, contraception, abortion, sexual development, sexual attitudes, adult sexual behavior, and alternative sexual lifestyles.

This course will focus on the many different aspects of death and dying. Some of the topics include: grief and bereavement, the hospice philosophy, children and death and dying, and AIDS. This course is appropriate for psychology and sociology majors, nurses and nursing students, gerontology students, and anyone interested in exploring this most fascinating subject.

The purpose of this course is to examine the concepts of human development, from conception to old age. Specifically, the course looks at how physical, cognitive, and socioemotional factors interact to influence learning, intelligence, language development, and the growth of personality. Major theories and the research that supports or refutes them are examined.

This meets the requirement as a writing intensive course in the major. This course provides an overview of the fundamental skills to the study of psychology. Students should develop a better understanding of how to succeed in the major and psychology-related professions. Recommended for sophomores.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of health psychology. It is an extremely useful course for those planning to enter the healthcare field. The focus will be on adults; however, pediatric issues will also be covered. This course will examine the history of health psychology, mind-body connections, the effects of stress, and behavioral factors in illness. More specifically, this course will examine coronary heart disease, hypertension, cancer, psychoneuroimmunology, chronic pain, obesity, and smoking cessation. General issues such as compliance with medical regimens and psychological disorders that may affect proper compliance with medical regimens will also be covered.

An introductory examination of the field of human cognition. Topics include perception, attention, short and long-term memory, problem solving, and decision making. Emphasis will be on understanding the scientific nature of the discipline.

This course examines aspects of psychology related to human learning and the educational process. The course surveys topics such as learning, thinking, memory, intelligence, creativity, testing, motivation, and mental development that are vital to teachers and valuable to anyone engaged in learning.

This course is a continuation of PSY2302, including a brief review of the material previously covered, such as probability, sampling, and hypothesis testing for both parametric and non-parametric analysis. Presented for the first time are such topics as Factor Analysis of Variance, the within-subjects Analysis of Variance, the paired t-test, and Chi-Square.

An experiential lab to accompany PSY2820, this course emphasizes the entry, calculation, and interpretation of statistical analyses using SPSS. Students will also learn and practice writing up statistical analyses in APA format. Exercises follow the statistical tests presented in PSY328.

This course surveys industrial and organizational applications of psychology. Principles of individual differences are discussed that relate to career choice, career advancement, management, and the workplace environment.

This course is an introduction to the physiological basis of psychology. It focuses on the human brain and nervous system as they relate to topics such as learning, memory, motivation, sensation, sleep, drugs, and mental disorders.

This course examines the historical perspectives of abnormal behavior, and the nature, classification, etiology, and treatment of a variety of psychopathologies. Intended for majors in psychology, nursing, criminal justice, occupational therapy, physical therapy, special education, and human services.

This course examines human behavior as it is affected by various social situations. Topics include the study of attitudes, social attribution, altruism, aggression, group behavior, and interpersonal attraction, among others.

This course will introduce students to social influence – from the theoretical origins in psychology to its applications in psychology, sociology, political science, and business. The main goal of the course is to illuminate the social forces that impact people’s daily lives – from choosing a brand of toothpaste to implementing organizational changes. By seeing how social influences operate in everyday situations, student can better understand why they feel and act as they do. Additionally, students will become more aware of attempts to influence them, and will be more adept at influencing others.

In this course, theories and research directed toward understanding individual differences in thought, feeling and behavior are considered. Major focus will be on psychodynamic, humanistic, behavioral, cognitive, and trait perspectives. Psychotherapies will be examined as implementations of personality theory.

This is a laboratory course dealing with the nature of science and scientific research methods. Although the emphasis is on experimentation, quasi-experimental designs and other research methods are covered in detail. Students carry out research projects, analyze the results, and write APA-style research reports describing the research project.

This course surveys the available instruments, tests, inventories, and questionnaires in current use today. Emphasis is placed on the practical use of psychological measurements in education and psychological practice in business and industrial settings. The theoretical assumptions of assessment, the technical characteristics of good tests, and the systems of test score reporting are covered as they apply to the use of tests and test results.

This course is designed for students to gain an understanding about specific psychological and psychiatric disturbances that afflict teenagers ages 13 to 21. Topics include teen depression, delinquent behavior, alcohol abuse, suicide and homicide, affective disorders, schizophrenia, eating disorders, and a brief introduction to family and network therapy.

The Topics in Psychology course addresses special topics not ordinarily covered in other departmental courses and often provides students with cutting-edge insights and experiences. Topics will vary each semester based on the expertise of the faculty member teaching the course. Students will be expected to read current research and literature on the selected topic, engage in class discussions of the reading, and complete a course project.

A number of advanced psychology majors are selected each semester by the psychology department to act as TAs (teaching assistants) in several undergraduate courses. The TAs are expected to deliver lectures, be involved in an active tutoring program, and to assist in both creating and scoring exams and quizzes; in short, to be involved actively in the total teaching process.

In this course, the student conducts his/her own original research project under the close supervision of the instructor. The project encompasses all phases of the research endeavor from conceptualization of the question, through data collection and analysis, to the written report in the format of the APA. Especially recommended for psychology majors considering graduate school.

Part one of a two-part course. In these courses a student pursues in depth an individualized program of reading and/or research with a specific faculty member. These courses may be repeated for credit with permission of the department up to a total of six credits.

Part two of a two-part course. In these courses a student pursues in depth an individualized program of reading and/or research with a specific faculty member. These courses may be repeated for credit with permission of the department up to a total of six credits.

This meets the requirement as a writing intensive course in the major. This course addresses the roots of modern psychological thought and methodology, from their origins in philosophy and the natural sciences through the refinement of psychology in its current form. The major theories, schools of thought, and the people who have influenced the field of psychology will be examined. This course also serves as preparation for students who will be taking Graduate Record Examinations and for graduate study in psychology.

Students are placed in off-campus settings such as detention centers, hospitals, senior citizen centers, alternative schools, and halfway houses. Journals are maintained reflecting the student’s activities and reflections while at the practicum site. An academic paper with citations from psychological literature is required, covering some aspect of the practicum experience (i. e. client population, treatment approach, strategy for change, etc. ). Detailed plans for the practicum are made in consultation with the instructor. A practicum completed in another department, which has an acceptable psychological component, may be used to fulfill this requirement.

This course presents the fundamentals of anthropology. Both physical and cultural anthropological perspectives will be utilized. A holistic focus will be on the intersection of these two perspectives as they attempt to explain human social behavior. Main topics related to the role and results of natural selection include: territoriality, food acquisition, aggression, gender roles, marriage, reproduction, religion, socialization strategies, and child rearing.

This course is designed to acquaint the student with working knowledge of the concepts used by sociologists and with the well-established generalizations in the field. Topics include socialization, primary groups, stratification, population, and bureaucracy. This course is a prerequisite for all other sociology courses.

This course examines what makes a social problem and an analysis of present areas of tension and social maladjustment, especially those associated with recent rapid social changes.

This course explores the operation and structure of complex organizations and bureaucracies. Particular emphasis is placed on corporations, government agencies, and educational institutions.

The extent and types of crime and delinquency in contemporary society, and the criminologist’s contribution to the analysis of causal factors are examined and discussed.

This course introduces the sociological perspectives of deviant behavior, including social control theory, social disorganization theory, anomie theory, labeling theory, and conflict theory. Scientific research on such deviant behaviors as prostitution, pornography, and drug use will be examined. Governmental deviance, corporate deviance, and police deviance and the cost of these forms of deviance to society are explored.

This course focuses on the creation and maintenance of social institutions and the ways in which these congeries of organizations and structures shape human relations and experience. Particular emphasis will be placed on the educational system, government, the family, religion, the economy, and the media.

An examination is made of the family as a major social institution, and how family forms and roles vary across cultures. Topics include: ethnic and social variations in structure, single-parent families, parent-child interactions, non-traditional marriages, and domestic violence.

This course is an in-depth exploration of the causes and consequences of social class inequality in the United States. Emphasis will be placed on an analysis of the multiple ways in which social and economic inequality operates to provide power and privilege to certain segments of society. The effect of social class inequality on racial and gender inequality is also considered.

Social aspects of aging over the life span will be discussed. Age-related changes, role transitions, and outcomes of increased longevity will be presented. Special topics include: race, ethnicity, retirement, access to healthcare, long-term care, as well as death and dying.

A study is made of methods used in sociological research with special emphasis on measurement and data collection. Time will also be devoted to the interview, questionnaire, and recent sociological studies.

This course examines the development and functioning of bureaucratic organizations, including both formal and informal aspects. The sociology of work will also be discussed with emphasis on occupations and professions and their performance expectations within the organization.

The course will cover the social systems of former colonial nations in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean. Emphasis will be placed on their changing institutions: political, economic, educational and social, as influenced by colonialism.

The student will study the outstanding theorists in the development of sociological thought. Special attention will be given to the works of Durkheim, Marx, and Weber. Upper division students.

This course is an intensive study of selected ethnic and racial groups and subcultures in their structural and cultural aspects. Students will study how these affect their lifestyles in relation to dominant groups within the social system. Both classical and contemporary models of minority-dominant relations will be considered for their relevance toward an adequate understanding of contemporary social systems.

This course examines the impact of religion in American life; the changing religious landscape; profiles of America’s religious groups; trends in individual religious commitment; and the relationship between religion and politics in the U. S.

Societal expectations and reactions to health and illness in the United States will be examined. Institutions and current provider systems will be described. Discussion will center around the concept of the sick role and the reciprocal statuses (medical and allied health professions) involved. Alternative health options will also be discussed.

This course presents a sociological analysis of the status of women after the Women’s Liberation movement. Special emphasis on roles, work, family, education, and goals women have set for themselves, not only in the United States but in other societies as well.

Selected topics, chosen in accordance with the student’s interests and background, are analyzed in depth.

The object of the internship program is to give the student practical experience in a social agency, business, organization, or institution. Intern assignments will be made in keeping with the student’s future vocational plans. Course work includes related readings, maintaining a journal, and a final paper summarizing the internship experience. Credits awarded will be determined by instructor and department chair.

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